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Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine

 
Krispy71

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02/26/2013 07:44 PM

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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
I think you're very clever at working out this stuff K hf

Sounds very plausible.

Maybe it's like our brains in a way, where the bulk of the activity is in only a few places, rather than the whole thing.

The sentience might be concentrated in particular areas of the planet, and then distributed via the torus.

Hey, I started a thread on why the World maps are shown the way they are, and questioned the orientation. I am hoping someone far wiser than I can shed some light on the matter, beyond the obvious answers like the map makers were at the top of the world. Looking for woowoo that will tie back in to concepts like your one above.

You have an email btw.

hf
 Quoting: BadHairDay


I added some stuff below the other post ... check it out ..lol..

I will go to use my stairway to my heavenly pillow
pilot
I will read and reply to any mail in the morning ;)



Goodnight/Goodday all
hf


XXXMzKrisperty
BadHairDay

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02/26/2013 07:54 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Cya mate.
It's all about the 'vibe'
BadHairDay

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02/26/2013 08:16 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
This is long, but worth the read. Do any US bezerkers remember this? How come we havent covered it before? Spinners and cleaners at work....

** I have highlighted some interesting text.


Twenty years ago this morning, like most who lived within an hour's drive of Wesley — 7 miles south of Brenham — I was awakened by a loud noise. Thunder? Car wreck? Airplane crash? Within minutes, my city editor called, telling me something exploded in our coverage area and serious injuries were involved. His orders: Grab your map, get on the road to Brenham, check in once there.

Fire trucks from surrounding areas sailed past me on F.M. 50. On the radio, some speculated that the disaster involved a pipeline rupture. Seemed plausible; Texas is the largest domestic producer of oil in the United States andpipelines criss-cross our cities like spaghetti on plate.

Once at a pay phone attached to a convenience store (cell phones were a luxury in the early 90s and The Eagle had zero), my city editor instructed me that I'd be writing about whatever I saw, whatever I learned. As I turned from Texas 109 onto County Road 19, the damage was increasingly obvious. I'm from Omaha, Neb., and what unfolded on either side of County Road 19 is what we saw after a tornado chewed up a neighborhood: Houses off the foundation in jumbled piles, tattered bedding and clothing high in trees stripped of lush spring leaves, mangled belongings and residents standing amid the rubble of what once was their home.

I was surprised as I approached Ground Zero that no one stopped me in my four-door Toyota Corolla. It was my fifth month and first stint at the newspaper, but I didn't have a press pass, let alone business cards. I, however, was the very last of their worries. Emergency management officials at the scene acknowledged to me that they didn't even know a gas storage facility holding liquified petroleum gas — ethane, propane and butane — resided in their community.

It was awkward to walk into the lives of these people who were going through unimaginable pain and ask them to share their thoughts with me. Their concerns. The relief that they were fine. But, that's what journalists do, so I tried to stay out of their way and respect their grief while getting details about near-misses and it-could-have-been-me-or-my-child.

I learned from a volunteer firefighter that a young Brenham police officer found the lifeless body of a blue-eyed, blonde-haired 5-year-old boy named Derrick Meinen. His mother, they said, was taken by helicopter to Hermann Hospital in Houston. Meanwhile, a resident told me about three other lives in danger: A mother and her adult daughter were burned over 60 percent of their body when their car was flattened by the explosion; the 3-year-old child in the car was burned as well. All were taken to a Houston hospital.

I filled up my notebook with stories told by strangers with a definite sadness in their eyes. Everyone knew each other in this hilly countryside painted with wildflowers in each yard, along each road. A place that until that morning was considered a slice of paradise.

A volunteer firefighter took me close to where the fireball tore through the car carrying three generations of the Diver-Medve family. The charred ground rolled out in either direction, paths that easily could be followed by scanning the tree line whipped by fire. That same firefighter took me down the driveway last traveled by the mother and daughter, then showed me the remains of the Meinen home. Everything was in pieces, including appliances. Imagine being able to hold the largest remaining part of a washing machine in one hand. Torn pictures, books and paperwork littered their field. Nearby, several of their cows lay dead.

No family milled about there. They were at the hospital in Houston where Jane would remain in a drug-induced coma until Mother's Day the next month. She missed his funeral, the heavy media coverage, the lawyers. Every day her loving husband, Alan, would tell her their only child died; every night she would forget. Mother's Day was when the bad dream didn't fade, but instead became a waking nightmare that's never slipped away.

Similar feelings of horrific loss were felt in the Medve and Diver families as both Delores, 27, and her 46-year-old mother, Gloria, died within five days of the disaster. Delores' son, Travis, suffered burns over 30 percent of his body, but recovered, at least physically. Two husbands lost their wives; a father lost his daughter; a boy, his mother.

Over the next few years, I followed up with stories on those families and many of the nearly two dozen who were injured. I covered state and federal hearings that highlighted a lack of government oversight and corporate greed. Somewhere along the way, I developed a friendship with the Meinens, a couple who taught me about grace, forgiveness, determination, selflessness and love.

On this, the 20th annniversary of this tragedy that changed so many lives forever, it didn't seem right to again ask these families to relive a pain that I'm certain they're reminded of every day.

So, instead, what follows is not just the ramifications of the explosion, but what unfolded April 7, 1992 in a community that will never forget what they lost or how.

Before the sun came up on April 7, 1992, an alarm sounded at Mid-America's 24-hour monitoring station in Tulsa, Okla. A sensor warned a dispatcher that there was hazardous gas escaping from an underground storage cavern — a salt dome — about 475 miles away in rural Wesley, Texas, about 60 miles from Houston.

Three dispatchers in Tulsa monitored the company’s 10,000 miles of pipeline, along with its gas storage facilities. The one in Wesley was unattended 16 hours each day and was operated by Seminole Pipeline Co., a subsidiary of Mid-America Pipeline.

A minute after the first alarm came at 6:09 that Tuesday morning, one of the dispatchers called a 28-year-old Seminole worker who lived in Brenham and asked him to go to the facility to investigate the source of the alarm. Both the dispatcher and the worker — neither of whom had ever practiced responding to a disaster in a mock situation — assumed if the cavern overfilled with gas that a safety system would shut it down automatically and seal the cavern, preventing vapors from escaping into the air.

Not in a rush, the worker took a shower, dressed, stopped at a convenience store for a Diet Coke and arrived at the cavern about 20 minutes later. He immediately noticed a large cloud of what looked like fog engulfing the facility. He tried to turn off the engine of his diesel truck, but the motor kept running on the airborne gas vapor.

He realized he couldn’t make it to the facility’s manual shut-off valve, so retreated to a house of a nearby resident. He called back to dispatch and mentioned there was gas in the field (but not beyond), then called his supervisor, who ordered the worker to evacuate the area and get to safety, staying far from the vapor cloud.

The residents who lent their phone told him that a school bus was expected down County Road 19, so he ignored his boss's instruction and headed into the vapor cloud, attempting to stop the bus and get to the main facility to shut off the gas. When mixed with oxygen, the worker knew that natural gas liquid vapors are extremely flammable and capable of explosive ignition.

He came across two other Seminole employees at the entrance and the trio all headed to the shut-off valve — it would be the only way to stop the gas from flowing out of the cavern.

The men were forced out of the area because too much gas had escaped and it was flooding out of the facility. The safety trailer that had emergency breathing apparatus and equipment needed to shut down the facility was 90 miles away in Sugar Land.

A flare could have ignited the escaping gas long before it accumulated into this massive cloud hugging the ground, but the common technique wasn’t used at this site.

It was about that time that the worker watched headlights of a car disappear into the vapor cloud.

By then, 27 gas alarms had sounded in Tulsa and the dispatcher who originally spoke to the worker didn’t wait for him to call back. He didn't realize the magnitude of the situation and left the building when his shift ended.

No one from Tulsa or Seminole dialed 911. No firefighters or other emergency responders had been alerted.

Jane Meinen did make that critical call though.

The 911 operator could hardly hear Jane explain that she smelled gas because of a whistling noise at the plant, which was just several hundred yards from the mobile home she shared with her husband, Alan, and 5-year-old son, Derrick. Their’s was the closest residence to the facility.

Jane gave details that few likely would be able to remember in such a situation — she recalled the name of the company that operated the facility and that the emergency number was out of Tulsa. Her husband was at work at the Coke bottling plant in Brenham; her son, still asleep in his bed.

Her neighbors a few acres away already were in their car, driving down a gravel and dirt driveway toward County Road 19. Gloria Diver, who worked the front desk at the local hospital, was with her daughter, Delores Medve, while her 3-year-old grandson, Travis Medve, was laying down in the backseat.

Headlights from that car were what the Seminole employee had watched disappear into the vapor cloud that was disguised as morning fog.

Seconds later, the cloud exploded with the estimated force of a three-kiloton bomb. The blast registered between 3.5 and 4.0 on the Richter scale and was felt as far away as San Antonio.

Derrick's lifeless body was found by a police officer who responded to the scene within minutes. Jane, who was wearing a back brace because she was recovering from surgery, was discovered in what once was her rose bed.

More than 60 buildings within 3 square miles of the station were damaged and dozens of homes were destroyed, including those lived in by the Meinens, Medves and Divers. It later would be estimated that $9 million in damage was caused by the explosion.

Here’s what investigators learned in the weeks and months that followed:

The salt dome began construction of the salt dome cavern in 1980 and periodiically increased the facility's storage capacity by "washing" the cavern with fresh water, which carved out a huge cavern increased the capacity. A year later, the company obtained a permit from the Texas Railroad Commission to use the cavern as a storage faiclity for up to 150,000 barrels of natural gas liquids. Over the next 10 years, however, it more than doubled that amount to about 336,000 barrels.

• The company emptied the cavern an average of 16 times per year from 1982 through 1991, but for a reason never explained they stopped mid-way through 1991. During the first seven months of 1991, the cavern was emptied eight times. But not even once in the nine months leading up to the explosion.

• The volume of product reached an all-time high just 27 days before the accident. Staffers questioned the estimate since it hadn’t been emptied for nine months and an employee was told to “sit” at the cavern overnight to watch for signs of an overfill as the amount going in was reduced.

• Eight days before the blast, Seminole officials met to discuss the fact there were a series of serious miscalculations on how much liquefied petroleum gas was in the cavern, so a supervisor suggested they empty it. That request was disregarded, the cavern was not emptied, inventory calibrations were not reset and more natural gas liquids were pumped beneath the ground.

• The safety system that was supposed to shut down and close the cavern was poorly designed and wasn't properly maintained. The safety switch was rebuilt from used parts, yet it was the only automated safety device capable of stopping the situation.

Investigations by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Texas Railroad Commission renewed concerns about the safety of salt domes used to house natural gases. Hearings were held in Austin and Washington D.C., including several at which Jane Meinen testified, telling not just about her loss and the long-term injuries she'd suffer, but about the education she acquired on how government allowed an industry to go unregulated.

Both inquiries pointed out that it wasn't caused by one solitary failure. The companies involved were using infallible technology and didn't appreciate the role humans have in a highly technical system, but also there was an arrogance among managers and owners who believed they held an inherent superiority to government regulations and sound operating practices, the NTSB found.

Simply put, it was a trade off between revenue and safety. Money won.

It wasn't just mechanical failures and human errors, it was organizational failings caused by a company culture that didn't make safety paramount, didn't train its responders and dispatchers, didn't encourage safe operations and didn't provide communication training or tools for its employees. The system was loaded with opportunities for failure.

Here's a number that speaks for itself: More than 700 errors were made by operators using incorrect temperature and pressure correction factors in their cacluations at the salt dome over a 270-day period.

NTSB investigators dug deep in pursuit of making sure that the same mistakes weren't made over and over again. They recommended greater safety controls after pointing out that there were no federal regulations governing salt domes and no requirements given by state government.

That government indifference was part of the problem. It took five years, but finally the U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration issued an advisory to operators of gas and hazardous liquid underground storage facilities: Henceforth, they were were required to create design guidelines and operation guidelines for salt domes, efforts that long ago should have been made mandatory.

The lessons learned by the industry that day live on, at least for the NTSB which still points to it as a way to learn about bad corporate culture and what happens when safety is an afterthought.

Though investigations got to the bottom of what went wrong and top management was made to publicly admit they mismanaged that site, and even though millions of dollars were paid out in settlements to those impacted by negligence, the explosion that shook Wesley and swallowed three lives can never be fully explained away.

An industry that produces the most revenue in Texas and brings in among the largest bonuses for its leaders should have been more accountable. Instead, they jotted down the 'lessons learned' and moved on down the road.

Today, there is no big memorial service like there was on the one-year anniversary. Nothing on the local newspaper's website about it. Those who survived and those who lost loved ones 20 years ago today grieve and remember in their own way, as it should be.


[link to www.theeagle.com]


Written last year.

The highlighted section where the emergency management people 'had no idea their town was situated above such a storage cavern' will be re-itterated across the US methinks.

Reserves can only be quoted because they know how much volume is in them.

Ther are hundreds, if not thousands of these reserves dotted along the coastlines, and further in land around mostly salt dome structures, many of which, like the Napoleon Dome, contain multiple reserves, with various hydrocarbon products, and toxic materials.
It's all about the 'vibe'
BadHairDay

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02/26/2013 08:32 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Sorry to be a page hog, but I am finding (? given hints?) at more and more historical information on salt domes, oil, methane and possible causes of where we are at today.

Again, sorry for the long articles. But really worth the read.

I never knew any of this regarding nuclear testing in MISSISSIPI. Yep, Missy... and guess what they tested these nukes IN? A slat dome, which we now know is connected to other domes. Add to that fracking, and the joint is cracking to pieces...


"At 10:00 a.m. on October 22, 1964, the United States government detonated an underground nuclear device in Lamar County, in south Mississippi. Residents there felt three separate shocks, and watched as the soil rose and behaved like ocean waves. Hunting dogs howled in terror, and two miles from the test site the blast shook pecans off the pecan trees. This nuclear test, and the one that followed two years later at the same Mississippi site, were the only nuclear explosions on U.S. soil east of the Rocky Mountain states.

Atomic bombs were in the news in October 1964. Only one week before the Mississippi nuclear test, newspapers had reported that Communist China had detonated its first atomic bomb. For residents in Lamar County, however, no news story was watched more closely than the plans for nuclear testing in Mississippi.

Project Dribble

A number of nuclear testing experts said it was not a good idea to prohibit underground testing, because some nations might cheat by secretly testing nuclear weapons underground. In most cases, seismographs (the device used to measure earthquakes) could detect underground nuclear tests. The United States wanted to know more about underground testing and how it could be detected, and designed Project Dribble, which included the two Mississippi detonations, to investigate the possibility that cheating nations could hide their underground tests in some way.

Nuclear scientists investigated several potential test sites in Mississippi, but finally selected a site just north of Baxterville in Lamar County, about 28 miles southwest of Hattiesburg. Geologically, the area was called the Tatum Salt Dome, a vast supply of dense salt located about 1,000 feet below ground level. Salt domes deep beneath the surface of south central Mississippi are the dried remains of a sea that covered much of the state in the Mesozoic Era. The plan was to detonate one nuclear bomb about 2,700 feet down, in solid salt. This would be the 1964 blast, code-named Project Salmon. It was believed Project Salmon would blast a huge cavity in the salt. Then the second blast, Project Sterling, would involve detonating a smaller nuclear bomb inside the cavity left in the salt by Project Salmon. Scientists believed that because the bomb would be detonated in a cavity rather than in solid rock, the shock waves would be muffled and the test might not be detectable by seismographs and other measuring devices.

So in 1964 officials of the Atomic Energy Commission came to Mississippi and began preparing the Tatum Salt Dome site for Project Salmon. A hundred Lamar County residents found work at the site, primarily driving trucks and heavy equipment, or providing food for the project employees. The nuclear test was scheduled for September 22, 1964, but the wind direction was not right until October 22. On that date about 400 residents were evacuated from the area, and were paid $10 per adult and $5 per child for their inconvenience. The zone from which citizens were evacuated stretched five miles downwind of ground zero, and about half that distance in directions that were not downwind of the test. Click here to see the Mississippi segment from the Peter Kuran film “Atomic Journeys.” (YouTube site accessed July 2008.)

Most residents later reported that the shock of the explosion was much stronger than they had been led to believe. The editor of the Hattiesburg American, although almost thirty miles away, reported that he felt the newspaper building sway for nearly three minutes. At the test site, creeks ran black with silt-laden water, and by seven days after the blast, more than 400 nearby residents had filed damage claims with the government, reporting that their homes had been damaged or that their water wells had gone dry.

Horace Burge lived about two miles from the site of the explosion, and returned home to his three-room house to discover considerable damage caused by the blast. The fireplace and chimney were badly damaged, and bricks littered his living room. Broken dishes and jars were all over his kitchen floor, and the shelves fell down inside his refrigerator and broke several glass containers. His electric stove was covered with ash and pieces of concrete. The pipes under his kitchen sink had burst, leading to flooding inside the house.

Within days, the United States government began reimbursing local residents for the damage done to their homes. After the blast, reporters from the Hattiesburg American interviewed many local residents who said they didn’t want this nuclear testing to be done in their neighborhoods, but who added that there was nothing they could do about it. In an editorial, the Hattiesburg American lectured its readers that such tests were necessary for the future security of the United States.

After seismic analysis, the government scientists reported that Project Salmon had been a success, with the bomb delivering the same force as 5,000 tons of TNT. The Project Salmon blast was about one-third as powerful as the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945. The bomb blasted a void in the salt as predicted, a spherical cavity that was about 110 feet in diameter.

The Project Sterling blast, on December 3, 1966, was considerably weaker than the blast two years earlier, as it was intended to be. Instead of the force of 5,000 tons of TNT that Project Salmon had developed, Project Sterling’s bomb had the force of 350 tons of TNT. Observers two miles away from the blast reported they barely felt a bump. Like Project Salmon, Project Sterling was labeled a success. Because it was detonated in a cavity in the salt, its force, as measured by seismographs, was about 100 times weaker than would have been expected with the same sized bomb placed in solid rock or salt. Thus U.S. government officials reported that Mississippi’s two nuclear blasts, as a part of Project Dribble, helped prove that in fact the seismic effect of a nuclear blast could be greatly reduced if such a blast were set off in a large cave. This suggested it might be possible for a nation to cheat on a future nuclear test ban by hiding a nuclear test. It also helped teach atomic scientists how to detect and measure such hidden blasts.

Though Mississippi’s part in nuclear testing was over by 1966, the Tatum Salt Dome site did see two additional tests by the Atomic Energy Commission as a part of Project Miracle Play. Project Miracle Play was similar to Project Dribble in that it too was designed to detect underground testing, but this time the two blasts were conventional bombs instead of nuclear. Mississippi’s two explosions in Project Miracle Play in 1969 and 1970 were fueled by a mixture of oxygen and methane.

With any nuclear test there is the danger of health problems developing among the people and other living things near the test site. At the Mississippi nuclear test site, one fear in 1964 was that these underground explosions would “blow out” during the tests, sending dirt, gasses, and radioactive material high into the air. Government officials said this was unlikely, pointing out that the 2,700-foot shaft had been filled with gravel and an enormous concrete plug. After the 1964 blast, scientists reassured Mississippians by reporting that all radiation had been contained underground. They said the soil, water, and air in the area was not made radioactive.

Unfortunately, the site did become contaminated after the blast. Two months after the 1964 test, nuclear researchers drilled a hole down into the void left by the blast in order to lower instruments into the cavity. In drilling the hole, the drill bit brought radioactive soil and water up to the surface. The same thing happened in 1966. Several times the U.S. government came in to attempt to clean up the Tatum Salt Dome site.

In 1972, buildings at the site were bulldozed and sent to the government’s Nevada Test Site, where considerable radioactive material was already in storage. Most of the other radioactive material at the Tatum Salt Dome site (primarily soil, rock, and water) were put back down into the test cavity, where it remains today in solid or sludge form. Some of the radioactive liquids were injected into “Aquifer Number 5,” a vein of salty water located about 2,500 feet underground at the Tatum Salt Dome site. U.S. government officials erected a large stone monument at the site, with a brass plaque warning future generations not to drill or dig in the vicinity of this test site.

Some Lamar County residents complained of lingering health effects in the decades after the blast. Some argued that the number of cancer deaths in the Tatum Salt Dome area is higher than national averages. Federal officials maintain that there is no health risk associated with living near the Tatum Salt Dome site, but the government did pay at least one former Mississippi employee of Project Dribble for unspecified health damages. Around 2000, the government built a water pipeline to help residents near the Tatum Salt Dome get drinking water from far away from the test site, in hopes of calming residents’ fears about their drinking water.


Boyer, Paul. By the Dawn’s Early Light.
Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1994.

Miller, Richard L. Under the Clouds: the Decades of Nuclear Testing.
Woodlands, Texas: Two Sixty Press, 1999.

[link to mshistorynow.mdah.state.ms.us]

I dont think I need to highlight anything...

Last Edited by BadHairDay on 02/26/2013 08:32 PM
It's all about the 'vibe'
BadHairDay

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02/26/2013 08:38 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Fascinating report on salt domes in Texas, Louisiana and Mexico. (including the GoM)

So many references to "we dont really know" in the text.

[link to www.google.com.au]
It's all about the 'vibe'
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 34399218
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02/26/2013 08:49 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Fascinating report on salt domes in Texas, Louisiana and Mexico. (including the GoM)

So many references to "we dont really know" in the text.

[link to www.google.com.au]
 Quoting: BadHairDay


Why wouldn't ya start your own thread? 1441 pages on this thread.
BadHairDay

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02/26/2013 08:49 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Michigan firm wins salt-dome roof bid for Smithtown

Friday December 21, 2012 11:41 AM By Carl MacGowan

A Michigan company submitted the lowest bid to replace a Town of Smithtown salt dome roof destroyed by superstorm Sandy, Supervisor Patrick Vecchio said Thursday.

The town board was set to meet at 10 a.m. today to award a contract to Dome Corp. of America to build a new roof at the town’s highway department yard on Route 347 in Nesconset. The Saginaw, Mich., company submitted a winning bid...

[link to www.newsday.com]


Just think about that for a sec... and keep in the back of your mind the first long story.

I wonder what is stored in THIS salt dome? I wonder of emergency response people are aware of how big it is, and just how close to NY it is too.
It's all about the 'vibe'
BadHairDay

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02/26/2013 08:56 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Last one for today, promiss..


Department of Energy Halts Destructive Richton Salt Dome Project




For Immediate Release: September 21, 2011
Contact:
Raleigh Hoke, Raleigh@healthygulf.org, 504-525-1528, ext. 204
Eric Richards, e.richards@vthm.com, 228-762-0814


On September 9th, 2011, the Department of Energy announced the cancellation of the last ongoing environmental study for the Richton salt dome project, effectively halting any further progress on the project. This irresponsible oil storage scheme would have required the removal of 50 million gallons of water a day from the Pascagoula River for five to six years to dissolve underground salt deposits. The extremely salty, polluted byproduct from this process would have then been discharged south of Horn Island, potentially creating a large dead zone where little sea life could survive.

”I commend the Department of Energy on their decision,” said Raleigh Hoke, Mississippi Organizer for the Gulf Restoration Network. “The people who live, work, and play in South Mississippi rely on a healthy Pascagoula River and Mississippi Sound and they shouldn’t be forced to sacrifice these amazing resources for a destructive and expensive boondoggle like the Richton salt dome project.”

Since the Richton project was first proposed, a large and diverse coalition of concerned citizens, and community and conservation groups have weighed in against this environmentally and economically damaging project. Hundreds of individuals attended hearings to call for a halt to the Richton salt dome project, and thousands of people signed petitions or wrote emails urging the Department of Energy to cancel it. Ultimately, this effort paid off.

“Hearing that the project is officially dead for now is great news to the Gulf Conservation Coalition and virtually everyone in South Mississippi. The civics lesson that this event provides is that a single voice of reason may have difficulty being heard. Hundreds or thousands of like voices get heard, and can accomplish great things,” said Eric Richards, Spokesperson for the Gulf Conservation Coalition.

To view the Department of Energy’s official release on the cancellation of the Richton salt dome project’s Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, visit this site: [link to www.gpo.gov]



They be everywhere. Did you see the language used? Irresponsible, danger, damaging....

And the mighty Mississipi is at her lowest levels since the droughts in the 80's.

Where's all that water being diverted I wonder? Making more domes into reserves to store or move current reserves in unstable areas?

Quenching the New Madrid fault line?

Being pumped in to unstable caverns created by fracking, in order to stabilise the strata?

Last Edited by BadHairDay on 02/26/2013 09:00 PM
It's all about the 'vibe'
BadHairDay

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02/26/2013 08:57 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Fascinating report on salt domes in Texas, Louisiana and Mexico. (including the GoM)

So many references to "we dont really know" in the text.

[link to www.google.com.au]
 Quoting: BadHairDay


Why wouldn't ya start your own thread? 1441 pages on this thread.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 34399218


Look I might, friend, but I want the folks here to be able to reference it for this topic.

Loyalty is to this thread over starting another. hf
It's all about the 'vibe'
SouthernLight

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02/27/2013 02:17 AM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Interesting posts, BHD!

I've wondered if fracking is being used with intent to 'manage' fault zones too. After a bit more reading though, I doubt this is the case.
Seems it is all about the money, with no forethought to possible geo repercussions.

Please forgive the geo-centricity... all US info. This is going on all over the world, anywhere shale deposits are found. Some countries have banned the use of fracking and in almost every country there are anti-fracking movements.

Here's a sampling of pro-fracking info...

[link to frackingboom.com]

didn't spend much time on this page, but the following links were found on it.

fracking farms... detailed information
[link to frackingfarm.drillfrackrepeat.com]

fracking fluid... image: list of contents
[link to frackingboom.com]


Now, as to the earthquake issues... Evidently, it is the waste water causing the uptick in small quakes!

"Does Fracking Cause Earthquakes?"
[link to www.motherjones.com]

US Geological Survey
Session: The M5.8 Central Virginia and the M5.6 Oklahoma Earthquakes of 2011
"Are Seismicity Rate Changes in the Midcontinent Natural or Manmade?"
[link to www2.seismosoc.org]


Still thinking on the bigger picture with its multitude of levels/ players/ points of perspective... Hella lot to wrap ones head around, even a small section at a time.
stars
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
BadHairDay

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02/27/2013 05:31 AM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Hi Southern' the fracking issue is everywhere.

They are doing it here in Sydney, and I'm part of a small anti-fracking group that pickets anything near the Lane Cove National Park. It's amazing how a council can give these opportunists a lease to explore only 100m from official national park sanctuary.

We have a lovely region near by called the Hunter Valley, and it is a large fruit, veg and farming region, especially known for grapes and wine.

Also known for coal mines.

They did the sums, and realised shale gas would be infinately cheaper to mine.

If we see it, why the heck cant other folks? Crazy.

There has been a bit of a legal stir here, as the industry watchdog has been caught out with their pants down. They are not allowed to grant a lease if the emmissions are past a certain part per million.

Some clever chaps basically strapped their laboratory to their 4WD, and went on a tour. What did they find? Levels thousands of times higher than legal.

Why was it allowed? In the fine print was a section known as "unknown and unforseen gas emmissions beyond control" or something to that nature. They were hiding part of the reading in that area... bastards. These 'mines' are usually remotely monitored, and rarely visited. No wonder they do this over a coal mine employing hundreds, paying wages, insurance etc.
It's all about the 'vibe'
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 05:47 AM

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Who upgraded my account !!!???!!!


bighug

flowas


THANK YOU !!!
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 05:48 AM

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Wth have they been doing in Antarctica ????




Mother nature didnt make THIS happen !!!!!


xxxMzK
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 05:54 AM

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Nice words Czarcasym hf



(I agree we need more men like tha BHDaddy 5a

and we need more bezerkers to ..lol... come out of their closets ..lol...)

xxxMzK
 Quoting: Krispy71


Thank you MzK...

I have finally had a little time to start catching up...

The Bezerkers sure have been busy...I was like 300 pages behind...but I seem to be catching up...

Thanks for all your hard work and post...

I hope all is well...

hf

Cz

rockon
 Quoting: Czarcasym



Hiya Cz :D
wowwww 300 behind ... omg !!! ...
Tnx for catching up, very brave of you ;)

Great to have more and more old peeps peep back in again !!! hf


Some things are well, others are great and some things suck like hell ... Great processes, great changes (for the better) and I am still standing ;)
I think the Alignment made some plate-tectonics in my life and body shift ...lol... my mind is ahead, took a rightfully and right turn, but my body still wants to go ahead and straight on ...lol...
No worries we will synchronise quickly again :D

Hope you are well too.


xxxMzK
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 06:01 AM

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Got a red negative karma vote ..lol...

I pied my jogs full when I saw what the motivation was :

2/18/2013 Y-o-u A-r-e D-e-l-u-s-i-o-n-a-l


Whahahaha ... Tnx mate hf




Edit to add:

Was it becoz of the posts that day ?
Thread: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine (Page 1436)
- The "Antarctic Elisabeth station - pyramid" post
- The "OA polar-bacterium in Tasman Sea and GOM" post
- The "RENA-canisters" post
- The "ruski meteorite & Black Knight Object" post
- The "alpha olefiens" post

scratching

Last Edited by Krispy71 on 02/27/2013 06:12 AM
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 06:45 AM

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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Hello RA

I promissed to come back on the "red dust" article
[link to www.nzherald.co.nz]

angel3


- The article states that the phytoplankton in Sydney harbour trippled with the drop of that "dust" :
"Measurements from the Sydney Institute of Marine Science (SIMS) showed the amount of phytoplankton in Sydney Harbour and 10km offshore tripled."
---> Thus it must have CONTAINED SOMETHING deliberate


- "At one point, an average of 75,000 tonnes of dust was being dumped each hour into the Tasman Sea."
---> Are there records of an event like this in history ? Not only the orange fog (that has happened before, colored clouds in China and Russia etc)


- "Phytoplankton which use the nutrients - such as nitrogen and phosphates, and trace elements such as iron - contained in the dusty soil are responsible for half of all the plant production of oxygen on the planet.
The researchers said the extra phytoplankton in the Tasman Sea have captured eight million tonnes of atmospheric carbon dioxide to fuel their growth - equivalent to a year's emissions from a coal-fired power station."

---> Was this a test ???
Could the extra IRON-ADD [in the corexit] in the GOM a part of a TEST also ?
We know it [the iron] boosted bacterial and algae growth there expansionary !

So between AUS and NZ they "evoked" an iron-soil-dust-storm,
and in the GOM they used tonnes of CEMENT and MUD-dirt to close the well !!!
Is there a connection ??!!!!

There might ....


- "The phytoplankton will also work its way through the ocean food chain and produce more fish, the researchers said."
---> IF this 'dirt and soil and mud and cement' was INJECTED with SOMETHING .... lets suggest SYNTHIA [or one of her siblings invented by Venter] ... then they would grow exponentially, replicate as hell WITHIN THE PHYTOPLANKTON that tripled !!! This NEW SYNTHETIC phytoplankton would be eaten by sealife, and would be eaten by us ...
THAT is NOT an INJECTION,
that is an infection !!!

We all know and remember what was said about Synthia,
synthia actually is capable of infiltrating and taking over other micro organisms.
SYNTHIA takes over the entire DNA sequence of an human organism's methods beyond the initial identity and isolation stages will also carried out on unwilling
hosts which have no recourse but submission to elite programming.



In 2003, JCVI successfully synthesized a small virus that infects bacteria. By 2008, the JCVI team was able to synthesize a small bacterial genome. On May 6, 2010, JCVI revealed they had already created a self-replicating bacterial cell controlled by a chemically synthesized genome they named “synthetic Mycoplasma mycoides JCVI-syn1.0”. (7) This completely synthetic cell with its computer designed genome has absolutely no natural DNA. (1) The etc group from Canada named it Synthia and it contains added watermark chains to identify the genome as artificial. It also has antibiotic resistance indicators. (7) One can only speculate why this artificial bacterium has an inherent programmed capability to resist antibiotics.

This new life form has the ability to replicate itself and organically function in any cell into which it has been introduced. Its DNA is artificial and it’s this synthetic DNA that takes control of the cell and is credited with being the building block of life. This is the first self-replicating synthetic bacterial cell thanks to its computer generated DNA. All of the funding for this came from Synthetic Genomics Inc (1), the company BP has a sizable equity position and alliance with. BP is definitely way beyond petroleum just as their new slogan publicizes.

Why watermark this artificial genome? Doing so makes it identifiable as the unique and patented (privately owned) asset it is. What happens if a human becomes infected with a life-threatening variant bacterial species of Synthia? If you use Penicillin to fight the infection, it won’t do any good. Antibiotic resistance is part of its DNA sequence, so any use of antibiotics would be a waste of time.

What would happen if mankind is contaminated by this self-reproducing artificial life form by contact or by breathing it? Would we become subjective to the DNA of the synthetic cells flowing throughout our bodies? Would the Synthia cells combine with other bacterium within us to create a new deadly bacterium? Since the micro-organism is created and gets its programming from computers, would we become subject to artificial electro-magnetic frequencies recognized by these genomes? There are a lot of questions that need to yet be answered. What matters most is this: Will we find out those answers in time?

Complete article located at [link to worldvisionportal.org]
 Quoting: from article THE GULF BLUE PLAGUE


Breating it ??? -> Orange dust fog ????


I remember that it was said in an article that AUSSI had a special specific different kind of SOIL then other continents ...

Funny that this drop of dust was in the same area as now the canisters are popping up ....



pilot
xxxMzK
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 06:57 AM

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wave


Is THIS what they have done to JAPAN - Fukushima ???


‘Tsunami Bomb’ Tested Off New Zealand Coast
[removed link, glp did not like it ..]

snips:
- The United States and New Zealand conducted secret tests of a “tsunami bomb” designed to destroy coastal cities by using underwater blasts to trigger massive tidal waves.

- The tests were carried out in waters around New Caledonia and Auckland during the Second World War and showed that the weapon was feasible and a series of 10 large offshore blasts could potentially create a 33-foot tsunami capable of inundating a small city. **

- top secret operation, code-named “Project Seal

- Experts concluded that single explosions were not powerful enough and a successful tsunami bomb would require about 2 million kilograms of explosive arrayed in a line about five miles from shore.




** If they were capable of doing that in WW2,
just imagine what they are capable of now ....


Now remember what OP/Aco said about bombs, explosives and dual key's to ignite them ???
I think here we have again something that seems to prove a part of what we discussed here in Bezerk.

Japan was deliberately attacted, by a tsunami-bomb.


xxxMzK

Last Edited by Krispy71 on 02/27/2013 07:00 AM
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 07:26 AM

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Bio-engenering ...
artificial life-forms ...
genetic manipulations ....

scratching

Feb 8 2013
Mystery purple spheres found in desert
[link to www.dailymail.co.uk]


snip :
"reported that they were like "gooey marbles that oozed out a water substance when squished."

Some of the spheres appeared to be translucent and others watery.

Botanists consulted by the station speculated that the spheres could be "some sort of fungal growth".

Tucson Botanical Gardens' marketing director Darlene Buhrow said that if the spheres were naturally occurring, they could be a slime mould or jelly fungus. "


AUgie related ?
Or SYNTHIA related ?


xxxMzK

Last Edited by Krispy71 on 02/27/2013 07:32 AM
BadHairDay

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02/27/2013 08:28 AM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Hello RA

I promissed to come back on the "red dust" article
[link to www.nzherald.co.nz]

angel3


- The article states that the phytoplankton in Sydney harbour trippled with the drop of that "dust" :
"Measurements from the Sydney Institute of Marine Science (SIMS) showed the amount of phytoplankton in Sydney Harbour and 10km offshore tripled."
---> Thus it must have CONTAINED SOMETHING deliberate


- "At one point, an average of 75,000 tonnes of dust was being dumped each hour into the Tasman Sea."
---> Are there records of an event like this in history ? Not only the orange fog (that has happened before, colored clouds in China and Russia etc)


- "Phytoplankton which use the nutrients - such as nitrogen and phosphates, and trace elements such as iron - contained in the dusty soil are responsible for half of all the plant production of oxygen on the planet.
The researchers said the extra phytoplankton in the Tasman Sea have captured eight million tonnes of atmospheric carbon dioxide to fuel their growth - equivalent to a year's emissions from a coal-fired power station."

---> Was this a test ???
Could the extra IRON-ADD [in the corexit] in the GOM a part of a TEST also ?
We know it [the iron] boosted bacterial and algae growth there expansionary !

So between AUS and NZ they "evoked" an iron-soil-dust-storm,
and in the GOM they used tonnes of CEMENT and MUD-dirt to close the well !!!
Is there a connection ??!!!!

There might ....


- "The phytoplankton will also work its way through the ocean food chain and produce more fish, the researchers said."
---> IF this 'dirt and soil and mud and cement' was INJECTED with SOMETHING .... lets suggest SYNTHIA [or one of her siblings invented by Venter] ... then they would grow exponentially, replicate as hell WITHIN THE PHYTOPLANKTON that tripled !!! This NEW SYNTHETIC phytoplankton would be eaten by sealife, and would be eaten by us ...
THAT is NOT an INJECTION,
that is an infection !!!

We all know and remember what was said about Synthia,
synthia actually is capable of infiltrating and taking over other micro organisms.
SYNTHIA takes over the entire DNA sequence of an human organism's methods beyond the initial identity and isolation stages will also carried out on unwilling
hosts which have no recourse but submission to elite programming.



In 2003, JCVI successfully synthesized a small virus that infects bacteria. By 2008, the JCVI team was able to synthesize a small bacterial genome. On May 6, 2010, JCVI revealed they had already created a self-replicating bacterial cell controlled by a chemically synthesized genome they named “synthetic Mycoplasma mycoides JCVI-syn1.0”. (7) This completely synthetic cell with its computer designed genome has absolutely no natural DNA. (1) The etc group from Canada named it Synthia and it contains added watermark chains to identify the genome as artificial. It also has antibiotic resistance indicators. (7) One can only speculate why this artificial bacterium has an inherent programmed capability to resist antibiotics.

This new life form has the ability to replicate itself and organically function in any cell into which it has been introduced. Its DNA is artificial and it’s this synthetic DNA that takes control of the cell and is credited with being the building block of life. This is the first self-replicating synthetic bacterial cell thanks to its computer generated DNA. All of the funding for this came from Synthetic Genomics Inc (1), the company BP has a sizable equity position and alliance with. BP is definitely way beyond petroleum just as their new slogan publicizes.

Why watermark this artificial genome? Doing so makes it identifiable as the unique and patented (privately owned) asset it is. What happens if a human becomes infected with a life-threatening variant bacterial species of Synthia? If you use Penicillin to fight the infection, it won’t do any good. Antibiotic resistance is part of its DNA sequence, so any use of antibiotics would be a waste of time.

What would happen if mankind is contaminated by this self-reproducing artificial life form by contact or by breathing it? Would we become subjective to the DNA of the synthetic cells flowing throughout our bodies? Would the Synthia cells combine with other bacterium within us to create a new deadly bacterium? Since the micro-organism is created and gets its programming from computers, would we become subject to artificial electro-magnetic frequencies recognized by these genomes? There are a lot of questions that need to yet be answered. What matters most is this: Will we find out those answers in time?

Complete article located at [link to worldvisionportal.org]
 Quoting: from article THE GULF BLUE PLAGUE


Breating it ??? -> Orange dust fog ????


I remember that it was said in an article that AUSSI had a special specific different kind of SOIL then other continents ...

Funny that this drop of dust was in the same area as now the canisters are popping up ....



pilot
xxxMzK
 Quoting: Krispy71


Whilst they try to pin the dust on a dust storm, I think the mass may have come from higher up, perhaps even a comet tail that recently went by us.
It's all about the 'vibe'
BadHairDay

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02/27/2013 08:32 AM
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Got a red negative karma vote ..lol...

I pied my jogs full when I saw what the motivation was :

2/18/2013 Y-o-u A-r-e D-e-l-u-s-i-o-n-a-l


Whahahaha ... Tnx mate hf




Edit to add:

Was it becoz of the posts that day ?
Thread: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine (Page 1436)
- The "Antarctic Elisabeth station - pyramid" post
- The "OA polar-bacterium in Tasman Sea and GOM" post
- The "RENA-canisters" post
- The "ruski meteorite & Black Knight Object" post
- The "alpha olefiens" post

scratching
 Quoting: Krispy71


I think someone we know had a few beers or bongs last night, and just couldnt resist...
It's all about the 'vibe'
integrator
INTEGRATOR

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02/27/2013 08:37 AM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Got a red negative karma vote ..lol...

I pied my jogs full when I saw what the motivation was :

2/18/2013 Y-o-u A-r-e D-e-l-u-s-i-o-n-a-l

Whahahaha ... Tnx mate hf

Edit to add:

Was it becoz of the posts that day ?

Thread: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine (Page 1436)

- The "Antarctic Elisabeth station - pyramid" post
- The "OA polar-bacterium in Tasman Sea and GOM" post
- The "RENA-canisters" post
- The "ruski meteorite & Black Knight Object" post
- The "alpha olefiens" post

scratching
 Quoting: Krispy71


KRISPY! Worry not ~ you and many BEZERKER posters are now coming up with BHD's bigger picture, fingerposting THE TRUTH which is becoming unstoppable.

There is nothing like experience and in mine, without any doubt it seems that

What people Think they are doing
What they Say they are doing
What they are Actually doing
What it might be better (for them) if they Were doing

are four entirely different things!

"Maybe We Will Never Know."

Before attempting to summarise The Global Tapestry, embracing such things as:

ICE STATIONS, CRAZY HORSE OIL LEAKS, Synthia, Augie, (Junk) DNA, ET IN ARKadia EGO, (ever so, In COG neat Oh!) fracking, aquafers, RENA, sinkholes, Thule, the ARKTIC, THE VATICAN, Alastair MacLean, Howard Hughes, RAYTHEON and so on ...

Here is a quote for today:

Did the Vatican ever preach truth?

Was there anything honest in what they have forced on mankind? It is time for the Light of Truth to shine brightly on the Vatican.

J Edgar Hoover, said . . .

THE INDIVIDUAL IS HANDICAPPED BY COMING FACE TO FACE WITH A CONSPIRACY SO MONSTROUS HE CANNOT BELIEVE IT EXISTS.

"This is exactly what you are having to face. The Cabal was so sure that you would never wake up and see clearly this conspiracy. They attack all those who try to open your eyes to it.

The truth will set you free. Remember that the truth is there, before you, HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT.

Think of this as you journey to enlightenment and freedom. Send love and light to each other. Come together as never before and nothing can stop you".


So You Can All Take Courage ~ here comes the bigger picture

hf
integrator
Dead space 3 bitches!
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02/27/2013 08:37 AM
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watch this.... Ea games = they know!
BadHairDay

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02/27/2013 08:56 AM
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Officials: Work by giant sinkhole suspended — “Increase in underground fluid movement” — Odor from hydrocarbons being released
Published: February 26th, 2013 at 3:17 pm ET
By ENENews

Assumption Parish Police Jury, 1:15p ET: The Office of Conservation is advising Assumption Parish officials and the public in the Bayou Corne area that CB&I and Itasca Group analysis of ongoing seismic monitoring has detected what appears to be an uptick in underground fluid movement below the sinkhole in the vicinity of the failed Oxy 3 cavern in the past 24 hours. As has been noted in earlier similar events, the fluid movement appears to be linked to observations of trees falling into the sinkhole, release of trapped debris from the sinkhole bottom and increased odor from hydrocarbons released to surface. CB&I and Itasca Group analysts have advised that, while the activity appears to represent no additional significant threat to the general area, operations directly on the sinkhole be suspended until subsurface activity slows again.

The Advocate: Sinkhole work suspended after underground tremors detected [...] Response operations on an 8.6-acre sinkhole in Assumption Parish were halted Tuesday after seismic monitors noted an increase in the kind of underground tremors linked with past burps and edge collapses in the yawning slurry hole, state regulators said. [...] Over the past 24 hours, seismic monitors have been picking up an increase in underground fluid movement near the failed Texas Brine Co. LLC cavern, officials said. [...]
It's all about the 'vibe'
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 12:03 PM

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watch this.... Ea games = they know!
 Quoting: Dead space 3 bitches! 1606957


Yes it indeed seems that they used some BEZERK ingredients to create a new fear, a fear that mobilises and spreads.

In my interpretation relating to us here :

Deep in the GOM they had discovered an ancient relict, that we call AUgie here. Remember that OP talked about the people who had 'The Mark' ... To me they are those that can interact and connect with this relict in a special way, and are those who can carry the vibe further [not Gate-keepers, but Seed-keepers of sorts]. They have the ability to "REBUILD or DESTROY" Their ability can be used against this relict to destroy it (* TPTB/Elites think) or to help it.

As I suggested, the relict that we have called AUgie and [where/what it is part of] is on more LIFE-BEARING planets then ours.

The Statue-thing in the vid looks like 2 twisted strains/horns in a helixal way ... Refering to the fact that this is DNA related.

In the story they have MIXED AUgie & Synthia ! [imo]
Synthia is the organism that overtakes and which makes us zombie-like .. which INFECTS !

There was a shot where a few RIGS were on fire ... fingerpointing to DWH that blew up.

And at the end they refer back to Earth, now 200 years later, covered under ICE to shield and blanket IT, to put it into stacis ... cocoon it in ice and cold ...
Just like Project DEEP FREEZE ....




Nice find AC Canada hf

xxx MzK
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 12:31 PM

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Last one for today, promiss..


Department of Energy Halts Destructive Richton Salt Dome Project




For Immediate Release: September 21, 2011
Contact:
Raleigh Hoke, Raleigh@healthygulf.org, 504-525-1528, ext. 204
Eric Richards, e.richards@vthm.com, 228-762-0814


On September 9th, 2011, the Department of Energy announced the cancellation of the last ongoing environmental study for the Richton salt dome project, effectively halting any further progress on the project. This irresponsible oil storage scheme would have required the removal of 50 million gallons of water a day from the Pascagoula River for five to six years to dissolve underground salt deposits. The extremely salty, polluted byproduct from this process would have then been discharged south of Horn Island, potentially creating a large dead zone where little sea life could survive.

”I commend the Department of Energy on their decision,” said Raleigh Hoke, Mississippi Organizer for the Gulf Restoration Network. “The people who live, work, and play in South Mississippi rely on a healthy Pascagoula River and Mississippi Sound and they shouldn’t be forced to sacrifice these amazing resources for a destructive and expensive boondoggle like the Richton salt dome project.”

Since the Richton project was first proposed, a large and diverse coalition of concerned citizens, and community and conservation groups have weighed in against this environmentally and economically damaging project. Hundreds of individuals attended hearings to call for a halt to the Richton salt dome project, and thousands of people signed petitions or wrote emails urging the Department of Energy to cancel it. Ultimately, this effort paid off.

“Hearing that the project is officially dead for now is great news to the Gulf Conservation Coalition and virtually everyone in South Mississippi. The civics lesson that this event provides is that a single voice of reason may have difficulty being heard. Hundreds or thousands of like voices get heard, and can accomplish great things,” said Eric Richards, Spokesperson for the Gulf Conservation Coalition.

To view the Department of Energy’s official release on the cancellation of the Richton salt dome project’s Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, visit this site: [link to www.gpo.gov]



They be everywhere. Did you see the language used? Irresponsible, danger, damaging....

And the mighty Mississipi is at her lowest levels since the droughts in the 80's.

Where's all that water being diverted I wonder? Making more domes into reserves to store or move current reserves in unstable areas?

Quenching the New Madrid fault line?

Being pumped in to unstable caverns created by fracking, in order to stabilise the strata?
 Quoting: BadHairDay



Yes that could well be ...

What jumped in my mind reading the above is this :

Was the DWH blow-out just a distraction and an opportunity created for 2 things :
- Coz they were already dissolving these salt-domes in Macondo, the water became over-salted and [like described above] this started to cauze major DEAD-ZONES that couldnt be explained by normal singular events. Thus THEY created one ! The oil-disaster would cover up the salt-table increase, the area would be labled toxic and dangerous, thus tests were off the agenda ... by leaking oil the standard procedure is dump corexit ... corexit contained extra Iron which boosted the growth of [artificial?] algae and Synthia. In a matter of time no one would strumble across the dead-zones anymore, coz that [those that stayed] would be blamed to the oil and chemicals ...

Perrrrrfect !!!

The massif amounths of released salt could have also be a trigger on which AUgie responded and not only the neutrino-call as we also showed.

It might be so that AUgie responds in a similar way to environmental changes just like the Jelly-fish ...
The release of salt in the seawaters changed the electromagnetic resonance, and just like Jelly's she responded to this phenomenon ...
I think it was an unexpected encounter for TPTB, who DO and DID know of its existence beneath the ice in the Polar-area's.


How the fracking could tie into this EM chain-reaction is at this moment not clear.
I dont think that AUgie responds to breaking up rocks and soil,
but she does responds to changes in SALT.

Like PPPI freshed us up, the OA polar-organism (Tasman Sea & GOM) cant survive without salt ...
our bodies cant survive without salt !!!
Earth and this primordial organism/fluid/substance cant eighter ...
If our body lacks salt, rescue-teams come to restore unless the damage is to great and total failure is the result,
the same goes for Earth/Mother Nature ...

Potassium is also a kind of salt and is tied in into the process of radioactive decay in Earth's crust/mantle ...

Fresh water and Salt are the key-ingredients for Life in this realm and on this planet.



xxxMzK
Krispy71

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02/27/2013 01:03 PM

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This is long, but worth the read. Do any US bezerkers remember this? How come we havent covered it before? Spinners and cleaners at work....

** I have highlighted some interesting text.


Twenty years ago this morning, like most who lived within an hour's drive of Wesley — 7 miles south of Brenham — I was awakened by a loud noise. Thunder? Car wreck? Airplane crash? Within minutes, my city editor called, telling me something exploded in our coverage area and serious injuries were involved. His orders: Grab your map, get on the road to Brenham, check in once there.

Fire trucks from surrounding areas sailed past me on F.M. 50. On the radio, some speculated that the disaster involved a pipeline rupture. Seemed plausible; Texas is the largest domestic producer of oil in the United States andpipelines criss-cross our cities like spaghetti on plate.

Once at a pay phone attached to a convenience store (cell phones were a luxury in the early 90s and The Eagle had zero), my city editor instructed me that I'd be writing about whatever I saw, whatever I learned. As I turned from Texas 109 onto County Road 19, the damage was increasingly obvious. I'm from Omaha, Neb., and what unfolded on either side of County Road 19 is what we saw after a tornado chewed up a neighborhood: Houses off the foundation in jumbled piles, tattered bedding and clothing high in trees stripped of lush spring leaves, mangled belongings and residents standing amid the rubble of what once was their home.

I was surprised as I approached Ground Zero that no one stopped me in my four-door Toyota Corolla. It was my fifth month and first stint at the newspaper, but I didn't have a press pass, let alone business cards. I, however, was the very last of their worries. Emergency management officials at the scene acknowledged to me that they didn't even know a gas storage facility holding liquified petroleum gas — ethane, propane and butane — resided in their community.

It was awkward to walk into the lives of these people who were going through unimaginable pain and ask them to share their thoughts with me. Their concerns. The relief that they were fine. But, that's what journalists do, so I tried to stay out of their way and respect their grief while getting details about near-misses and it-could-have-been-me-or-my-child.

I learned from a volunteer firefighter that a young Brenham police officer found the lifeless body of a blue-eyed, blonde-haired 5-year-old boy named Derrick Meinen. His mother, they said, was taken by helicopter to Hermann Hospital in Houston. Meanwhile, a resident told me about three other lives in danger: A mother and her adult daughter were burned over 60 percent of their body when their car was flattened by the explosion; the 3-year-old child in the car was burned as well. All were taken to a Houston hospital.

I filled up my notebook with stories told by strangers with a definite sadness in their eyes. Everyone knew each other in this hilly countryside painted with wildflowers in each yard, along each road. A place that until that morning was considered a slice of paradise.

A volunteer firefighter took me close to where the fireball tore through the car carrying three generations of the Diver-Medve family. The charred ground rolled out in either direction, paths that easily could be followed by scanning the tree line whipped by fire. That same firefighter took me down the driveway last traveled by the mother and daughter, then showed me the remains of the Meinen home. Everything was in pieces, including appliances. Imagine being able to hold the largest remaining part of a washing machine in one hand. Torn pictures, books and paperwork littered their field. Nearby, several of their cows lay dead.

No family milled about there. They were at the hospital in Houston where Jane would remain in a drug-induced coma until Mother's Day the next month. She missed his funeral, the heavy media coverage, the lawyers. Every day her loving husband, Alan, would tell her their only child died; every night she would forget. Mother's Day was when the bad dream didn't fade, but instead became a waking nightmare that's never slipped away.

Similar feelings of horrific loss were felt in the Medve and Diver families as both Delores, 27, and her 46-year-old mother, Gloria, died within five days of the disaster. Delores' son, Travis, suffered burns over 30 percent of his body, but recovered, at least physically. Two husbands lost their wives; a father lost his daughter; a boy, his mother.

Over the next few years, I followed up with stories on those families and many of the nearly two dozen who were injured. I covered state and federal hearings that highlighted a lack of government oversight and corporate greed. Somewhere along the way, I developed a friendship with the Meinens, a couple who taught me about grace, forgiveness, determination, selflessness and love.

On this, the 20th annniversary of this tragedy that changed so many lives forever, it didn't seem right to again ask these families to relive a pain that I'm certain they're reminded of every day.

So, instead, what follows is not just the ramifications of the explosion, but what unfolded April 7, 1992 in a community that will never forget what they lost or how.

Before the sun came up on April 7, 1992, an alarm sounded at Mid-America's 24-hour monitoring station in Tulsa, Okla. A sensor warned a dispatcher that there was hazardous gas escaping from an underground storage cavern — a salt dome — about 475 miles away in rural Wesley, Texas, about 60 miles from Houston.

Three dispatchers in Tulsa monitored the company’s 10,000 miles of pipeline, along with its gas storage facilities. The one in Wesley was unattended 16 hours each day and was operated by Seminole Pipeline Co., a subsidiary of Mid-America Pipeline.

A minute after the first alarm came at 6:09 that Tuesday morning, one of the dispatchers called a 28-year-old Seminole worker who lived in Brenham and asked him to go to the facility to investigate the source of the alarm. Both the dispatcher and the worker — neither of whom had ever practiced responding to a disaster in a mock situation — assumed if the cavern overfilled with gas that a safety system would shut it down automatically and seal the cavern, preventing vapors from escaping into the air.

Not in a rush, the worker took a shower, dressed, stopped at a convenience store for a Diet Coke and arrived at the cavern about 20 minutes later. He immediately noticed a large cloud of what looked like fog engulfing the facility. He tried to turn off the engine of his diesel truck, but the motor kept running on the airborne gas vapor.

He realized he couldn’t make it to the facility’s manual shut-off valve, so retreated to a house of a nearby resident. He called back to dispatch and mentioned there was gas in the field (but not beyond), then called his supervisor, who ordered the worker to evacuate the area and get to safety, staying far from the vapor cloud.

The residents who lent their phone told him that a school bus was expected down County Road 19, so he ignored his boss's instruction and headed into the vapor cloud, attempting to stop the bus and get to the main facility to shut off the gas. When mixed with oxygen, the worker knew that natural gas liquid vapors are extremely flammable and capable of explosive ignition.

He came across two other Seminole employees at the entrance and the trio all headed to the shut-off valve — it would be the only way to stop the gas from flowing out of the cavern.

The men were forced out of the area because too much gas had escaped and it was flooding out of the facility. The safety trailer that had emergency breathing apparatus and equipment needed to shut down the facility was 90 miles away in Sugar Land.

A flare could have ignited the escaping gas long before it accumulated into this massive cloud hugging the ground, but the common technique wasn’t used at this site.

It was about that time that the worker watched headlights of a car disappear into the vapor cloud.

By then, 27 gas alarms had sounded in Tulsa and the dispatcher who originally spoke to the worker didn’t wait for him to call back. He didn't realize the magnitude of the situation and left the building when his shift ended.

No one from Tulsa or Seminole dialed 911. No firefighters or other emergency responders had been alerted.

Jane Meinen did make that critical call though.

The 911 operator could hardly hear Jane explain that she smelled gas because of a whistling noise at the plant, which was just several hundred yards from the mobile home she shared with her husband, Alan, and 5-year-old son, Derrick. Their’s was the closest residence to the facility.

Jane gave details that few likely would be able to remember in such a situation — she recalled the name of the company that operated the facility and that the emergency number was out of Tulsa. Her husband was at work at the Coke bottling plant in Brenham; her son, still asleep in his bed.

Her neighbors a few acres away already were in their car, driving down a gravel and dirt driveway toward County Road 19. Gloria Diver, who worked the front desk at the local hospital, was with her daughter, Delores Medve, while her 3-year-old grandson, Travis Medve, was laying down in the backseat.

Headlights from that car were what the Seminole employee had watched disappear into the vapor cloud that was disguised as morning fog.

Seconds later, the cloud exploded with the estimated force of a three-kiloton bomb. The blast registered between 3.5 and 4.0 on the Richter scale and was felt as far away as San Antonio.

Derrick's lifeless body was found by a police officer who responded to the scene within minutes. Jane, who was wearing a back brace because she was recovering from surgery, was discovered in what once was her rose bed.

More than 60 buildings within 3 square miles of the station were damaged and dozens of homes were destroyed, including those lived in by the Meinens, Medves and Divers. It later would be estimated that $9 million in damage was caused by the explosion.

Here’s what investigators learned in the weeks and months that followed:

The salt dome began construction of the salt dome cavern in 1980 and periodiically increased the facility's storage capacity by "washing" the cavern with fresh water, which carved out a huge cavern increased the capacity. A year later, the company obtained a permit from the Texas Railroad Commission to use the cavern as a storage faiclity for up to 150,000 barrels of natural gas liquids. Over the next 10 years, however, it more than doubled that amount to about 336,000 barrels.

• The company emptied the cavern an average of 16 times per year from 1982 through 1991, but for a reason never explained they stopped mid-way through 1991. During the first seven months of 1991, the cavern was emptied eight times. But not even once in the nine months leading up to the explosion.

• The volume of product reached an all-time high just 27 days before the accident. Staffers questioned the estimate since it hadn’t been emptied for nine months and an employee was told to “sit” at the cavern overnight to watch for signs of an overfill as the amount going in was reduced.

• Eight days before the blast, Seminole officials met to discuss the fact there were a series of serious miscalculations on how much liquefied petroleum gas was in the cavern, so a supervisor suggested they empty it. That request was disregarded, the cavern was not emptied, inventory calibrations were not reset and more natural gas liquids were pumped beneath the ground.

• The safety system that was supposed to shut down and close the cavern was poorly designed and wasn't properly maintained. The safety switch was rebuilt from used parts, yet it was the only automated safety device capable of stopping the situation.

Investigations by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Texas Railroad Commission renewed concerns about the safety of salt domes used to house natural gases. Hearings were held in Austin and Washington D.C., including several at which Jane Meinen testified, telling not just about her loss and the long-term injuries she'd suffer, but about the education she acquired on how government allowed an industry to go unregulated.

Both inquiries pointed out that it wasn't caused by one solitary failure. The companies involved were using infallible technology and didn't appreciate the role humans have in a highly technical system, but also there was an arrogance among managers and owners who believed they held an inherent superiority to government regulations and sound operating practices, the NTSB found.

Simply put, it was a trade off between revenue and safety. Money won.

It wasn't just mechanical failures and human errors, it was organizational failings caused by a company culture that didn't make safety paramount, didn't train its responders and dispatchers, didn't encourage safe operations and didn't provide communication training or tools for its employees. The system was loaded with opportunities for failure.

Here's a number that speaks for itself: More than 700 errors were made by operators using incorrect temperature and pressure correction factors in their cacluations at the salt dome over a 270-day period.

NTSB investigators dug deep in pursuit of making sure that the same mistakes weren't made over and over again. They recommended greater safety controls after pointing out that there were no federal regulations governing salt domes and no requirements given by state government.

That government indifference was part of the problem. It took five years, but finally the U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration issued an advisory to operators of gas and hazardous liquid underground storage facilities: Henceforth, they were were required to create design guidelines and operation guidelines for salt domes, efforts that long ago should have been made mandatory.

The lessons learned by the industry that day live on, at least for the NTSB which still points to it as a way to learn about bad corporate culture and what happens when safety is an afterthought.

Though investigations got to the bottom of what went wrong and top management was made to publicly admit they mismanaged that site, and even though millions of dollars were paid out in settlements to those impacted by negligence, the explosion that shook Wesley and swallowed three lives can never be fully explained away.

An industry that produces the most revenue in Texas and brings in among the largest bonuses for its leaders should have been more accountable. Instead, they jotted down the 'lessons learned' and moved on down the road.

Today, there is no big memorial service like there was on the one-year anniversary. Nothing on the local newspaper's website about it. Those who survived and those who lost loved ones 20 years ago today grieve and remember in their own way, as it should be.


[link to www.theeagle.com]


Written last year.

The highlighted section where the emergency management people 'had no idea their town was situated above such a storage cavern' will be re-itterated across the US methinks.

Reserves can only be quoted because they know how much volume is in them.

Ther are hundreds, if not thousands of these reserves dotted along the coastlines, and further in land around mostly salt dome structures, many of which, like the Napoleon Dome, contain multiple reserves, with various hydrocarbon products, and toxic materials.
 Quoting: BadHairDay


Horrible story ... but very enlightening for us ...


Snip from above:
the emergency management people 'had no idea their town was situated above such a storage cavern'

Before the sun came up on April 7, 1992, an alarm sounded at Mid-America's 24-hour monitoring station in Tulsa, Okla. A sensor warned a dispatcher that there was hazardous gas escaping from an underground storage cavern — a salt dome — about 475 miles away in rural Wesley, Texas, about 60 miles from Houston.

[...]

A minute after the first alarm came at 6:09 that Tuesday morning, one of the dispatchers called a 28-year-old Seminole worker who lived in Brenham and asked him to go to the facility to investigate the source of the alarm. Both the dispatcher and the worker — neither of whom had ever practiced responding to a disaster in a mock situation — assumed if the cavern overfilled with gas that a safety system would shut it down automatically and seal the cavern, preventing vapors from escaping into the air.

Not in a rush, the worker took a shower, dressed, stopped at a convenience store for a Diet Coke and arrived at the cavern about 20 minutes later. He immediately noticed a large cloud of what looked like fog engulfing the facility. He tried to turn off the engine of his diesel truck, but the motor kept running on the airborne gas vapor.



Wow that the car kept on working on the vapor !!!!

Awefull to think what can happen to many of those "storage-cavities" ... How ignorant and arrogant is the gvt ????


tnx BHD for the share hf


xxMzK
Anonymous Coward
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02/27/2013 11:57 PM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
BHD, have you got a cousin over here posting?

Thread: Military helicopters training over Raleigh scaring people now ------ WTF IS GOING WITH ALL THIS!!!
Anonymous Coward
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02/28/2013 12:21 AM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
wave


Is THIS what they have done to JAPAN - Fukushima ???


‘Tsunami Bomb’ Tested Off New Zealand Coast
[removed link, glp did not like it ..]

snips:
- The United States and New Zealand conducted secret tests of a “tsunami bomb” designed to destroy coastal cities by using underwater blasts to trigger massive tidal waves.

- The tests were carried out in waters around New Caledonia and Auckland during the Second World War and showed that the weapon was feasible and a series of 10 large offshore blasts could potentially create a 33-foot tsunami capable of inundating a small city. **

- top secret operation, code-named “Project Seal

- Experts concluded that single explosions were not powerful enough and a successful tsunami bomb would require about 2 million kilograms of explosive arrayed in a line about five miles from shore.




** If they were capable of doing that in WW2,
just imagine what they are capable of now ....


Now remember what OP/Aco said about bombs, explosives and dual key's to ignite them ???
I think here we have again something that seems to prove a part of what we discussed here in Bezerk.

Japan was deliberately attacted, by a tsunami-bomb.


xxxMzK
 Quoting: Krispy71


Much like the Boxer Day Tsunami in 2004. But don't be mislead. If that tsunami was intentional, and there are indications this is true, it was not the US that did it. I suggest that because a major US and UK military base was destroyed at Diego Garcia by that tsunami. Never mind looking for a link. There is none.

As bad as the US appears to be with its aggression and war on other people, there are other countries/factions out there who are just as bad, or worse. The US and Japan are allies, so take the pointing finger and do a 180.
talkstory

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02/28/2013 04:04 AM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
I find it interesting that the water memory info is so astounding to some. I would seem that the whole of creation is in some form like a memory stick, depending on its present state. Only a few years back people were into crystal for that same reason. All the vibration influences they were subjected to during their creation, would seem to be held as memories that some have attained the ability to interpret. Hmmm

Water hold memory and so. ts
talkstory
BadHairDay

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02/28/2013 04:31 AM
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Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
TS... rken.. yeah, the experiencial/story side is great eh. We just love stories, thrive on them, pay billions to watch them, be part of them, base religions around them and so on.

We just love learning stuff.

My personal view is that we are one with this world, and pop out as Humans to discover and experience new things for the entire planetary conciousness. Then we pop back.

Its that interconnectedness we have been led to forget.

So, if we have the mind set of forgetting, and physically, we are disconnected too, via drugs, pollution, bad food, oil in everything, what does that make us? (if you subscribe to us belonging to a planetary conciousness)

What happens if we all disconnect? Just how much is us on our own, or swinging towards a different vibration, and how much is left of the old gal? (plenty, I assume) But it must make a difference to how things harmonise.

The biggest common ground is still water. But even that has been used as a delivery of bad stuff.

I still think WE will be OK. Just you and me, no-one else.

Sorry folks. The rest of you are doomed.

No, but seriously, I think all of us who are supposed to be here on this world, will be OK - those who hum a different tune might not fare so well...

Just an opinion.
It's all about the 'vibe'

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