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Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1056301
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08/04/2010 12:22 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Depends on how much land you have, and how much you are willing to farm.
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 12:23 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Figuring out how to buy things in bulk, at or near wholesale would help a lot.

I bet if we could find a Ramen warehouse, they would gladly sell bulk Ramen without flavor packets for less than we get it in the store.

I have always been a little leery about approaching manufacturers in the area, not wanting to bother them with my own small purchase request, but I bet it would work.
Anonymous Coward
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08/04/2010 12:41 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Soup can be made in many different forms, and it can be made over and over. You just have to have the right ingredients, to start, and some of the left over soup can be made into casseroles. Bullion cubes or grains help with the flavor, and spices. You can make fried bread to eat with it, that is just self rising flour and water, made thin enough to pour in a oiled pan small amounts at a time. They look some what like a pancakes, you brown them on both sides.

Dry beans can also be very cheap you can make good soup with them or eat as they are when cooked. You can and rice, tomatoes and garlic, onions to most beans. Pinto beans are the best they taste better, after you reheat them the next day and the next.
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 12:51 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Depends on how much land you have, and how much you are willing to farm.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1056301


Well if you have good land and time, then you should be able to eat for nearly nothing, a few pennies a day (for seed cost) or less if you have saved and collected your own seeds.

Everyone that can should at least strive for a big garden. It reminds us that we are part of the Earth, not just here to use it.
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 02:26 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Soup can be made in many different forms, and it can be made over and over. You just have to have the right ingredients, to start, and some of the left over soup can be made into casseroles. Bullion cubes or grains help with the flavor, and spices. You can make fried bread to eat with it, that is just self rising flour and water, made thin enough to pour in a oiled pan small amounts at a time. They look some what like a pancakes, you brown them on both sides.

Dry beans can also be very cheap you can make good soup with them or eat as they are when cooked. You can and rice, tomatoes and garlic, onions to most beans. Pinto beans are the best they taste better, after you reheat them the next day and the next.
 Quoting: daughter


Soup sounds good, but the rules say that I have to keep to a certain calorie count as well. (At least 2,000 Calories per day.) I can't figure out how soup would fit in... Perhaps one based on rice?

Rice, water, spices, possibly corn starve to thicken?
Anonymous Coward
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08/04/2010 03:05 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Oatmeal is cheap if you buy it in bulk. Throw in some inexpensive fruit and have a hard boiled egg on the side, and you have a cheap meal.

I'm not sure what is the cheapest fruit in the states, but here it is bananas. I can buy a big bunch of bananas for fifty cents. Enough eggs to have one everyday for a month would cost me $3. The oatmeal would be pennies.
Anonymous Coward
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08/04/2010 03:37 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
If you want cheap meat, try liver. At our fast food chicken joints they sell breaded chicken livers. I can get 4 for 25 cents. Sometimes I buy them for my cat as well. He loves them, and it is cheaper than cat food. It's even less expensive if I buy them at the supermarket and cook them myself.

Cheap protein = Liver, eggs, dried beans, and milk.

I think that is the only protein you can afford if you want to try to get by on $15 a month.

Rice and oatmeal are your cheap grains. Noodles would work into your budget as well but I doubt you would be able to afford sauces and seasonings to go with them. So you could afford spaghetti but not spaghetti sauce.

I don't know what fruits and vegetables are cheap in the USA. Here it is bananas, papayas, potatoes, onions, and peppers that are cheap. I could easily buy a month's worth of the above produce for $5.

For cheap fats, the only things I can think of are vegetable oil and margarine. There are others that are cheap as well, like peanut butter, but it's not cheap enough to make your budget.
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 02:29 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
If you want cheap meat, try liver. At our fast food chicken joints they sell breaded chicken livers. I can get 4 for 25 cents. Sometimes I buy them for my cat as well. He loves them, and it is cheaper than cat food. It's even less expensive if I buy them at the supermarket and cook them myself.

Cheap protein = Liver, eggs, dried beans, and milk.

I think that is the only protein you can afford if you want to try to get by on $15 a month.

Rice and oatmeal are your cheap grains. Noodles would work into your budget as well but I doubt you would be able to afford sauces and seasonings to go with them. So you could afford spaghetti but not spaghetti sauce.

I don't know what fruits and vegetables are cheap in the USA. Here it is bananas, papayas, potatoes, onions, and peppers that are cheap. I could easily buy a month's worth of the above produce for $5.

For cheap fats, the only things I can think of are vegetable oil and margarine. There are others that are cheap as well, like peanut butter, but it's not cheap enough to make your budget.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1034655


I think that some food prices are higher here than there. There are no fruits or vegetables (that I have found so far) that you can buy from a store that will work in. (Thank goodness for the garden!)

Eggs are too pricey for common use, if I am to get enough calories per day. (And I have egg laying chickens. Even the price of their keep makes the unit price of eggs to expensive, though less so if they were truly free range birds, but so far they are not.

That is for common use with the needed caloric level, by the way, otherwise they run about five cents per egg. (Which has about 70 calories or so.)

You are right about the peanut butter!

I have managed some bean/grain combining for protein. So far so good on that. (of course you get a long while before lack of protein harms you overly, if you are an adult already.

My biggest worry is vitamin C. Still some of the garden fruit should help with that a little. Tomato's have some for instance.

* It is FAR cheaper for me to make the noodles myself than buy them ready made.

**I too am at a loss as to sauce, but perhaps something herb based? Oil and Rosemary lets say? Or Basil?

I will have to try and figure that one out!

Thank you for your suggestions and input, I would like to here more about what the food prices are there for comparison, if you get the time?

Last Edited by ................. on 08/04/2010 06:34 PM
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 04:33 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Just because I may try this in a couple days, has anyone here ever tried an oil and vinegar sauce for noodles? I can add spices if I am careful, and it will be cheap enough. (Vinegar is cheap, but has no discernible calories.)

If so, how did it taste? OK? Bad? (I pretty much will have to eat it, even if it bombs, so research before hand seems like a good idea!)

Thanks for the info.
Anonymous Coward
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08/04/2010 04:40 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
If you want cheap meat, try liver. At our fast food chicken joints they sell breaded chicken livers. I can get 4 for 25 cents. Sometimes I buy them for my cat as well. He loves them, and it is cheaper than cat food. It's even less expensive if I buy them at the supermarket and cook them myself.

Cheap protein = Liver, eggs, dried beans, and milk.

I think that is the only protein you can afford if you want to try to get by on $15 a month.

Rice and oatmeal are your cheap grains. Noodles would work into your budget as well but I doubt you would be able to afford sauces and seasonings to go with them. So you could afford spaghetti but not spaghetti sauce.

I don't know what fruits and vegetables are cheap in the USA. Here it is bananas, papayas, potatoes, onions, and peppers that are cheap. I could easily buy a month's worth of the above produce for $5.

For cheap fats, the only things I can think of are vegetable oil and margarine. There are others that are cheap as well, like peanut butter, but it's not cheap enough to make your budget.
-------------------------------------

I think that some food prices are higher here than there. There are no fruits or vegetables (that I have found so far) that you can buy from a store that will work in. (Thank goodness for the garden!)

Eggs are too pricey for common use, if I am to get enough calories per day. (And I have egg laying chickens. Even the price of their keep makes the unit price of eggs to expensive, though less so if they were truly free range birds, but so far they are not.

That is for common use with the needed caloric level, by the way, otherwise they run about five cents per egg. (Which has about 70 calories or so.)

You are right about the peanut butter!

I have managed some bean/grain combining for protein. So far so good on that. (of course you get a long while before lack of protein harms you overly, if you are an adult already.

My biggest worry is vitamin C. Still some of the garden fruit should help with that a little. Tomato's have some for instance.

* It is FAR cheaper for me to make the noodles myself than buy them ready made.

**I too am at a lose as to sauce, but perhaps something herb based? Oil and Rosemary lets say? Or Basil?

I will have to try and figure that one out!

Thank you for your suggestions and input, I would like to here more about what the food prices are there for comparison, if you get the time?
 Quoting: Pax


As for food prices here, some things are more expensive than they are in the USA, particularly US brands, because they are imports. Locally produced food is much, much cheaper, especially if you know where to buy it.

For the cheapest produce here, don't go to a grocery store, buy it from a street vendor. Every morning a guy with a truck full of produce shows up and announces his presence with a bull horn. I buy 5 pounds bags of fruit and vegetables from him for $1 each.

Sugar is also very cheap on the street, and it is raw turbinado sugar, much better than overly refined white sugar. I can buy a year's supply for $1.

Milk is about the same price here as in the USA, $4 a gallon. 2 sticks of margarine is $1

Pasta is cheaper than Raman noodles here, 200 grams (about 7 oz) for 33 cents. A 100 gram bag of Top Raman costs 25 cents. A box of the cheapest no name brand macaroni and cheese here is a budget breaker at 65 cents.

Rice is cheap bought in bulk, $9 for 20 pounds.
Oatmeal and dried beans are around the same price as rice.

Eggs, chicken, and chicken livers are cheap too. It seems there are more chickens than people in this country. A dozen eggs is less than a dollar. A big bag of chicken or chicken livers is dirt cheap too. Strangely enough, though chicken liver is cheap, beef liver will cost you as much as a good steak.

If you want to eat cheap here, you buy fresh fruit and vegetables, rice, dried beans, oatmeal, noodles, sugar, margarine, vegetable oil, eggs, chicken, and chicken livers.

Flour is also very cheap to bread your chicken and chicken livers. Hot dogs made of chicken cost $1 a dozen, but bread is expensive at $1.80 a loaf, so you have to eat your hot dogs without bread to stay in the budget.

2 lbs. of grape jelly costs me $2, and a 2 lb. 8 oz. jar of peanut butter costs me $5. It is cheaper to buy crackers than bread for the peanut butter and jelly. A bag of local brand saltine style crackers is 25 cents.

Another idea for a cheap noodle sauce is to saute onions in margarine then add it to cooked pasta. It's even better if you add sour cream as well, but that would break your budget.
Anonymous Coward
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08/04/2010 04:52 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
2000 calories is too many, you should be able to get by on 1200-1500 (admit it, you're probably overweight anyway).

I'm thinking lots of rice & beans. And don't ignore restaurant dumpsters...

5a
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 04:59 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Margarine is too expensive for me, but I could sauté onions (from the garden) in oil!

Thanks, that is dinner one of these evenings!

Bread is simple to make, so are crackers and tortillas. As long as you have flour. I can even manage hotdog buns... But I personally don't eat meat.

I think some of your prices are higher than they are here! (Which surprises me a little, I just figured we were at the top of the world for being overcharged on food! This kind of thing is why it is so important to be able to talk to people in other countries like this. I learned something new today.)

Ramen seems a little less expensive here. (.15 cents for an 85 gram package)

I will check out the pre-made pastas tomorrow when I go to town. Generally though, making the food from scratch seems significantly cheaper so far.

The local produce sounds better there! Where I live everything is Wheat. At that you can't just buy it from a road side vendor either. Other places do have such things and farmers markets though.

I wonder how the prices are in other countries for these things?

Thank you for sharing this information!
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 05:06 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
2000 calories is too many, you should be able to get by on 1200-1500 (admit it, you're probably overweight anyway).

I'm thinking lots of rice & beans. And don't ignore restaurant dumpsters...

5a
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 373696


I didn't mention it, but I am also keeping up a full work load, running and other exercise each day.

Yes, it is only running five miles a day and about forty minutes of other exercise, but it does add up.

Ideally I would not actually be losing weight during this time, even though, as you surmised, I can stand to lose a few pounds without harm to my system.

But dropping too low in calories just turns it into a starvation plan. Everyone can do that. This is about learning how to survive on less money, not proving I am tough enough to starve myself.

As it is though, I am losing about a pound per day so far. (Though I suspect this will stabilize.)

I'm never overly hungry though.

I live a LOOONG way from any dumpsters though (Forty or fifty miles). And beans are slightly high cost, though I am adding some in for both variety and protein.
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 05:11 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Just because I may try this in a couple days, has anyone here ever tried an oil and vinegar sauce for noodles? I can add spices if I am careful, and it will be cheap enough. (Vinegar is cheap, but has no discernible calories.)

If so, how did it taste? OK? Bad? (I pretty much will have to eat it, even if it bombs, so research before hand seems like a good idea!)

Thanks for the info.

I used a little olive oil mixed with balsamic vinegar (the
cheap version) and really liked it on the Raman noodles.
 Quoting: DrPostman


My balsamic vinegar turned into alcohol. Kind of ruined now. It's what I get for trying to tough things out and help the environment! :)

I haven't had the air conditioning on, and the indoor temperatures have been up around 85-92 this week.

Of course if I was thinking I would have stored it in the lower cupboards, which stays comparatively cool. (About 65-70 during the heat of the day.)

Still, I will try that your suggestion a little later in the month, though I may have to use a different type of vinegar. I think I have a lot of white and Apple cider left, that is still good.

*Sure, I could buy more and use the break down price per day, but it feels slightly dishonest for some reason.
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 06:36 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Anyone with tips for living without refrigeration for food? I am wondering if some kind of evaporative cooler would work.

Anyone with experience in building one?
Anonymous Coward
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08/04/2010 06:42 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Dress nice and hang out in funeral homes
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 06:50 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Dress nice and hang out in funeral homes
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 728329


:)

Or weddings. "Old friend of the bride you know... We really shouldn't go into it... You understand."
Anonymous Coward
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08/04/2010 06:55 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
This is BS. There is no way to survive on .50 per day unless you jackasses are eating Ramen noodles everyday. I won't eat that crap again. That is for college punks, I'm old and I need a damn steak like god intended.

Then go out and kill a deer like god intended.
I do, they taste great. And do it for less than 50 cents per day.

You must use cheap bullets and be an expert marksman.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1053404

Dude, he's not eating a deer a day.
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 07:50 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
This is BS. There is no way to survive on .50 per day unless you jackasses are eating Ramen noodles everyday. I won't eat that crap again. That is for college punks, I'm old and I need a damn steak like god intended.

Then go out and kill a deer like god intended.
I do, they taste great. And do it for less than 50 cents per day.

You must use cheap bullets and be an expert marksman.

Dude, he's not eating a deer a day.
 Quoting: Steven Quayle


:) Of course not.

I was working out the dynamics of trying to feed people via hunting last night. It works well enough for small numbers, and for a while we could sustain about half the population that way, as long as hunting was not to intensive and people figured out how to preserve the meat near the beginning of whatever down turn or catastrophe comes about.

But the fact remains that most people cannot live off of hunting and those that have the current skills will find it much harder when the amount of animals drops significantly. (Due to over hunting.)

In most primitive cultures, hunting is used only to supplement a mainly vegetable based diet, so a combination of such things may work well.

But if, like in this project, you are required to mainly shop from a store, then eating meat doesn't work well, not within this kind of budget.
Anonymous Coward
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08/04/2010 08:01 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Catfish in a barrel, and more...
[link to www.freewebs.com]
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 08:07 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
My balsamic vinegar turned into alcohol. Kind of ruined now. It's what I get for trying to tough things out and help the environment! :)

I didn't know it could even do that. I thought it was the
other way around and you have wine turning into vinegar and
losing it's alcohol content. I don't know much about vinegar
(other than I love balsamic and even got to try the real
expensive stuff once) but I did take some aged stuff out of
a cupboard where it's gotten hot quite a few times already
since put it there. Aged, but not terribly expensive and
it will be a few more weeks before I open it. I hope it's
not ruined. I'll be pissed.
 Quoting: DrPostman


I'm probably off about the chemical process, but it smelled like alcohol to me! :)

It was all the vinegar on the counter (a rather nice array of bottles really) so it has to be something going on here. Could be the time travel experiments, but those are kept well away from the kitchen.
Pax (OP)

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08/04/2010 11:09 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
So, I looked up how to build a evaporative cooler.

Plus side, easy to construct and simple to do in a makeshift (read emergency) fashion.

The down side is that you really only lower the temperature inside by about 15 degrees.

Digging a deep hole and putting insulation over it should keep things cooler than that in the summer most places.

I may grab some straw bales and see about building a small keeping pit-house.

Dig a pit, probably seven to eight foot deep, line the walls with straw bales, build a support of the roof and cover with more straw bales?

Really the walls wouldn't even have to be done, if it is deep enough.

Of course I would have to figure out an easy access entry point that could be closed tightly and insulated...
Pax (OP)

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08/05/2010 01:29 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Catfish in a barrel, and more...
[link to www.freewebs.com]
 Quoting: Steven Quayle


Interesting site. I will read more later. Thanks for posting it!
Anonymous Coward
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08/05/2010 01:30 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
And those "flavor packs" are loaded with MSG. Not good stuff.

I never use those anyway. Too bad you can't just buy plain
Raman and save some money by not including those packs.
 Quoting: DrPostman


Check out a local Asian grocery store, they sell a variety of thin noodles.
Anonymous Coward
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08/05/2010 01:53 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Dumpster diving.

I used to have a job at a local zoo in the summer (college daze) and we would get a weekly truck load of meat and food stuffs from the local supermarket.

Some we could use, the rest was trash.

There was all sorts of canned and prepared foods, pastas, breads etc that went in the trash because of the best before date.

So they gave this stuff to the zoo, and the meat, eggs and fruit and veggies were welcome, but the rest could have gone to a homeless shelter and they would have had good food.

I notice that supermarkets padlock their bins.

Why?

So poor and desperate people won't get the food for free.
Anonymous Coward
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08/05/2010 03:15 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
I don't think I could eat on $.50 a day. My cats' food is about $.50 a day EACH!
I could do $.50 for breakfast and lunch, but not for dinner, since I eat chicken and turkey.

Have you considered pesto? It's a herb & oil mixture you put on pasta. Many Pesto recipes have parmesan cheese. I leave the cheese out and it tastes very good.

Tomato Bruschetta is something else you might like to try, since you have fresh tomatoes. Bruschetta can be eaten on bread or pasta noodles.
It is something like salsa.

[link to www.food.com]


Good luck with your experiment OP. I would lose weight eating what you are everyday.
Pax (OP)

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08/05/2010 03:25 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Dumpster diving.

I used to have a job at a local zoo in the summer (college daze) and we would get a weekly truck load of meat and food stuffs from the local supermarket.

Some we could use, the rest was trash.

There was all sorts of canned and prepared foods, pastas, breads etc that went in the trash because of the best before date.

So they gave this stuff to the zoo, and the meat, eggs and fruit and veggies were welcome, but the rest could have gone to a homeless shelter and they would have had good food.

I notice that supermarkets padlock their bins.

Why?

So poor and desperate people won't get the food for free.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1058537


I never saw the logic in that. I suppose it is to "protect" the store from law suits, so that if someone gets sick they will not be held responsible...

But as long as full disclosure is made (that this is expired food) then people should be able to eat at their own risk, right?

Why throw away good food tht people are willing to eat, just because you cannot make money off of it?

Anyone willing to eat out of a dumpster is probably not going to buy retail from their store.
Pax (OP)

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08/05/2010 05:40 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
I don't think I could eat on $.50 a day. My cats' food is about $.50 a day EACH!
I could do $.50 for breakfast and lunch, but not for dinner, since I eat chicken and turkey.

Have you considered pesto? It's a herb & oil mixture you put on pasta. Many Pesto recipes have parmesan cheese. I leave the cheese out and it tastes very good.

Tomato Bruschetta is something else you might like to try, since you have fresh tomatoes. Bruschetta can be eaten on bread or pasta noodles.
It is something like salsa.

[link to www.food.com]


Good luck with your experiment OP. I would lose weight eating what you are everyday.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1026659


I think I will give something like a pesto a try soon!

Thanks for the idea.
Pax (OP)

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08/05/2010 09:34 PM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Has anyone noticed grain prices slowly creeping up lately?

I went to the store today and the cheapest grain (Course ground corn meal) was .05 cents per pound more!

That is a huge jump for such a short time. (Two weeks)

I haven't heard of any massive droughts or anything like that, did I miss something?

Has Corexit hit the corn belt or something?
Anonymous Coward
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08/06/2010 01:13 AM
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Re: Economics of Eating: No Hunger on 50 cents per day!
Has anyone here ever made dried peas? It seems to be taking forever!

:)

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