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Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag

 
yep...itsme
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08/29/2010 11:41 PM
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Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
I have decided to create a series of small how-to's that you can build upon for survival/disaster preparations. It is not an end-all-be-all list of the Gods, and its not intended to be a definitive treatise of THE best information available. I am simply informing you of my findings, and my experience. Your mileage may vary, and please; lets keep this thread clean or I will cease to post.

ALL of my vehicles (4) have either GHB (Get Home Bag) and/or a Three Day Kit. I also keep footware, socks and a weather specific change of clothing in my vehicles as well.

Easy to talk the talk, but if you are leaving the office and TSHTF, how are you going to do in a suit and hard sole shoes? Women, hike much in pumps and a skirt?

The basics are the 4dubs:
1) What are you attempting to do - get home, get away or shelter in place? Do you have a scenario plan?

2) What is your level of physical training, and how fit are you? Do you have a training plan?

3) What is your level of training with your gear? Have you used it? Have you used it in ALL weather and environments?
Can you locate gear within the bag in the pitch black? Can you make a shelter in the dark? Do you have a practice schedule?

4) What are you committed to do? Are you willing to take your three day bag and habe a friend drop you someplace and see if it (and you!) perform as intended?


One of the first things people do when the embrace prepping is assemble a bug out bag (BoB). This is intended to be a bag with supplies to enable the user to get through a tough time or travel some distance to a safer location. These bags end up with all sorts of names (Get Out Of Dodge, Get Home Bag, etc) but the mission is generally the same: Contain the supplies you'll need in an easily transportable container.

Here are some things to consider when starting your first BoB. These are not exhaustive or The Gospel but are intended to be some food for thought.

1) Buy Quality: $20 bags from Cheaper Than Dirt are a waste of time. Someone will pipe up and say "I have one packed with 1,000lbs and it works great". Well, they are the lucky ones. Do you really want to trust your life and that of your families to the cheapest bag possible? Not saying you have to spend $5,000 but just going for cheap typically results in zippers that fall apart, buckles that crack, straps that fray and seems that rip out. If you are on a shoestring budget go to an army surplus store and pick up an old Alice pack. They aren't sexy but at least they are stout.

2) Your bag should be comfortable: Putting a 80lbs bag on your back and walking 50 miles isn't a real picnic. Having a bag that chafes, rubs and pokes you every step of the way isn't going to make it any easier. The bigger the bag the more padding and width the straps should have and the more important things like kidney pads, waist belts, chest straps, suspension systems, etc become.

3) Consider the mission: What is the bag for? Is it to grab in the event you have to evacuate the house due to a chemical spill or to travel overland for a year? Those are two different goals and as such the contents of your bag will differ accordingly. Consider what you want to accomplish with your bag and this will help you to determine what you put in your bag.

Also, don't forget that a BoB doesn't necessary have to be for playing Mad Max in the woods. Lets say you are in a wheelchair and there's no way in hell you are going overland. You may, however, have a plan to drive across town to your parents more rural home and set up camp there. Wouldn't it be nice to have some spare wheelchair parts handy? Put those in your bag. You can almost eliminate food and water from the bag (or at least only have some emergency rations) but then increase the amount of gear you pack to make life more comfortable at your parents house. The point is a BOB isn't always about hiking 400 miles in Omega Man style.

3) Don't Pack the Kitchen Sink: The number one mistake people make with BOB's is to stuff it full of 127lbs of equipment, most of which isn't needed. Put together a list of everything you'll need for your intended mission. Then start going through it with the mantra of "weight kills". Start eliminating items. Start looking for items that can serve a dual purpose. Start looking for gadgets that will do 10 different things. Look for any way to eliminate items and reduce weight.

Example: Do you really need a 4 burner Coleman stove when an esbit stove with Trioxane tabs will do? Do you really need a full blown propane torch when one of those pencil jobs will do? You get the idea.

Point is, you want to get that pack as light as humanly and reasonably possible.

4) Organize: Remember, the time you actually use the pack will, by definition, be stressful. The LAST thing you need is to be digging around in a gigantic bottomless pit of gear. Classic example is an epi pen. If you need it to deal with an allergic reaction do you really want it lost in a pit of stuff while your daughters windpipe swells shut? (Hold on sweetie...I know it's in here somewhere!)

Put a lot of thought into what items you'll need to access frequently or quickly and have them easily accessible. Things like first-aid, emergency food, compass, radios, basic tools should likely be in outer/easy reach pockets.

Also, consider this maxim: detachable pouches have a tendency to detach. So don't put anything in a detachable pouch that you can't afford to have detached and lost. Also, secure those pouches so you aren't wasting time fiddling with semi-detached pouches when you should be making tracks. 550 or para cord is a personal favorite for this.

5) Test the pack out: Put the thing on. Walk around, do some jumping jacks, bend over, squat down and try to stand up. See what it feels like or if it's unbalanced. More desired is to actually go camping with the thing and wear it for three straight days to see how it really feels and performs. Modify what doesn't work. If you can't go camping, put it on and wear it around the house a couple of days while you do your normal chores.

Looking good sitting on the shelf doesn't mean squat compared to actually working on your back.

6) It's a work in progress: Know that once you complete your pack that it will likely morph over time. It's not uncommon for BOB's to be rebuilt 5 and 6 different times as needs change and/or wisdom is gained. In fact, the worst thing you can do is build a BOB, toss it in a dark place, let it sit for 10 years and then expect it to perform when needed. You should be checking on the contents every so often to make sure batteries haven't busted or the like. But more importantly, keep modifying the contents and their locations to suit your needs.

So there you go. Like I said, this isn't the exhaustive list of what to do, but it should be enough to get you started.

If you want a list of items to put in your bag let me know.

If you are a certified GearWhore, like I am, you'll quickly realize that while the use of a BoB is deadly serious, building BoB's can be a lot of fun. Don't stress out over details. Use common sense. Build a bag that makes sense to you and your objectives. Don't get hyper-focused on playing GI Joe in the woods for 10 years.

Closing thought: There seems to be a lot of debate about what type of bag to get. Some say avoid military looking bags because you'll draw attention to yourself. You can get a plain old camping style bag and "blend in".

My opinion (because I know you are sitting on pins and needles waiting for it)....don't get caught up in minutia. If you dashing out the house because of a chemical spill nobody cares what their bag looks like. If things have gotten so bad that you and the family are walking 200 miles to a Super-Secret Bat Cave what sort of pack you have is the least of your worries (not to mention, if things have gotten that bad people are going to attack you no matter what. They aren't going to turn away because you have a NorthFace bag instead of a Maxpedition).

I'd rather you spend your mental energy on determining what goes in the bag, or the location of the content so the bag can help save your life than loosing sleep over a minor detail like what the bag looks like.


More later...
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1083254
Canada
08/29/2010 11:43 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
How about a bug out RV?

Take everything and the kitchen sink.
Anonymous Coward
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08/29/2010 11:48 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
My bug out bag is loaded with weed.

What else do you need when the world is going to fucking end??

I'll have all your ladies with me too...as we smoke away the pain.

pimp
Anonymous Coward
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08/29/2010 11:49 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
bump
Anonymous Coward
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08/29/2010 11:52 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Thread: Is having a nice stash of Marijuana in your 'preps' a good idea for when TSHTF?
Anonymous Coward
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08/30/2010 12:22 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Every vehicle I own has an AR-15, 4 30-round mags, a quart of KY lube and 2 playboys from 1988. My wife thinks I'm crazy but she'll get it in the end.
Anonymous Coward
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08/30/2010 12:32 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Have you forgotten about the 5 dancing Israeli Mossad agents who were celebrating the hits on the towers?

Then who saw to it that they were quickly spirited out of the country and never charged?

There you go.
Anonymous Coward
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08/30/2010 01:42 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Every vehicle I own has an AR-15, 4 30-round mags, a quart of KY lube and 2 playboys from 1988. My wife thinks I'm crazy but she'll get it in the end.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1047745



lol ky and get it in the end
yep...itsme (OP)

User ID: 912389
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08/30/2010 09:41 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
bump

For the morning crowd...
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
yep...itsme (OP)

User ID: 912389
United States
08/30/2010 07:20 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
bump
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
Anonymous Coward
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United States
08/30/2010 07:24 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Every vehicle I own has an AR-15, 4 30-round mags, a quart of KY lube and 2 playboys from 1988. My wife thinks I'm crazy but she'll get it in the end.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1047745


I wanna be in your wife's bunker.
Anonymous Coward
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08/30/2010 07:25 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Thanks for your efforts OP. I agree with most you wrote.

What does part deux cover?
Anonymous Coward
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08/30/2010 07:29 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
thanks for sharing, op ..

check out YouTuber "YankeePrepper" .. he does a great job with this stuff
Anonymous Coward
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08/30/2010 07:36 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Have you forgotten about the 5 dancing Israeli Mossad agents who were celebrating the hits on the towers?

Then who saw to it that they were quickly spirited out of the country and never charged?

There you go.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1083254

[link to whatreallyhappened.com] check this out.
Anonymous Coward
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08/30/2010 07:38 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
I have decided to create a series of small how-to's that you can build upon for survival/disaster preparations. It is not an end-all-be-all list of the Gods, and its not intended to be a definitive treatise of THE best information available. I am simply informing you of my findings, and my experience. Your mileage may vary, and please; lets keep this thread clean or I will cease to post.

ALL of my vehicles (4) have either GHB (Get Home Bag) and/or a Three Day Kit. I also keep footware, socks and a weather specific change of clothing in my vehicles as well.

Easy to talk the talk, but if you are leaving the office and TSHTF, how are you going to do in a suit and hard sole shoes? Women, hike much in pumps and a skirt?

The basics are the 4dubs:
1) What are you attempting to do - get home, get away or shelter in place? Do you have a scenario plan?

2) What is your level of physical training, and how fit are you? Do you have a training plan?

3) What is your level of training with your gear? Have you used it? Have you used it in ALL weather and environments?
Can you locate gear within the bag in the pitch black? Can you make a shelter in the dark? Do you have a practice schedule?

4) What are you committed to do? Are you willing to take your three day bag and habe a friend drop you someplace and see if it (and you!) perform as intended?


One of the first things people do when the embrace prepping is assemble a bug out bag (BoB). This is intended to be a bag with supplies to enable the user to get through a tough time or travel some distance to a safer location. These bags end up with all sorts of names (Get Out Of Dodge, Get Home Bag, etc) but the mission is generally the same: Contain the supplies you'll need in an easily transportable container.

Here are some things to consider when starting your first BoB. These are not exhaustive or The Gospel but are intended to be some food for thought.

1) Buy Quality: $20 bags from Cheaper Than Dirt are a waste of time. Someone will pipe up and say "I have one packed with 1,000lbs and it works great". Well, they are the lucky ones. Do you really want to trust your life and that of your families to the cheapest bag possible? Not saying you have to spend $5,000 but just going for cheap typically results in zippers that fall apart, buckles that crack, straps that fray and seems that rip out. If you are on a shoestring budget go to an army surplus store and pick up an old Alice pack. They aren't sexy but at least they are stout.

2) Your bag should be comfortable: Putting a 80lbs bag on your back and walking 50 miles isn't a real picnic. Having a bag that chafes, rubs and pokes you every step of the way isn't going to make it any easier. The bigger the bag the more padding and width the straps should have and the more important things like kidney pads, waist belts, chest straps, suspension systems, etc become.

3) Consider the mission: What is the bag for? Is it to grab in the event you have to evacuate the house due to a chemical spill or to travel overland for a year? Those are two different goals and as such the contents of your bag will differ accordingly. Consider what you want to accomplish with your bag and this will help you to determine what you put in your bag.

Also, don't forget that a BoB doesn't necessary have to be for playing Mad Max in the woods. Lets say you are in a wheelchair and there's no way in hell you are going overland. You may, however, have a plan to drive across town to your parents more rural home and set up camp there. Wouldn't it be nice to have some spare wheelchair parts handy? Put those in your bag. You can almost eliminate food and water from the bag (or at least only have some emergency rations) but then increase the amount of gear you pack to make life more comfortable at your parents house. The point is a BOB isn't always about hiking 400 miles in Omega Man style.

3) Don't Pack the Kitchen Sink: The number one mistake people make with BOB's is to stuff it full of 127lbs of equipment, most of which isn't needed. Put together a list of everything you'll need for your intended mission. Then start going through it with the mantra of "weight kills". Start eliminating items. Start looking for items that can serve a dual purpose. Start looking for gadgets that will do 10 different things. Look for any way to eliminate items and reduce weight.

Example: Do you really need a 4 burner Coleman stove when an esbit stove with Trioxane tabs will do? Do you really need a full blown propane torch when one of those pencil jobs will do? You get the idea.

Point is, you want to get that pack as light as humanly and reasonably possible.

4) Organize: Remember, the time you actually use the pack will, by definition, be stressful. The LAST thing you need is to be digging around in a gigantic bottomless pit of gear. Classic example is an epi pen. If you need it to deal with an allergic reaction do you really want it lost in a pit of stuff while your daughters windpipe swells shut? (Hold on sweetie...I know it's in here somewhere!)

Put a lot of thought into what items you'll need to access frequently or quickly and have them easily accessible. Things like first-aid, emergency food, compass, radios, basic tools should likely be in outer/easy reach pockets.

Also, consider this maxim: detachable pouches have a tendency to detach. So don't put anything in a detachable pouch that you can't afford to have detached and lost. Also, secure those pouches so you aren't wasting time fiddling with semi-detached pouches when you should be making tracks. 550 or para cord is a personal favorite for this.

5) Test the pack out: Put the thing on. Walk around, do some jumping jacks, bend over, squat down and try to stand up. See what it feels like or if it's unbalanced. More desired is to actually go camping with the thing and wear it for three straight days to see how it really feels and performs. Modify what doesn't work. If you can't go camping, put it on and wear it around the house a couple of days while you do your normal chores.

Looking good sitting on the shelf doesn't mean squat compared to actually working on your back.

6) It's a work in progress: Know that once you complete your pack that it will likely morph over time. It's not uncommon for BOB's to be rebuilt 5 and 6 different times as needs change and/or wisdom is gained. In fact, the worst thing you can do is build a BOB, toss it in a dark place, let it sit for 10 years and then expect it to perform when needed. You should be checking on the contents every so often to make sure batteries haven't busted or the like. But more importantly, keep modifying the contents and their locations to suit your needs.

So there you go. Like I said, this isn't the exhaustive list of what to do, but it should be enough to get you started.

If you want a list of items to put in your bag let me know.

If you are a certified GearWhore, like I am, you'll quickly realize that while the use of a BoB is deadly serious, building BoB's can be a lot of fun. Don't stress out over details. Use common sense. Build a bag that makes sense to you and your objectives. Don't get hyper-focused on playing GI Joe in the woods for 10 years.

Closing thought: There seems to be a lot of debate about what type of bag to get. Some say avoid military looking bags because you'll draw attention to yourself. You can get a plain old camping style bag and "blend in".

My opinion (because I know you are sitting on pins and needles waiting for it)....don't get caught up in minutia. If you dashing out the house because of a chemical spill nobody cares what their bag looks like. If things have gotten so bad that you and the family are walking 200 miles to a Super-Secret Bat Cave what sort of pack you have is the least of your worries (not to mention, if things have gotten that bad people are going to attack you no matter what. They aren't going to turn away because you have a NorthFace bag instead of a Maxpedition).

I'd rather you spend your mental energy on determining what goes in the bag, or the location of the content so the bag can help save your life than loosing sleep over a minor detail like what the bag looks like.


More later...
 Quoting: yep...itsme

Check it out [link to whatreallyhappened.com]
nongboo

User ID: 1082787
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08/30/2010 08:08 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
The best way to go is a army issue large rucksack, plenty big enough to hold all the necessities, and durable enough to last a long time. Additional pouches and attachments can be sewn to the outside of the ruck for items that will need to be within easy reach (first aid kit, canteens, field ax, shovel, binos, etc.), everything else is then packed inside in the order necessary (if used more often is packed closer to the top). And don't forget to use the waist strap so your hips will bear most of the weight as opposed to your shoulders, if you're carrying close to a hundred pounds that will make it alot easier if you're in good shape. If you are not in good condition you'll have to pick out what you need the least and carry less, cross load your gear if you're not moving alone. But like the OP stated, getting comfortable with your pack and gear is key, regardless of what you decide to carry. pennywise

Last Edited by nongboo on 08/30/2010 09:10 PM
VICTORY IS TO SURVIVE AND DEATH IS DEFEAT!
PrincessBride

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08/30/2010 08:13 PM

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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Thank you for posting this. My daughter sent me this in an e-mail this morning, so it's very timely.

"I wanted to tell you about a weird dream I had where I had to pack on backpack to be ready to go at any time. I knew something no one else around me knew and they thought i was crazy. That was the dream."

It runs in the family, what can I say.

I'm sending her a link to this thread.

Last Edited by PrincessBride on 08/30/2010 08:20 PM
Heart of the heroes, ride.
Up through an empty house of stars,
Being what heart you are,
Up the inhuman steeps of space
As on a staircase go in grace,
Carrying the firelight on your face
Beyond the loneliest star.
"The Ballad Of The White Horse,"
G. K. Chesterton
spam [link to lunarose47.wordpress.com] blog[/url]
spam [link to w11.haters]
nongboo

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08/30/2010 08:37 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
bump
VICTORY IS TO SURVIVE AND DEATH IS DEFEAT!
DoomGuy

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Australia
08/30/2010 09:32 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Good stuff OP

Looking forward to the rest of the series
yep...itsme (OP)

User ID: 912389
United States
08/30/2010 09:45 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Thanks! I truly am just attempting to share the years of info I have. I have a large number of doc to post, and plan on doing it as often as I can.


Here are links to the other post(s) in this series:
Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need? Thread: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Survival Preparation - #3 in a series: When SHTF Thread: Survival Preparation - #3 in a series: When SHTF

P. Bride:
I will help in anyway I can. Please let me know if you need application and area specific data and ideas.

edited to add links

Last Edited by yep...itsme on 08/30/2010 09:51 PM
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
PrincessBride

User ID: 1084609
United States
08/30/2010 10:03 PM

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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
"P. Bride:
I will help in anyway I can. Please let me know if you need application and area specific data and ideas."

Thank you. I'll find out what she is interested in. Also, she may decide to post directly.

As her mom, my first concern is winter preparedness in an area that gets extreme cold weather, especially in her car. She is in the upper Midwest where it can get to 30 below with high winds and storms can take travelers and commuters by surprise.

I know she does a lot of bicycling, hiking, camping, and kayaking in the summer.

Any suggestions are appreciated.
Heart of the heroes, ride.
Up through an empty house of stars,
Being what heart you are,
Up the inhuman steeps of space
As on a staircase go in grace,
Carrying the firelight on your face
Beyond the loneliest star.
"The Ballad Of The White Horse,"
G. K. Chesterton
spam [link to lunarose47.wordpress.com] blog[/url]
spam [link to w11.haters]
DoomGuy

User ID: 1084585
Australia
08/30/2010 10:11 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Thanks! I truly am just attempting to share the years of info I have. I have a large number of doc to post, and plan on doing it as often as I can.


Here are links to the other post(s) in this series:
Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need? Thread: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Survival Preparation - #3 in a series: When SHTF Thread: Survival Preparation - #3 in a series: When SHTF

P. Bride:
I will help in anyway I can. Please let me know if you need application and area specific data and ideas.

edited to add links
 Quoting: yep...itsme


ahhh sweet

Thanks :)
notabadsite
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08/30/2010 10:20 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Good thread timing. I've wanting to put together a BOB for a while now.
yep...itsme (OP)

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08/30/2010 10:30 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Good thread timing. I've wanting to put together a BOB for a while now.
 Quoting: notabadsite 1084095


Excelent! No time like the present...more lists coming!
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
yep...itsme (OP)

User ID: 912389
United States
08/30/2010 10:33 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
"P. Bride:
I will help in anyway I can. Please let me know if you need application and area specific data and ideas."

Thank you. I'll find out what she is interested in. Also, she may decide to post directly.

As her mom, my first concern is winter preparedness in an area that gets extreme cold weather, especially in her car. She is in the upper Midwest where it can get to 30 below with high winds and storms can take travelers and commuters by surprise.

I know she does a lot of bicycling, hiking, camping, and kayaking in the summer.

Any suggestions are appreciated.
 Quoting: PrincessBride



Your welcome! I do not have access to private mail through GLP, but I can reply if you send me a message which I will use for lists and info...contact me at your convenience!
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
Anonymous Coward
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United States
08/30/2010 10:41 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
My bug out bag is loaded with weed.

What else do you need when the world is going to fucking end??

I'll have all your ladies with me too...as we smoke away the pain.

pimp
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1082425



I'm bugging with you buddy!
yep...itsme (OP)

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United States
08/31/2010 10:38 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
The Bug Out Bag: Continued

With Military gear, you have a VAST array of options available to you. Early canvas M-1956 LCE gear was typically treated canvas, and had few attaching points. I started out with gear. A web belt, canteen and butt-pack, and a variety of pouches attached around the belt and a set of early issue "h" suspenders to balance the load. I had this set up through my teen years, and actually still have it in a tub, all set up to use in a pinch, or loan to another.

This type of gear is easily identifiable by a wire 'bale' that attaches to and through the eyelets of the web belt. Later incarnations became nylon and the bale was replaced by ALICE clips.

While good, this early system was bulky, not easily expandable and can be uncomfortable to wear, especially if you are trying to wear a pack over the suspenders.

Later in Vietnam, we saw the Military issue ALICE gear: All-Purpose Lightweight Individual Carrying Equipment

The Large or Medium ALICE Pack Bag is quite well designed and very strong. It has plenty of pockets and lots of places to hang equipment and allows easy access to your gear. The frame is well designed and built. It can easily carry in excess of 100 pound loads and should give several years of service.

The ALICE Pack is an excellent choice hunting and fishing, backpacking or as a survival pack, provided the proper modifications are performed.

The issue suspension system is the real weak point of the ALICE Pack. The shoulder straps are not properly contoured for comfort and stability. They have many sewn through areas which produce “hot spots” and discomfort on longer Ruck marches and runs and there is too much hardware which adds weight and is prone to failure.

The belt likewise has the same sewn through construction and produces the same “hot spots” and is nearly worthless. It does not allow the user to carry heavy loads on the hips with any great degree of comfort. A high quality hip belt is needed which allows the user to carry 60 - 80% or more of the Rucksack weight on the hips.

Many people mistakenly believe the weight of the pack should rest on the shoulders. This is wrong except when running or climbing. Carrying the full weight of the ruck on the shoulders only causes the vertebrae in the wearer's back to become compressed, leading to fatigue, backache or worse. Ideally, the shoulder straps and waist belt need the ability to quickly and easily adjust the weight of the rucksack between the wearers shoulders and waist for different activities such as long marches, running, climbing and other vigorous activities.

The web is full of pics and ideas for re-enforcing and modifying the medium and large ALICE packs. As they are easy to find (don’t get a cheap reproduction) at military surplus stores, online and at a local gun show, you might consider this option once you recognize its limitations.

Around 1997, the MOLLE system was introduced. MOLLE is an acronym for MOdular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment.

It is used to define the current generation of load-bearing equipment and rucksacks utilized by the United States armed forces, and its use is also growing in the British Army in the form of the Osprey Modular systems.

The system's modularity is derived from the use of PALS (Pouch Attachment Ladder System) webbing, which are basically multiple rows of heavy-duty nylon stitched onto a vest or pack which allows for attachment of various MOLLE-compatible pouches and accessories.

This method of attachment has become a de facto standard for modular tactical gear, replacing the click and stick system used in the ALICE systems.

It is produced for the United States Government under contract by several contractors, such as Specialty Defense, Armor Holdings as well as Eagle Industries. A very large number of companies make MOLLE equipment. Its easy to find, easy to create your best load-out configuration. I highly suggest you consider MOLLE equipment as that is what you will begin to see in military surplus stores as issue gear gets rotated out of use.

My brothers in the USMC are using a variation of this system called ILBE; Improved Load Bearing Equipment. Its is being phased out to a new and vastly improved ILBE system.
Aftermarket manufacturers are driving these MOLLE type products hard. Cobra, ProTech, Tactical Taylor (to only name a few) are leaders in this area.

If you are going to use military gear, I highly suggest purchasing a military field manual to learn as much as possible about the design, configuration issues and maintenance of your new (to you?) gear. Remember, for our purposes here, Information can mean the difference between life and death in a survival situation, and keeping your head clear in temporary chaos!

More later...
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
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My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
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Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1081732
France
08/31/2010 10:48 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Every vehicle I own has an AR-15, 4 30-round mags, a quart of KY lube and 2 playboys from 1988. My wife thinks I'm crazy but she'll get it in the end.


I wanna be in your wife's bunker.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1080876


You accept me?
..with 2 PlayBoy 1988
ifSHTF
have a plan when it hits the fan.

User ID: 1058936
United States
08/31/2010 10:52 AM

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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Every vehicle I own has an AR-15, 4 30-round mags, a quart of KY lube and 2 playboys from 1988. My wife thinks I'm crazy but she'll get it in the end.


I wanna be in your wife's bunker.


You accept me?
..with 2 PlayBoy 1988
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1081732

why 1988?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 926799
Canada
08/31/2010 10:59 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
Great Post OP!

Can we use it here?

[link to beyondprophecy.blogspot.com]
<<LOOK`n thru YOU>>

User ID: 922574
United States
08/31/2010 11:05 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag
It`s funny I was thinking about this the other day..I work 9 miles from my house..house is pretty much set less more food stock...but get`n home will be a doozy...I got my route planned now I need my items..wished I could have a gun but can`t have one in vehicle at work..automatic termination...knives are cool tho..the route should be chosen well also. Mine would be to stay in the wheat and feed fields all the way home along or in the tree lines..3 hours tops I could be home I do believe...and their lies my haven..fireplace, well, propane, generators, guns and ammo, a concrete tornado shelter/hidey hole...and several hand picked folks to meet me there...oh and my four chihuahuas

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