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Message Subject ALERT!!! This is How the Mass Bird Death Happened - The New Madrid Fault may produce MASSIVE EARTHQUAKE soon!
Poster Handle Gizzie
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Carbon Dioxide (CO2)


Carbon dioxide (chemical formula CO2) is a naturally occurring chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. It is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and exists in Earth's atmosphere in this state, as a trace gas at a concentration of 0.039% by volume.

Carbon dioxide also is a by-product of combustion; is emitted from volcanoes, hot springs, and geysers; and is freed from carbonate rocks by dissolution.

As of November 2011, carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere is at a concentration of 390 ppm by volume.[3] Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide fluctuate slightly with the change of the seasons.

Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas as it transmits visible light but absorbs strongly in the infrared and near-infrared, before slowly re-emitting the infrared at the same wavelength as what was absorbed.

Before the advent of human-caused release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, concentrations tended to increase with increasing global temperatures, acting as a positive feedback for changes induced by other processes such as orbital cycles.

Concentrations of 7% to 10% cause dizziness, headache, visual and hearing dysfunction, and unconsciousness within a few minutes to an hour.

Up to 40% of the gas emitted by some volcanoes during subaerial eruptions is carbon dioxide.[38] It is estimated that volcanoes release about 130–230 million tonnes (145–255 million tons) of CO2 into the atmosphere each year. Carbon dioxide is also produced by hot springs such as those at the Bossoleto site near Rapolano Terme in Tuscany, Italy. Here, in a bowl-shaped depression of about 100 m diameter, local concentrations of CO2 rise to above 75% overnight, sufficient to kill insects and small animals, but it warms rapidly when sunlit and the gas is dispersed by convection during the day.[39] Locally high concentrations of CO2, produced by disturbance of deep lake water saturated with CO2 are thought to have caused 37 fatalities at Lake Monoun, Cameroon in 1984 and 1700 casualties at Lake Nyos, Cameroon in 1986.[40] Emissions of CO2 by human activities are currently more than 130 times greater than the quantity emitted by volcanoes, amounting to about 27 billion tonnes per year

Carbon dioxide disolves in the ocean to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), bicarbonate (HCO3-) and carbonate (CO32-), and there is about fifty times as much carbon dissolved in the sea water of the oceans as exists in the atmosphere. The oceans act as an enormous carbon sink, and have taken up about a third of CO2 emitted by human activity.[42]

As the concentration of carbon dioxide increases in the atmosphere, the increased uptake of carbon dioxide into the oceans is causing a measureable decrease in the pH of the oceans which is referred to as ocean acidification. Although the natural absorption of CO2 by the world's oceans helps mitigate the climatic effects of anthropogenic emissions of CO2, results in a decrease in the pH of the oceans. This reduciton in pH impacts the biological systems in the oceans, primarily oceanic calcifying organisms. These impacts span the food chain from autotrophs to heterotrophs and include organisms such as coccolithophores, corals, foraminifera, echinoderms, crustaceans and molluscs. Under normal conditions, calcite and aragonite are stable in surface waters since the carbonate ion is at supersaturating concentrations. However, as ocean pH falls, so does the concentration of this ion, and when carbonate becomes undersaturated, structures made of calcium carbonate are vulnerable to dissolution. Even if there is no change in the rate of calcification, therefore, the rate of dissolution of calcareous material increases

[link to en.wikipedia.org]
 Quoting: Gizzie


Some more reading for you guys...not going to post it all, had a quick look through them, very interesting.. here are the links:

Limnic eruption: [link to en.wikipedia.org]

Methane: [link to en.wikipedia.org]

Methanogenesis: [link to en.wikipedia.org]

Atmospheric methane: [link to en.wikipedia.org]
 
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