Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 1,504 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 156,303
Pageviews Today: 219,587Threads Today: 57Posts Today: 1,376
01:55 AM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 900755
United States
07/04/2010 01:08 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Would someone explain again what the is mistrel is?



[link to en.wikipedia.org]
 Quoting: SotoZen 1023520



Thank you !
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1024213
Greece
07/04/2010 01:13 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Arctic Governance Project

Steering Committee (doesn't the BLNBRG have one of those?25plp)

Hans Corell was Under-Secretary-General for Legal Affairs and the Legal Counsel of the United Nations from March 1994 to March 2004.

'are these 2 brothers?'

Robert Corell is the Principal for the Global Environment & Technology Foundation, and represents the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment in the Arctic Governance Project.

Udloriak Hanson is a Senior Policy Liaison for Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. She has also served as Executive Director for Qaujisaqtiit Society, representing Inuit non-profit organizations, and within the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut as Executive Director to the Minister of Sustainable Development

Paula Kankaanpää has been Director of the Arctic Centre of the University of Lapland, Finland since 2000, where she acted also as Vice-Rector in 2006-09.

Jacqueline McGlade is Executive Director of the European Environment Agency, Copenhagen, Denmark. Professor McGlade is a recipient of numerous awards including the Masaryk Gold Medal and Minerva Award.

Tony Penikett's 30-year career in public service included 18 years in the Yukon Legislative Assembly as a Member for Whitehorse West, two terms as Premier of the Yukon Territory, two terms as National President (chair) of the New Democratic Party (SI) of Canada and 6 years as a senior official in the Governments of Saskatchewan and British Columbia, where he served as Deputy Minister (State Secretary) of Negotiations and later, Labour.

Stanley Senner currently serves as Director of Conservation Science for the Ocean Conservancy. He spent the last decade as Executive Director of Audubon Alaska, and served as Alaska Representative of The Wilderness Society during passage of the Alaska Lands Act. He also worked on the professional staff of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries and spent more than 7 years coordinating restoration and science programs for the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council.

Nodari Simoniya currently serves as the Director for Energy Studies at the Institute for World Economy, Russian Academy of Sciences. He is also Professor of the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (University), Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Professor Simoniya has published more than 17 books and 250 articles on Asia-Pacific regional issues

Oran Young is a Professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California at Santa Barbara. He conducts research on the roles that institutions play in governing human-environment relations

more here: [link to www.arcticgovernance.org]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 780295
United States
07/04/2010 01:14 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
So, Russia now owns the Mistral, but haven't got the ship yet? Interesting. Is this right?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 900755
United States
07/04/2010 01:15 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Are we famous or what, lol.
[link to forum.prisonplanet.com] j/k
SR37
User ID: 1019703
United States
07/04/2010 01:15 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Here is international laws regarding deep sea mining and even mentions 'black smokers'. LOTS of information here, PLEASE READ IT ALL, it applies to not only biomass but GOLD!! And also note the parts I highlight THROUGHOUT the link. Also think about what BP is doing... They are CAPTURING the "oil" from the deap sea to the surface. This discusses the dangers of bringing up water from the deep sea bed.



[link to www.mpi.org.au]

Abstract
Interest in deep-sea mining developed in the early 1970’s, with a focus on manganese nodules in international waters. Mining may actually occur first, however, on rich polymetallic sulfide deposits associated with
hydrothermal vents within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs).

Even though mining for polymetallic sulfides may not take place for several years, precautionary performance standards, environmental regulations,
and the establishment of Marine Protected Areas may help guide the marine mining industry toward a goal of minimizing environmental impacts. Once substantial investments in prospecting and exploring a
potential mining site are made, implementation of environmental regulations may prove to be much more difficult.


Key Words
Deep-sea mining, hydrothermal vents, manganese nodules, Marine
Protected Areas, polymetallic sulfide deposits, precautionary
management.
3
1. A brief history of deep-sea mining
Interest in deep-sea mining of manganese nodules and other metal
deposits developed in the early 1970’s as a result of rising metal prices,
and out of concern for securing supplies of strategic and critical minerals.
Predicted metal shortages did not materialize, however, and metal prices
have remained at relatively low levels.1 In addition, high projected costs
associated with mining manganese nodules inhibited nodule mining
efforts.
The regulatory environment for deep-sea mining may have also
contributed to the failure of early attempts to exploit manganese nodules.
Part XI of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the sea (UNCLOS)
established an international legal regime governing deep-sea mining.
However, several industrialised countries, including the United States, did
not endorse the original 1982 Convention because they considered it to be
an obstacle to the practical development of ocean mineral resources.
However, in 1996, the Convention, as modified by a 1994 Agreement
relating to the Implementation of Part XI, entered into force.



*****NOTE THIS PART*****
The International Seabed Authority (ISA), established under UNCLOS, is responsible for ensuring that the benefits of mining in international waters beyond the outer limit of the legal Continental Shelf are equitably shared,
with an emphasis on ensuring a fair stream of benefits to developing countries and the protection of the environment from harmful effects arising from mining activities in international areas.

However, one of the most important impacts of the Authority’s restrictions appears to be the
redirection of prospecting and exploration away from international waters and into areas within the limits of national jurisdiction (Continental Shelf
and EEZ) where regulations may be weaker or non-existent.
******NOTE THIS PART*******



2. Nature, distribution and economic importance of polymetallic sulfide deposits Polymetallic sulfide deposits are formed by hot (up to 350o C) seawater
rising through the seafloor and precipitating leached metals in the form of submarine chimneys ('black smokers’) or domes. The resulting massive sulfide deposits can reach considerable size ranging from several thousand to about 100 million tons.3 Frequently, polymetallic sulfides are
associated with mid-ocean ridges. However, recent discoveries have been made at relatively shallow depths (100m to 2000m) in backarc spreading centers.1, 4-5 Many of these deposits are located within EEZs
(Japan, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea), leading to the suggestion that mining of such deposits may become technically and economically feasible in the relatively near future.

6-8
Polymetallic sulfide deposits are highly enriched in gold, copper, and base metals.5 For example, the recently discovered Sunrise deposit off Japan contains 20 ppm of gold, relative to a content of 0.5 ppm in an average
deposit of similar geology.9 Sulfides from the Conical Seamount off Papua New Guinea (2.8 km basal diameter at 1,600 m water depth) have an average gold content of 26 ppm, with a maximum content in excess of 230
5
ppm (based on 40 samples).1 This is about 10 times the average value for economically mineable gold deposits on land.3 Mining technology for extracting polymetallic sulfides has not been fully
developed as yet. It is envisioned, however, that mining would be
conducted using large remotely-controlled hydraulic grabs or continuous
mining systems with cutter heads and airlift.3 Unlike broad-scale
manganese nodule mining, efforts to extract polymetallic sulfides will
concentrate on individual mound-like deposits ranging up to the size of
Capitol Hill.
3. Trends that are increasing interest in polymetallic sulfides
Several trends appear to be increasing interest in deep-sea polymetallic
sulfide mining: 1) advances in remote sensing, positioning, and
underwater technology7; 2) the discovery of gold and silver deposits near
hydrothermal vents in shallower water1, 7, 9; and 3) a move away from
prospecting in highly regulated international seabed areas, toward
activities within the EEZs of several countries (e.g, Papua New Guinea
and Fiji). Currently, several private companies are proceeding with plans
to prospect for deep-sea mineral deposits.6
The first polymetallic sulfide deposits reported within EEZs were
discovered in the southwest Pacific in the mid-1980’s.3 Since sulfide deposits within EEZs do not fall under the jurisdiction of the International
Seabed Authority, ISA fees, environmental regulations, and technology transfer provisions do not apply, perhaps accelerating the development of
polymetallic sulfide mining.

Recently, Papua New Guinea issued an exploration license to Nautilus Minerals Corp. for finding and mining high-grade seafloor polymetallic sulfide deposits within an area of about 5,000 square miles of its EEZ.1,10
6
Nautilus plans to extract 10,000 tons of polymetallic sulfide mineral
deposits within two years, as part of the exploration, and to begin
commercial mining by 2003. Sample ores contain up to 26% zinc, 15%
copper, with 200 g of silver and about 30 g of gold to the ton.11
Furthermore, the Metal Mining Agency of Japan has begun a 5-year study
of the feasibility of mining a large sulfide deposit in the Okinawa Trough.
Industry analysts indicate that the economic prospects for mining
polymetallic sulfide deposits associated with hydrothermal vents are
increasing, and that mining operations could start within 5 to 10 years.6-7,11
4. Potential Environmental Impacts
Although it is now thought that hydrothermal vents may have been the
cradle of life on earth, the unique biological communities associated with
them were discovered quite recently (in 1979). These communities,
making up the world’s only fully chemosynthetic ecosystems, are very
productive, ranking with estuaries and salt marshes. They are oases of
very high biomass in the deep sea. Most vent animals, including giant
tube worms, clams, and crabs, are new to science and found nowhere
else. The high productivity, the degree of endemism, and other unique
characteristics of vent communities give them high intrinsic value. Unique
vent species may, in the future, be of use for biotechnology purposes.12
The Manus Basin north of Papua New Guinea is the first location other
than a mid-ocean spreading axis where hydrothermal 'chimney’ deposits
and associated vent fauna have been discovered.13 A hydrothermal field in
the Manus Basin, which is targeted for mining, supports an exceptionally
abundant biological community dependent on chemosynthetic bacteria.14
7
Some mining industry representatives have acknowledged the
environmental sensitivity of vent ecosystems and have pledged to avoid
large scale destruction of habitats. Published interviews6, 11, 15 suggest
that many in the mining industry and some in the scientific community
share a perception that sulfide deposit mining poses fewer environmental
risks than does terrestrial mining. This perception appears to be based on
several assumptions: 1) mining would not occur directly on vents, due to
the hazardous conditions there; 2) sulfide deposits are not covered by
thick layers of sediment, which could otherwise give rise to a destructive
sediment plume; 3) the high density of sulfide particles will cause
immediate redeposition of mining debris; and 4) vent communities are
relatively ephemeral, reducing the risk of long-term damage (some have
compared sulfide mining to farming6).
While it seems clear that miners would avoid active vents (due to
hazardous conditions), direct impacts on biological communities peripheral
to vents and indirect impacts on vent communities themselves remain
possibilities. Significant biological communities occur near cool or cold
vents, as well as at hot vents.16 Crabs and other vent organisms have
been observed quite far from actual vents, and may use large ranges for
feeding.4 The Marine Minerals Service of the US Department of Interior
concluded that a major fraction of the benthic life around vents would be
destroyed by mining nearby.

Last Edited by Mister Obvious on 01/20/2014 10:36 PM
RenegadeSon

User ID: 1024993
United States
07/04/2010 01:16 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
So, Russia now owns the Mistral, but haven't got the ship yet? Interesting. Is this right?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 780295

Russia is buying a 'Mistral' class ship from the French..not the Mistral itself.

Last Edited by RenegadeSon on 07/04/2010 01:16 PM
Hildoflight
User ID: 1025068
United States
07/04/2010 01:16 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
A suggestion: OP stated his messages would be "some for you and some for code." Then some of us began looking for code messages in the dots, and OP suddenly had a problem. Perhaps we should not post whatever we think those dots mean, and just stick to the words which are meant for GLP.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1022186

Exactly!!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 780295
United States
07/04/2010 01:18 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
So, Russia now owns the Mistral, but haven't got the ship yet? Interesting. Is this right?

Russia is buying a 'Mistral' class ship from the French..not the Mistral itself.
 Quoting: RenegadeSon

TY
SotoZen
User ID: 1023520
United States
07/04/2010 01:19 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Interesting; clearly the French have very different (and tested) ideas about oil spill cleanup.

[link to www.marketwatch.com]

Quote:
"It is also notable that in the "Use Of Sorbents for Spill Response," published in 2009 and Commissioned by the Maritime Affairs Directorate, and the French Navy, it has been determined that bulk sorbents (MOP is in this category) is the choice for Weathered Emulsified Crude Oil which is the specific application in the Gulf."

Link to French Navy prepared document:

[link to www.cedre.fr]
Housedad

User ID: 1003657
United States
07/04/2010 01:20 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
I've been playing with the mores. Could it be a palindrome?
There's always an Arquillian Battle Cruiser, or a Corillian Death Ray, or an intergalactic plague that is about to wipe out all life on this miserable little planet, and the only way these people can get on with their happy lives is that they DO NOT KNOW ABOUT IT!

-Men in Black
Housedad

User ID: 1003657
United States
07/04/2010 01:20 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
That is playing with the morse.....
There's always an Arquillian Battle Cruiser, or a Corillian Death Ray, or an intergalactic plague that is about to wipe out all life on this miserable little planet, and the only way these people can get on with their happy lives is that they DO NOT KNOW ABOUT IT!

-Men in Black
Krispy71

User ID: 962920
Netherlands
07/04/2010 01:22 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Helium-3 is a primordial component in the Earth's crust, is deposited via solar wind on moons and asteroids.

WIKI :
Helium-3, as an isotope, was postulated to be radioactive ... > radioactive tarballs !!!!!

The presence of helium-3 in underground gas deposits implied that it either did not decay or had an extremely long half-life compatible with a primordial isotope


Due to the lower atomic mass of helium-3 (3.0160293 amu), it has significantly different properties from helium-4 (4.0026 amu). Because of the weak induced dipole-dipole interaction between helium atoms, their physical properties are mainly determined by zero point energy (groundstate kinetic energy), and the lower mass of helium-3 causes it to have higher zero point energy, which means helium-3 can overcome dipole-dipole interaction with less thermal energy than helium-4. Helium-3 boils at 3.19 kelvin compared to helium-4's 4.23 K, and its critical point is also lower at 3.35 K, compared to helium-4's 5.19 K. It has less than half the density when liquid at its boiling point: 0.059 g/ml compared to helium-4's 0.12473 g/ml at one atmosphere. Its latent heat of vaporization is also considerably lower at 0.026 kJ/mol compared to helium-4's 0.0829 kJ/mol.[4]

[link to books.google.com]

Some helium-3 leaks up through deep-sourced hotspot
volcanoes
such as those of the Hawaiian islands

Around subduction zones, various sources produce helium-3 in natural gas deposits which possibly contain a thousand tonnes of helium-3 (although there may be 25 thousand tonnes if all ancient subduction zones have such deposits). Wittenberg estimated that United States crustal natural gas sources may have only half a tonne total.[32] Wittenberg cited Anderson's estimate of another 1200 metric tonnes in interplanetary dust particles on the ocean floors


(Magnetised water > ??? maby coz of / for )

The nuclei of some atoms (such as He-3, but not He-4) have an intrinsic spin. In a magnetized (or "polarized") gas, these spins can be lined up in the same direction, by various means. After this, like gyroscopes, the nuclei continue to spin with their axes pointed toward one direction in space, regardless of the direction of changing motions of the gas atoms that contain them.

Polarized (also referred to as hyperpolarized) helium-3 gas may be produced directly, using lasers of the appropriate frequency. With the use of a thin layer of protective cesium metal on the inside of gas cylinders, the magnetized gas may then be stored at pressures of 10 atm, for up to 100 hours. When inhaled, mixtures containing the gas can be imaged with an MRI-like scanner which produces breath by breath images of lung ventilation, in real-time. Applications of this experimental technique are just beginning to be explored





B3 ...?
B-fase of helium3 ???
Magnetic field ....

In zero magnetic field, there are two distinct superfluid phases of 3He, the A-phase and the B-phase. The B-phase is the low-temperature, low-pressure phase which has an isotropic energy gap. The A-phase is the higher temperature, higher pressure phase that is further stabilized by a magnetic field and has two point nodes in its gap. The presence of two phases is a clear indication that 3He is an unconventional superfluid (superconductor), since the presence of two phases requires an additional symmetry, other than gauge symmetry, to be broken.

Last Edited by Mister Obvious on 01/20/2014 10:37 PM
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 780295
United States
07/04/2010 01:22 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Interesting; clearly the French have very different (and tested) ideas about oil spill cleanup.

[link to www.marketwatch.com]

Quote:
"It is also notable that in the "Use Of Sorbents for Spill Response," published in 2009 and Commissioned by the Maritime Affairs Directorate, and the French Navy, it has been determined that bulk sorbents (MOP is in this category) is the choice for Weathered Emulsified Crude Oil which is the specific application in the Gulf."

Link to French Navy prepared document:

[link to www.cedre.fr]
 Quoting: SotoZen 1023520

you know, if i were the French, which i partly am, i would be curious too. our Prez wants no help from our Allies? who have good ideas? put aside the ego in times of tragedy please. Clinton said he would have graciously accepted help from our foreign allies. What gives Barry?
SotoZen
User ID: 1023520
United States
07/04/2010 01:22 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Hmmmm, why aren't we using this?

"Regarding the Gulf Oil Spill; MOP Environmental's patented product MOP Maximum Oil Pickup has the ability to capture and contain the Gulf Oil Spill at its source and all locations out to its furthest perimeter including the marshlands and beaches. Where the oil has landed on beaches or land it will separate and remove the oil from the soil, or sand on site quickly. MOP Environmental's oil-only pickup product is called MOP Maximum Oil Pickup. MOP floats, is all natural, it is safe to the environment including birds, animals, and aquatic life. It is rapidly deployed at over 150 mph using MOP Environmental's MOP-Cannon and removed using their MOP-Vac. MOP is applied above water or below water where it floats up and locks in oil, completely neutralizing all potential harmful effects of the spilled oil. It is the only known oil recovery method that will work under all weather conditions. The oil can be retrieved for re-use where the resulting profit is greater than the expense of cleanup."

[link to www.marketwired.com]

Last Edited by Mister Obvious on 01/20/2014 10:37 PM
Krispy71

User ID: 962920
Netherlands
07/04/2010 01:25 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Are we famous or what, lol.
[link to forum.prisonplanet.com] j/k
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 900755

moshpit
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 780295
United States
07/04/2010 01:27 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Some helium-3 leaks up through deep-sourced hotspot
volcanoes such as those of the Hawaiian islands

so if they have tapped a volcano of some sort, those hoses we see right on top of cap, sucking up something, could be gathering helium 3?
SR37
User ID: 1019703
United States
07/04/2010 01:28 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Russia just purchased the Mistral and is planning to purchase more. This transfer just happened a few weeks ago, I wonder when Russia took possession of the Mistral? They bought one fully loaded.



Where are you getting that information from?

According to the article below, as of July 2 they were still negotiating the sale.

[link to www.expatica.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 969583



They are negotiating Russia purchasing three more yet to be built. The Mistral took port in St Petersburg in 2009!

[link to www.armybase.us]

France’s Mistral helicopter carrier on Monday made a port call in St. Petersburg, a Russian Navy spokesman said. Russia is seeking to buy a Mistral-class amphibious assault ship, worth 400-500 million euros and the ship arrived in Russia’s second city to be shown off to military personnel and the public.

[link to english.ruvr.ru]

Russia’s ”Rosoboronexport” has gone into talks with the Defense Ministry into the fulfillment of a contract to purchase a French-made Mistral helicopter-carriers. Mistral’s General Director Anatly Isaikin says the contract provides for setting the technical parameters and holding talks before the purchase.
TheWatcher

User ID: 997697
United States
07/04/2010 01:29 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Are we famous or what, lol.
[link to forum.prisonplanet.com] j/k

moshpit
 Quoting: Krispy71


Lol, people everywhere are desperate to know the "why" this is being allowed to continue.
arosebyanyothername

User ID: 522638
United States
07/04/2010 01:32 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Hmmmm, why aren't we using this?

"Regarding the Gulf Oil Spill; MOP Environmental's patented product MOP Maximum Oil Pickup has the ability to capture and contain the Gulf Oil Spill at its source and all locations out to its furthest perimeter including the marshlands and beaches. Where the oil has landed on beaches or land it will separate and remove the oil from the soil, or sand on site quickly. MOP Environmental's oil-only pickup product is called MOP Maximum Oil Pickup. MOP floats, is all natural, it is safe to the environment including birds, animals, and aquatic life. It is rapidly deployed at over 150 mph using MOP Environmental's MOP-Cannon and removed using their MOP-Vac. MOP is applied above water or below water where it floats up and locks in oil, completely neutralizing all potential harmful effects of the spilled oil. It is the only known oil recovery method that will work under all weather conditions. The oil can be retrieved for re-use where the resulting profit is greater than the expense of cleanup."
 Quoting: SotoZen 1023520


[link to www.marketwired.com]


I read about that a month or so ago. The only conclusion anyone can ascertain is that THEY do NOT want to clean it up.

Can anyone deny this?

Last Edited by Mister Obvious on 01/20/2014 10:38 PM
dhlos
User ID: 1024213
Greece
07/04/2010 01:35 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
He4 fission = 2x H2
H2 fusion = He4 (hydrogen bomb)

He3 fission = H2 + H-
valencies incomplete thus unstable Hydrogen atom

He3 is rare because it is unstable having 1 double and 1 single bond thus making it energy cost effective in fission
Doomamatrix

User ID: 994710
United States
07/04/2010 01:38 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
I read about that a month or so ago. The only conclusion anyone can ascertain is that THEY do NOT want to clean it up.

Can anyone deny this?
 Quoting: arosebyanyothername


Bingo.
Obamacare: Never has so much been taken away from so many for so few.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 1011531
France
07/04/2010 01:40 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
proceeding
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 1011531
France
07/04/2010 01:41 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Em captain reported hull demagnetizing issues getting irreversible (translation problem)
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1024213
Greece
07/04/2010 01:41 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Russia, Canada seek joint Arctic space monitoring project

[link to en.rian.ru]

Russia proposes setting up special fund for tackling oil spills — Medvedev

[link to en.rian.ru]
Chawlee

User ID: 1025073
United States
07/04/2010 01:43 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
hiding

Someone come get me when ya need some more jibber jabbin worthless filler.

I'm gonna go mingle with the other crazies.
Krispy71

User ID: 962920
Netherlands
07/04/2010 01:44 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Hmmmm, why aren't we using this?

"Regarding the Gulf Oil Spill; MOP Environmental's patented product MOP Maximum Oil Pickup has the ability to capture and contain the Gulf Oil Spill at its source and all locations out to its furthest perimeter including the marshlands and beaches. Where the oil has landed on beaches or land it will separate and remove the oil from the soil, or sand on site quickly. MOP Environmental's oil-only pickup product is called MOP Maximum Oil Pickup. MOP floats, is all natural, it is safe to the environment including birds, animals, and aquatic life. It is rapidly deployed at over 150 mph using MOP Environmental's MOP-Cannon and removed using their MOP-Vac. MOP is applied above water or below water where it floats up and locks in oil, completely neutralizing all potential harmful effects of the spilled oil. It is the only known oil recovery method that will work under all weather conditions. The oil can be retrieved for re-use where the resulting profit is greater than the expense of cleanup."

[link to www.marketwired.com]
 Quoting: SotoZen 1023520


My thought is, that they need to collect this SOUP in this manner UNDER WATER.
I read that when helium3 surfaces and goes up in the air it is not containable retrievable any more ....
Maybe this is not all about helium3, but also other substances ...
Thats why they dont want other noses around and helping them te collect it.: this is not ALL about OIL alone !!!! and not all about the algae ...
This is a multi layered thing going on !!!

Nobody would think or ever imagine the totallity of it all, that would be to absurd to consume and thus would not be believed and thus a perfect cover for what they are doing ...

Last Edited by Mister Obvious on 01/20/2014 10:37 PM
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 1011531
France
07/04/2010 01:44 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Em captain reported some crew feeling disorientated
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1024213
Greece
07/04/2010 01:45 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Russia, Canada seek joint Arctic space monitoring project

[link to en.rian.ru]

The satellite system will monitor climatic changes and survey energy resources in the Arctic region. It will monitor the weather and environment of the North Pole, pinpoint hydrocarbon deposits on the Arctic shelf, provide telecommunications over the hard-to-access areas and ensure safe air traffic and commercial shipping in the region.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1024213
Greece
07/04/2010 01:46 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Em captain reported hull demagnetizing issues getting irreversible (translation problem)
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1011531

manganese nodules
Krispy71

User ID: 962920
Netherlands
07/04/2010 01:47 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Something Just Went BEZERK in the Gulf of Mexico. The US Navy just sunk a French Submarine
Some helium-3 leaks up through deep-sourced hotspot
volcanoes such as those of the Hawaiian islands

so if they have tapped a volcano of some sort, those hoses we see right on top of cap, sucking up something, could be gathering helium 3?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 780295


yup maybe ... or some other important substances.
They have to keep it UNDER WATER thats why they use that chemical compound to keep it below the surface away from the air ... thats why they burn off crude oil on the surface coz it is no use to them (ever wondered why they burn it instead of collecting it ????

News