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Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?

 
yep...itsme
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08/30/2010 10:16 AM
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Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Responding in another thread, I have decided to create a series of small how-to's that you can build upon for survival/disaster preparations. It is not an end-all-be-all list of the Gods, and its not intended to be a definitive treatise of THE best information available. I am simply informing you of my findings, and my experience. Your mileage may vary, and please; lets keep this thread clean or I will cease to post.

Here are links to the other post(s) in this series:
Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag Thread: Survival Preparation - #1 in a series: The Bug out Bag

How Much Water do I Need?
You should have at least a three-day supply of water and you should store at least one gallon of water per person per day. Don't forget about the water for personal hygiene and pets!
A normally active person needs at least one-half gallon of water daily just for drinking. Stress situations such as a bug out you will need to adjust the amount you can carry, and how you pack it. If you are prepping for a GET HOME or a BUG OUT, you really cant pack a five-gallon bottle or easily carry a few two and a half gallon jugs. Approach the problem logically.
Is potable still available in your given situation? If not, is ANY water available? Carry a filtration system...AND a pre filter! Don't forget about something(s) to store and carry it!
Additionally, in determining adequate quantities, take the following into account:
•Individual needs vary, depending on age, physical condition, activity, diet, and climate.
•Children, nursing mothers, and ill people need more water.
•Very hot temperatures can double the amount of water needed.
•A medical emergency might require additional water.

How Should I Store Water?
To prepare safest and most reliable emergency supply of water, it is recommended you purchase commercially bottled water. Keep bottled water in its original container and do not open it until you need to use it. Try to keep it in a cool, dry and easily accessible place. In addition, cache water in a variety of locations. Personally I keep water in a large variety of location in, under and around my home and property.
Observe the expiration or “use by” date. Use a sharpie marker to indicate your purchase date.

If You are Preparing Your Own Containers of Water
It is recommended you purchase food-grade water storage containers from surplus or camping supplies stores to use for water storage. Before filling with water, thoroughly clean the containers with dish washing soap and water, and rinse completely so there is no residual soap. Follow directions below on filling the container with water.
If you choose to use your own storage containers, choose two-liter plastic soft drink bottles – DO NOT USE plastic jugs or cardboard containers that have had milk or fruit juice in them! Milk protein and fruit sugars cannot be adequately removed from these containers and provide an environment for bacterial growth when water is stored in them. Cardboard containers also leak easily and are not designed for long-term storage of liquids. Also, do not use glass containers, because they can break and are heavy.

If storing water in plastic soda bottles, follow these steps
Thoroughly clean the bottles with dish washing soap and water, and rinse completely so there is no residual soap. Sanitize the bottles by adding a solution of 1 teaspoon of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to a quart of water. Swish the sanitizing solution in the bottle so that it touches all surfaces. After sanitizing the bottle, thoroughly rinse out the sanitizing solution with clean water.

Filling Water Containers:
Fill the bottle to the top with regular tap water. If the tap water has been commercially treated from a water utility with chlorine, you do not need to add anything else to the water to keep it clean. If the water you are using comes from a well or water source that is not treated with chlorine, add two drops of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to the water. Tightly close the container using the original cap. Be careful not to contaminate the cap by touching the inside of it with your finger. Place a date on the outside of the container so that you know when you filled it. Store in a cool, dark place. Replace the water every six months if not using commercially bottled water.

Its worth saying again: If you are storing any preps in your home, split it up into different areas as much as you can. Someone I know stored everything in his garage and when an earthquake occurred in his area, he was unable to retrieve ANY of his stored items!

More later...
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
yep...itsme (OP)

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08/30/2010 01:21 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
bump
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
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My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
Tired
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08/30/2010 01:24 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Question...do you know why it should be clear plastic? They sell water in jugs that are same milky color as the ones that have milk in them too. What is the difference?
Anonymous Coward
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08/30/2010 01:28 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
[link to www.survivaloutdoorskills.com]

and when the supplies run out?

you have to filter and purify that stinking pool of water you find somehow. follow the instructions in that link.
yep...itsme (OP)

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08/30/2010 01:35 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Stored water may eventually develop a disagreeable appearance, taste, or odor. Inspect your water supply at least every three to six months (I inspect ours every three months, and replace it every six) to see whether the containers have leaks or if there is an appearance change. Its easier to see in clear.

From a strictly survival point of view, water is the most important element for your body's survival. A person can lose all reserve carbohydrate and fat, and about half the body's protein without being in real danger. A loss of only 10 percent to 22 percent body weight as water is fatal.

The amount of water lost from the body through urine, water vapor from the lungs, and through perspiration averages 2.5 liters per day. Water loss must be made up by fluids consumed, and by the water produced in the body as a result of metabolic processes.

The effects of dehydration on the body are dramatic. They range from thirst to stronger thirst, sleepiness, apathy, nausea, emotional instability, labored breathing and dizziness, delirium--and finally death. Infants, children, the elderly or physically ill persons are particularly susceptible to dehydration.

In addition to your stored water, there are a number of other possible sources of water in your home:
Water drained from the hot water tank if the tank remains upright.
Immediately after a major disaster, we can prevent contamination of our hot water tank supply by shutting off the water valve that leads from the water main into the house. To drain the tank, follow these instructions:
Turn off the gas or electric supply to the tank.
Close the water intake valve into the tank by closing the faucet at the top of the tank.
Drain water into a container by opening the faucet at the bottom of the tank. Never turn the gas or electricity back on until the valve is reopened and the tank is full of water.
Drain water every six months allowing water to drain until it flows clear. This process will ensure that the tank remains free of mineral and rust deposits and will also save on fuel!
Water remaining in the pipes.
If your home is multilevel, you can drain the existing water in the pipes by gravity flow, after the water line into the house has been shut off.
Open a faucet on the top floor and drain water from a faucet at the lowest level.
Water dipped from the flush tank (not bowl) of the toilet.
Purify water before using. Do not use chemically treated "blue" water.
Water from a swimming pool.
This water can be used for hygiene purposes only. If consumed, this water can cause diarrhea due to chlorine content and can even cause permanent kidney damage.


Purifying Water
If water is polluted, strain through paper towels, paper coffee filters, or several layers of clean cloth into a container to remove any sediment or flaking material. Then boil the water vigorously for 10 minutes, as this will usually make it safe to drink. Add one additional minute for each 10,000 feet of altitude, depending on the area you live in.

Another method of purification is to strain the water as described above, and then to chemically purify it by adding liquid bleach or tincture of iodine. Do not use granular forms of household bleach as they are poisonous.
For clear water, use two drops of bleach or three drops of tincture of iodine per liter. If the water is cloudy, then these amounts should be doubled. Store an eye dropper with your emergency supplies, to be used only for this purpose.
Mix thoroughly by stirring or shaking water in a container. Let the water stand for 30 minutes. A slight chlorine odor should be detectable. If not then the dosage should be repeated and the water allowed to stand for an additional 15 minutes.
Liquid bleach loses strength over time. For this reason I mark each bleach container with the current date. If the bleach is one-year-old, double the amount. Two-year-old bleach should not be used.
Water purification tablets will purify one liter of water. The tablets have a shelf life of two years and lose their effectiveness if them get damp.
Purify enough water to last a maximum of 48 hours. Water allowed to sit for longer than this may become re-contaminated.

More later...
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
yep...itsme (OP)

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08/30/2010 07:19 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
bump
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
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My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
Anonymous Coward
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08/31/2010 11:34 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
From a strictly survival point of view, water is the most important element for your body's survival.
 Quoting: yep...itsme


And SALT, not food, is the SECOND most important element.

Without salt, you can simply not drink enough water to stay alive. Your body will lose it faster than you can drink it.
yep...itsme (OP)

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08/31/2010 11:39 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
From a strictly survival point of view, water is the most important element for your body's survival.

And SALT, not food, is the SECOND most important element.

Without salt, you can simply not drink enough water to stay alive. Your body will lose it faster than you can drink it.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 471789

Yep, this is part of another paper I am working on for GLP and my blog.

I am trying to focus on one issue per thread. Thanks for the input!
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
yep...itsme (OP)

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09/01/2010 11:39 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Today I am going to give you additional information about your water supply and some thought about how you can best protect yourself from drinking contaminated water.
An e-mail I received asked a simple yet wonderful question:


How do Purifiers Differ From Filters?

To be identified as a water purifier, a device must conform to a US Environmental Protection Agency protocol (last revised in 1987). Purifiers are required to
"remove, kill or inactivate all types of disease-causing microorganisms from the water, including bacteria, viruses and protozoan cysts so as to render the processed water safe for drinking."
A device must inactivate 99.99 percent of viruses to be labeled as a purifier.

Does this mean purifiers are superior to filters? Not necessarily. Depending on conditions (when water is very cold or obviously contaminated, for example), manufacturers of iodine-based purifiers may recommend that users double-filter their water or significantly reduce the rate at which water is pumped through the unit. (The slower flow exposes water to the iodine or iodine resins for a longer period of time.) Sometimes resins must be allowed time to "recharge" after treating a few quarts of water.

While thats fine if you are camping, that procedure may not be possible or feasible in many, often chaotic survival situations.

Filter-makers contend that quality filters routinely capture 99 to 99.9 percent of viruses on the first pass since viruses (and bacteria) often become clumped with organic or mineral particles in water.

These clumps are easy for filters to trap. Still, when these clumps are "smashed" into the wall of a filtering element as you pump the water, it's possible a virus could separate from its clump and still slip through. Not really a chance I want to deal with. After all, how can you effectively bug out (or in) if your cache is down to a single roll of toilet paper and you are dehydrated from severe diarrhea?

Please Note: Pregnant women and people with thyroid conditions often have adverse reactions to iodine. Consult a physician before selecting a purifier.

The purifier-vs.-filter question stirs spirited debate among manufacturers. There is a movement within the industry to work toward a common filter and purifier standard through the American Society for Testing and Materials, but thus far I am not aware of a standard that has been agreed to.

How to Choose a Water Filter or Purifier

Is it possible to drink straight from backcountry streams and never become ill?
Yes.

Is it possible to drive down a large city's main boulevard, ignore a few red lights and never have a fender-bender?
Yes.

Is either practice worth the accompanying risks?
In my opinion, no.


Here's a brief overview to help clean up the confusion surrounding which type of water-treatment system is right for you.

While reading this, keep in mind the difference between a filter and a purifier.

While both remove bacteria from water particles using a mechanical process of pumping then forcing water through a filtering device, only purifiers can render viruses inactive using either an additional chemical or electrostatic process.

Waterborne viruses are believed to be less common in North American wilderness waters. But if you're traveling outside of the United States or Canada, you may want to opt for the more involved, and hence perhaps more expensive, purifying system.

When comparing filters and purifiers, look for an absolute—not nomimal—pore size of 0.2 microns. This industry wide benchmark indicates the system's smallest filtering capability. No bacteria larger than 0.2 microns can get through. Though a larger pore size of 0.3 or 0.4 may suffice in most situations, why take chances with your health, and possibly compromising your security due to incapacitation by way of dehydration?

Depending on its function, a water-treatment system can have numerous parts, some of which will need to be maintained or replaced on a regular basis.

If your survival plans include many nights away from a reliable water source, you will not only have to pack the filter but the back-up and replacement parts that go with it.

And finally, to get the cleanest water possible be sure to clean and dry your filtering system regularly. When in the outdoors, try your best to collect still, clear water. Whenever possible, boil the water before treating it. Then let the first few streams of water pass before you begin collecting your treated water.

The Truth About Clear Water

Free-flowing mountain streams, for all their beauty and clarity, are not always the fountains of purity we imagine them to be. Backcountry water sources — crystal-clear rivers, lakes and streams — sometimes harbor microscopic pathogens that are tough to pronounce, difficult to spell and, for most people, awful to ingest!

Giardia lamblia. Cryptosporidium. Campylobacter jejuni. Hepatitis A. All are members of an invisible fluvial zoo that may be present in pristine-looking backcountry water.

How do they get there? Simply, it's when water becomes tainted by animal or human feces. What impact could such microbes have? As mentioned twice in this report, they can leave you reeling with diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea, weight loss and fatigue. How long might these symptoms last? Between 4 and 6 weeks. Maybe longer! Not an acceptable risk in a survival situation. In addition, if you have small children, sever dehydration due to diarrhea and vomiting can be fatal!

Explaining Water Filters and Purifiers

Portable water filters and purifiers both operate on the same mechanical principle. Using a hand pump and intake hose, both typically slurp up "raw" water from a lake or stream and force it through an internal element (a filtering "medium"). This medium traps suspended elements — from fine sediment to invisible microorganisms — before dispensing clean water into a container of your choice.

What's the Difference?
Some definitions:
Water filter— A microbiological device that removes bacteria (e.g., Campylobacter jejuni) and protozoan cysts (Giardia lamblia, cryptosporidium) from contaminated water.
Water purifier— A microbiological device that removes bacteria, protozoan cysts and viruses (e.g., hepatitis A) from contaminated water

Viruses are infinitesimal organisms too tiny to be trapped by a filter. Devices identified as "purifiers" usually cause water to interact with iodine (often in the form of iodine resins), which can render viruses inactive. Another type of purifier uses a positive electrostatic charge in its filter medium to capture viruses.

Viruses:
1) May exist in water wherever there is a reasonable chance of human fecal contamination;
2) Are believed to be less prevalent in North American wilderness water sources than protozoan cysts or bacteria, but may be a greater threat in less developed countries.

Over time, filters have proven that they reliably protect wilderness travelers from the most common waterborne pathogens found in the North American backcountry: giardia and cryptosporidium. Still, purifiers and their antiviral feature offer an elevated level of security.

To fully disinfect suspect water using a water filter, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends:
1) Mechanically filtering the water;

2) Treating it with a halogen (chlorine or an iodine solution);

3) Letting it sit 15 to 60 minutes;

4) Then drinking or storing.

What Really Matters
In an ideal world, a water filter or purifier will be:
1)Simple to use
2)asy to pump
3)Capable of sustaining a steady, generous flow
4)Effective against waterborne pathogens
5)Slow to clog, easy to clean
6)Long-lasting

How can you tell if a filter or purifier delivers in these areas? Look for clues in the specification chart that accompanies each products description.

Here's how to interpret the information:
Filter medium— This is the cartridge that actually traps pathogens (plus silt and other debris). The composition of the medium contributes greatly to the quality (and cost) of a device.
Medium materials include:
Ceramic: This is an effective, high-quality earthen material that can be cleaned many times before it needs a replacement. A ceramic cartridge captures most particles within .005 of an inch of its surface, so it's easy to brush away clogged pores and expose new ones. Cartridges themselves are fragile and require careful handling. Ceramic elements are the longest-lasting mediums and make a good choice for frequent backcountry visitors.

Ceramic with a carbon core: This additional layer helps filter out the taste of halogens (chlorine and iodine) plus some organic chemicals, herbicides and pesticides.

Fiberglass (or glass fiber): As effective as ceramic in straining out pathogens, but not as long-lasting.

Structured matrix, or labyrinth: A dense, honeycombed material that effectively captures pathogens.

Iodine resin: A chemical layer integrated with a purifier's filtering medium that deactivates viruses, though it does not actually remove them.

Field cleanable: A desirable feature. This means you may open the filter to brush or scrub the filter medium and increase water flow. Clogging should not cause you alarm; it shows the filter or purifier is working. Ceramic filter media can usually accept dozens of cleanings. Some models can be cleaned through backwashing (feeding clean water through the filter in reverse) but you need ample clean water in order to do so.

Longevity: How long will a filter or purifier last? Ceramic filters that can accept cleaning will last the longest, but the life of any filter depends on the clarity of wateryou pump through it. If possible, seek out clear water in still pools. You're likely to find less sediment in such water than in rushing water. Use a prefilter if your device includes one. Manufacturers sometimes include an estimate of the number of liters a filter or purifier is expected to treat effectively.

Pump force: The higher the number, the harder it is to pump. The Katadyn Pocket Filter, for example, has a pump force number of 16.5. While this is one of the longest-lasting filters available, it really gives users a workout as they pump

Effectiveness: Most of the filters and purifiers you will find will knock out larger microorganisms such as giardia and cryptosporidia. So what do you get for choosing a more expensive filter? Usually a longer-lasting filter medium, cleanability features and maybe a more efficient pump handle.

Which filter is right for you? Here's a basic guide:

If you're on a very strict budget, and you are building a three-day bag, it's possible that an inexpensive filter will serve you well. Still, be careful about what type of water you send through it. Make it as clear as possible and the filter will last longer.

If you are bugging out, seek out a field-cleanable model designed to provide years of service, and with the strongest body and pump handle you can find.
Both in and out survivalist are candidates for a purifier.

Pore size: A familiar benchmark for determining a filter's effectiveness is to establish that it is a "point-2 (0.2-micron) filter." The number refers to the size of the pores (openings) in a filter medium. It's not a bad gauge, since the smallest bacteria measure 0.2 microns, yet some microbiologists will tell you it is a simplistic standard.
Factors such as maximum flow rate, minimum wall thickness and adsorptive capacity can influence such a conclusion. Arguments can be made to show that a 0.3- or 0.4-micron filter can be as effective at trapping the particles as a 0.2-micron filter.

Tip: Look for "absolute" pore size (the largest and least effective holes) when evaluating filters, not "nominal" pore size.

Adsorption: When filter media block particles while clean water streams through, the process is known as "sieving." When particles stick to the media in the manner of a magnet, this is "adsorption." Activated carbon, found in some filters and purifiers, is especially effective at adsorption

Replacement cartridges are available for many of the filters and purifiers you may encounter They cost roughly one-half of the original unit's cost, and space permitting, I highly recommend adding a spare filter a parts kit to your bag(s)
Some models attach directly to specific water bottles,which is a nice touch. It can prevent a heartbreaking spill in the field, but if your holding container is lost or broken, you will have to McGuyver one to be protected. Be advised.

If you're visiting places where turbid water is a factor (say, the desert southwest), a cleanable ceramic filter should be tops on your list. The same goes if you'll be filtering for a group.

So, because it bears repeating:

1) Avoid filtering water in area where animal or human activity is obvious.

2) Try and filter water from still, clear water sources. Many microorganisms tend to sink to the bottom of still water; a turbulent stream keeps them suspended.

3) Rather than filter directly from the stream or lake, put water in a pot and filter from that. This gives you a chance to examine exactly how the water looks before you send it through your filter. This helps prevent clogging. If the water is cloudy, let it sit in the pot for an hour or so, then skim the clearest water off the top.

4)Don't save the first few streams of output from your filter. They don't taste as fresh.

5) When you clean your filter, recognize you are handling a potentially contaminated object.

6) Don't handle food or put your hands to your mouth after cleaning your filter. I always wear gloves. Latex or nitril gloves are cheap and easy to pack. I ALWAYS have 3 pairs in a ziploc bag in various areas...my utility pocket in my pants, in my jacket sleeve, as well as several areas of my packs.

7)Follow manufacturer instructions for cleaning and storage.
If you are bugging in, consider pumping a weak bleach-and-water solution through the filter to sterilize it. If you can disassemble your unit, ALWAYS allow it to dry out completely before storing it for maximum life and usefullness.


More later...
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
yep...itsme (OP)

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09/01/2010 12:25 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
BumpityBump
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
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My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
Anonymous Coward
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09/01/2010 12:42 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
5* bump
Anonymous Coward
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09/01/2010 12:43 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
ONE GALLON PER DAY PER PERSON
slaphim
yep...itsme (OP)

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09/01/2010 12:50 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
ONE GALLON PER DAY PER PERSON
slaphim
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1085272


I store a gallon per life per day (pets are here also)

But, most experts will Tell you that a normally active person requires half of that.

A gallon of water weighs 8.35 pounds, so this means when you are using a lightweight water container and holder, each persons three day kit will have between 25 and 30 POUNDS of water...plus any pets. If you have small children, you really wont see them carry 30 pounds for long or for far.

Ration your Rations, carry a filter and a purifier and stay hydrated.
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
yep...itsme (OP)

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09/01/2010 11:57 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
bump
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
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My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
Anonymous Coward
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09/02/2010 12:06 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Over on flutrackers is a recipe for proper hydration, which includes a salt/sugar ratio to water. Might want to check it out.....
Anonymous Coward
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09/02/2010 12:10 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
You all might find this valuable ;)

[link to www.flutrackers.com]
Anonymous Coward
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09/02/2010 12:12 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Here we go, Oral Rehydration:

----snip>
Making your own ORS

The bottom line, of course, is how to make a cheap, safe, and effective ORS powder yourself.

The simplest formula is 3 Tablespoons of sugar, and 1 teaspoon of salt, dissolved in 1 quart of potable water.

An alternative simple formula is 8 teaspoons of sugar, and 1 teaspoon of salt, dissolved in 1 quart of potable water.


------<
sum_peeps

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09/02/2010 05:25 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
If you're in the middle of nowhere and don't have coffee filters or whatever, then you can make a simple filter with charcoal and other stuff, charcoal is the main ingredient in water purifiers b/c it removes heavy metals.

yep...itsme (OP)

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09/02/2010 10:13 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Nice ad! We should talk sometine...


To all, because I have been asked twice now:
The plan for these posts I am making is to have a single thread for each basic issue and a separate thread showing all links to each report including links to external sites for more information and/or suppliers of quality goods.

Basically, I plan on posting the following reports:
1) Water - How much do I need?
{posted and adding currently}
2) Food - What should I carry, what should I cache?
3) Prepping Primer - Where Do I Start?
4) Communications -Staying in touch
5) When SHTF
{posted and adding currently}
6) The Bug out Bag
{posted and adding currently}
7) Personal security - its easier than you think!
8) Clothing
9) Reading material- and you thought school was over!
10)Survival - Can I take my iPod and mini DVD?

So, thats the general idea, and they aren't listed in any particular order. My hope is that if you are already a prepper, I might give you some ideas that you might not have thought of, and if you are new to disaster preparation it can give you a solid foundation to which you can build.

If you like this series and would like me to continue, please help me keep it on page one as the mods seem to often pin everything except something that can actually help someone.

Jessie

Last Edited by yep...itsme on 09/02/2010 10:20 AM
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
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My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
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Gunsmith

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09/03/2010 03:04 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
I use a Sawyer filter and it hasn't ever done me wrong. It last for a million gallons unlike most filters which have to be replaced often.
yep...itsme (OP)

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09/03/2010 09:47 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
I use a Sawyer filter and it hasn't ever done me wrong. It last for a million gallons unlike most filters which have to be replaced often.
 Quoting: Gunsmith


Did you get the premimum kit with two bags? I was looking at that but went with the standard kit for my three day plus kit.

I am in the market for another and am thinking it might be more space effective to have that one for my bug-out pack.
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
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My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
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Gunsmith

User ID: 1078889
United States
09/08/2010 12:47 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
Yes, it is the two bag two liter one, but it is easily converted into a 5 gal bucket setup they use in third world countries. If I had a cabin I would do the bucket setup but I needed something portable. It works great and I carry chlorine tabs to pre treat if I am really worried about the water. It works great, just remember to back flush it from time to time.
yep...itsme (OP)

User ID: 912389
United States
09/13/2010 09:53 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
bump
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
yep...itsme (OP)

User ID: 912389
United States
09/15/2010 10:56 PM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
bump
Peace is not the absence of conflict... it is the presence of justice.
-------------------------------------
My Survival thread:
Thread: Survival Preparation: A Series of Threads Designed To Help You Prepair Yourself!
-------------------------------------
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1099214
Italy
09/16/2010 02:02 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
1 teaspoon of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to a quart of water.


what the heck?
household chlorine is made of industrial waste...it's composition is quite unpredictable but surely is full of heavy metals... Now in the market some chlorine brand use to advertise some product without a specific heavy metal...
but they are still full of others
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 694586
United States
09/16/2010 02:16 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
get three months worth of distilled
some water is better than no water
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 694586
United States
09/16/2010 02:18 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
WHO says add bleach

we could use hydrogen peroxide

1 teaspoon of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to a quart of water.


what the heck?
household chlorine is made of industrial waste...it's composition is quite unpredictable but surely is full of heavy metals... Now in the market some chlorine brand use to advertise some product without a specific heavy metal...
but they are still full of others
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1099214
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 694586
United States
09/16/2010 02:23 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
but not giardia (from expired animals at other end of stream) bacterial infection and organisms of ills

so we should boil

If you're in the middle of nowhere and don't have coffee filters or whatever, then you can make a simple filter with charcoal and other stuff, charcoal is the main ingredient in water purifiers b/c it removes heavy metals.


 Quoting: sum_peeps
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1099214
Italy
09/16/2010 06:04 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
for look sodium chlorite at your pharmacy
be really careful with quantities
FWIW
User ID: 33382770
United States
11/01/2013 09:47 AM
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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
An excellent and easy hydrating solution to remember:

One pinch salt to one palmfull of sugar to eight ounces of clean water. Taken half a mouthful at a time as tolerated.
Judethz
Israel is Eternal

User ID: 47012985
United Kingdom
11/01/2013 09:51 AM

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Re: Survival Preparation - #2 in a series: Water - How much do I need?
kitty Get one of these. [link to youtu.be]

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