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Man Murders Doctor He Believed Put A Microchip Inside Of Him

 
Prisoner of Technology
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04/21/2010 03:01 AM

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Man Murders Doctor He Believed Put A Microchip Inside Of Him
[link to www.cnn.com]

(CNN) -- A man suspected of opening fire at a Tennessee hospital Monday, killing one and wounding another before killing himself, had a history of mental health problems, police said Tuesday.

Investigators searching suspected shooter Abdo Ibssa's home found medicine for psychotic problems and a note indicating that Ibssa believed a doctor at the hospital had placed an electronic chip inside him during a 2001 appendectomy, Knoxville Police Chief Sterling Owen IV told reporters Tuesday.

"The suspect believed he was being tracked due to this chip," Owen said.

Owen said family members had committed Ibssa to a mental health facility in February, but it was not clear when he had been discharged.

Police said Ibssa shot three women outside the Parkwest Medical Center in Knoxville, Tennessee, Monday afternoon before shooting and killing himself.

Rachel Wattenbarger, 40, died from gunshot wounds.

The two survivors -- Ariane Guerin, 26, and Nancy Chancellor, 32 -- were taken to the trauma center at the University of Tennessee hospital. Owen said Tuesday that they were in stable condition.

When Ibssa showed up at the hospital Monday afternoon, he asked for the doctor who had apparently performed his appendectomy. He was told the doctor was not there, Owen said, and later opened fire outside the facility.

Owen said the .357 Magnum revolver used by the shooter was reported stolen from a residence in Knox County, Tennessee, in March.

Police searching Ibbsa's home also found a Beretta .22 handgun and a book called "The Official CIA Manual of Tracking and Deception," Owen said.
No one has ever seen a perfect circle, nor a perfectly straight line, yet everyone knows what a circle and a straight line are.
Perceived circles or lines are not exactly circular or straight, and true circles and lines could never be detected since by definition they are sets of infinitely small points.
Fifth Column
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04/21/2010 04:35 AM
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Re: Man Murders Doctor He Believed Put A Microchip Inside Of Him
Damn "V's" and their healing centers.
Anonymous Coward
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04/21/2010 04:38 AM
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Re: Man Murders Doctor He Believed Put A Microchip Inside Of Him
Damn "V's" and their healing centers.
 Quoting: Fifth Column 688517


It's really not funny but you do make a point:

That man believed something. And he saw it through to the end.

More and more people will be seeing signs and hearing voices soon, as the last days commence around us.
Prisoner of Technology (OP)

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04/21/2010 11:00 AM

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Re: Man Murders Doctor He Believed Put A Microchip Inside Of Him
I wonder if he was a GLPer. Anyone ever read "The Official CIA Manual of Tracking and Deception"?
No one has ever seen a perfect circle, nor a perfectly straight line, yet everyone knows what a circle and a straight line are.
Perceived circles or lines are not exactly circular or straight, and true circles and lines could never be detected since by definition they are sets of infinitely small points.
Prisoner of Technology (OP)

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04/21/2010 11:05 AM

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Re: Man Murders Doctor He Believed Put A Microchip Inside Of Him
Here is the review from amazon.com for those interested.

4.0 out of 5 stars A Fascinating Peek into CIA History, January 14, 2010
By Skippy the Skeptic

During the Cold War the U.S. employed a number of novel strategies to combat the numerous threats (both real and perceived) posed by the Soviet Union. The CIA in particular instituted a series of programs under the designation "MKULTRA" to combat the KGB's "brainwashing" program which sought to use psychological and pharmacological methods to alter human behavior. However, despite the success of the CIA's attempts to develop new chemical compounds, including untraceable poisons, "truth serums" and powerful sedatives for use against the KGB, it soon became obvious that all of these resources were functionally useless unless they could actually be covertly administered to targets in the field. To clear this hurdle the CIA simultaneously pursued two different paths. The first was to build new "gadgets" and "spytech" devices to deliver these chemical payloads. The second avenue, and the subject of this book, was to commission the world-famous conjuror John Mulholland to write a manual on the use of sleight of hand to secretly administer pills, powders, and liquids to enemy agents. This volume presents the sleight of hand manual in its entirety, as well as second essay by Mulholland on the application of covert recognition signals. They are preceded by a introductory article briefly discussing the history of the MKULTRA program.

Judging by some of the other reviews here on Amazon, many people had rather romanticized notions of what Mulholland's manuals contained. If you're hoping for directions on how to silently assassinate KBG operatives with ingeniously concealed weapons...you're flat out of luck. The manual instead deals with simple, relatively low-risk methods of sneakily deliver chemical payloads into a subject's food or drink utilizing very basic sleight of hand. It also briefly discusses techniques for the covert theft of small items of interest. It isn't the stuff of big-budget spy movies, but it -is- the stuff of real spies. As long as you understand this going, then this volume is unlikely to disappoint. It's a fascinating and obscure slice of history, and while reading Mulholland's manuals it's impossible not to imagine what it must have been like for CIA agents operating deep in Soviet territory where a single slip-up meant exposure and death. Sure, a few pages about how to adhere a pill to the back of a matchbook then undetectably drop it into someone's drinking glass may seem rather pedestrian...until you think about the context in which these techniques were meant to be employed. What seems simple on paper must have been well-nigh harrowing when implemented in a field, perhaps in some smoky, dangerous bar in Moscow or Kiev. Mulholland's manuals carry a lot of history with them, and I find it very difficult not to be awed by it.

In short, if you're looking for a discussion of fancy, high-tech, high drama spy craft, look elsewhere. If you're interesting in learning about real-life techniques employed by the CIA while getting a glimpse of a document that, until recently, was thought not to even exist then this book is for you.
No one has ever seen a perfect circle, nor a perfectly straight line, yet everyone knows what a circle and a straight line are.
Perceived circles or lines are not exactly circular or straight, and true circles and lines could never be detected since by definition they are sets of infinitely small points.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 916562
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04/21/2010 04:36 PM
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Re: Man Murders Doctor He Believed Put A Microchip Inside Of Him
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