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This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.

 
Jude11
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02/21/2011 05:30 PM
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This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
It's also good to try it out now. I am a professional baker and can tell you that it works, it's easy and tastes like bread should!

I like to experiment with adding herbs to the dough like garlic and onion powder, oregano, basil, thyme etc. Tried raisins and cinnamon...fantastic!

Have also made this in an outdoor clay oven and yay!

* 1 1/2 tablespoons yeast
* 1 1/2 tablespoons salt coarse salt.
* 3 cups water
* 6.5 cups flour ( I like 1/2 and 1/2 white and cracked wheat), more for dusting dough.
* Cornmeal

1. In a large bowl (I use a pail and a loosely applied lid), mix yeast and salt into 3 cups warm water. Add flour, and stir to combine completely. Let dough rise in a warm place for at least two hours, until it rises and collapses (up to 5 hours – or even overnight won’t hurt it). The dough may be baked at this point, or refrigerated for later use.

2. Cover dough, but make sure it is not airtight – gases need to escape – and place in fridge. When you are ready to use it, throw a small fistful of flour on the surface and use a serrated knife to cut off a piece of the size you desire. (recommend a 1 pound loaf – which means cutting off grapefruit-sized piece of dough). Turning the dough in your hands, stretch the surface of the dough and tuck in under. The surface will be smooth, and the bottom with be bunched.

3. Dust a pizza peel (or any flat surface – I use a rimless cookie sheet) with cornmeal. (This prevents sticking, and adds a nice, rustic crunch. You can use flour instead, but you’ll need to use a very generous dusting). Allow dough to rest in a warm place for 40 minutes – longer (up to an hour and a half) if you use some whole wheat flour in place of the white, or if you make a larger loaf.

4. Twenty minutes before baking, preheat oven to 450 degrees with baking stone (or overturned baking sheet) inside on the middle rack, plus a shallow pan on the top rack. Throw a small fistful of flour over the dough, slash it 2-4 times with a serrated knife (in a cross, a tic-tac-toe, or a fan), and slide it into the oven, onto the baking stone. Throw 1-2 cups of tap water into the shallow pan, and quickly shut the oven door to trap steam inside. Bake for 30 minutes, or until crust is well browned and bread sounds hollow when you knock on the bottom.

Thought I would add a pemmican video as well. Can't say enough about this stuff. High on protein, vitamins and very filling. Keeps well and easy to carry:



More great survival food vids here:


[link to www.youtube.com]

I guess I'm back after being banned (IP Issues)

Would like to revive this thread if there is enough interest.

Let me start with that I have decided to sell my properties on the East Coast (In light of recent events both political and natural) and we are heading to the prairies!

Gonna work on a few new bread recipes this week as well as post another series on home preservation and canning.

Hope everyone is well and still positive. Man! I missed this place. :)

Been spending time on a few other sites but this felt like home for awhile.

Anyhoo....

Plans: Got a lead on some acreage and looking at ponds, lakes, river access as well as land for the gardens of course. The new clay oven is going to happen as I have found material suppliers out there so my plan is to post videos of the process and finished products. I have to leave my old clay oven and that'll be sad as I just got it seasoned.

Next is T-Biscuits...got a killer recipe that makes these things pop up like balloons. :) Easy , Cheap and gut-Filling!

Will check in and update.

Stop in and say hello again if you are still here. Will appreciate it!

Jude11

Last Edited by Jude11 on 03/20/2011 06:35 PM
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 05:33 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 05:35 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1267482


Hey American ASSWIPE!

Notice the "CLAY OVEN" reference? Too stupid and lazy to read before posting is my guess.
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 05:38 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1267482


Also, no fridge?...put it outside. Or is that too much creative thinking for you?
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 05:41 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1267482


RAW BREAD! Sun dried. Sprout any grains you wish until the little sprout just breaks through. drain FULLY and then grind up in whatever you have to grind in. Good reason to have some sort of grinder that does not use electricity. Work in salt and yeast as you grind it. By the way, I think I need to get a mechanical grinder. I may have a tool that will work, that I used to use to puree stuff.

if the mess is too wet add a bit of flour if you have some. shape into thin easy to use pieces and dry in the sun. will work.
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 05:43 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
RAW BREAD! Sun baked. Sprout any grains you wish until they little sprout just breaks through. drain carefully and then grind up in whatever you have to grind in. Good reason to have some sort of grinder that does not use electricity. Work in salt and yeast as your grind it. By the way, I think I need to get a mechanical grinder.

if the mess is too wet ad a bit of flour if you have some. shape into thin easy to use pieces and dry in the sun. will work.


Tried this once, works well.
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 05:46 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
it's also more nutrious, because the sprouting causes all sorts of vitamins to be made.
And if there is no electricity for an extended period of time, flour will be hard to come by unless you also own a stone grinder that doesn't use electricity. Hey in the olden days people made bread and all sorts of stuff sans electricity.
Nathan Drake

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02/21/2011 05:49 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
Hard tack doesnt need yeast and can last a long time if not exposed to dampness. Just soften it up in your favorite drink, stew, etc before eating.
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 05:54 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
true but yeast does had vitamins to the mix. In the case of no electricity, how many of you even have a supply of grains, and seeds etc to use? Sprouting seeds until the grow green spouts will give you the salad you need too. of course is you are out of WATER that is decent, you are up shit crick, no matter what.
Anonymous Coward
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
ALMOST NO-KNEAD BREAD (aka Crusty Beer Bread)

This is the recipe from cooks Illustrated a number ofyears ago. The original recipe calls for mild-flavored lager and white vinegar. Any beer and any vinegar works. This is a rustic great tasting bread. Easy to make.

3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon instant yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
scant cup water, room temperature
6 tablespoons (3 oz) beer
1 tablespoon vinegar

Stir flour, yeast and salt in a large mixing bowl. In a 2-cup measuring cup, combine the water, beer and vinegar and add to the flour mixture. Stir until mixture forms a shaggy ball and incorporates all the dry flour. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 8 to 18 hours, as your schedule permits. (perhaps overnight)

Lay a sheet of parchment paper in a 10 inch skillet and spray with cooking spray. Transfer dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead 10-15 times. Shape dough into a ball by pulling edges to the middle. Transfer the dough to the parchment lined skillet and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Let rise at room temperature until dough has doubled insize and does not readily spring back when poked with finger, (about 2 hours). Just before placing in overn cut a 1/2 inch deep slice on the top down the middle of the dough.

About 30 minutes before baking, place a 6-8 quart covered Dutch oven into oven and preheat to 500 degrees. Once preheated, using the parchment paper, lift the dough and place it in the Dutch oven. Cover. Reduce the temperature to 425 degrees immediately. Bake covered for 30 minutes. Uncover the pan and continue to bake for another 15-20 minutes until bread is golden brown. Remove bread from pan and cool on a rack.
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 05:59 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
Bannock
Recipe #1 Simple bannock
2 ½ cups of flour
2 tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
3 tblsp lard
1 cup cold water (approx)
Let's not forget the all time easiest campfire bread....BANNOCK!

Mix the dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Add the lard and mix in thoroughly. Gradually add the water (you may not need it all) and mix until the dough is thoroughly dampened, but not sticky.
Knead the dough on a floured board for 30 seconds. Flatten the dough to 1/2" thick. Cut into 8 pieces, and fry in a lightly greased frying pan, on medium heat, for 12-15 minutes each side.


Recipe #2: Bannock for six
3 cups of white flour
2 cups of whole wheat flour
½ cup of bran
½ cup of wheat germ
2 tbsp of baking powder
1 tsp of salt
2/3 cup of shortening
2/3 cup of milk powder



Tips for making Bannock
Tip #1

There are no rules. As you can see, the two recipes listed above are quite different. Bannock is usually made from whatever ingredients you have on hand. The recipe will be altered to create the type of mixture you require, for whatever method you are cooking it. Minimum ingredients would include some type of flour, and a liquid to bind the flour together. I have eaten bannock made from just flour and water, cooked on a hot rock, in an open fire, and I found it to be delicious. However, if you took the same two ingredients, and mixed in too much liquid, you will create a great glue for paper mache. In order to make great bannock, you must practice, practice, practice. Typical bannock recipes might include ingredients from the following categories:

Flour
white all purpose, whole wheat, cracked wheat, etc…
Exotic types of flour could include flour made from the roots of plants, and the inner bark of trees.
Rendered Fat
butter, margarine, cooking oil, bacon grease and lard are among the modern favorites

Baking Powder
nice if you want the bannock to be fluffy and light in texture.

Salt
a pinch will help bring out the flavors

Sugar
brown is my favorite.

Tip #2

Always thourally mix the dry ingredients, then add the fat and mix again until it is all absorbed. Lastly add the water, a little at a time, until you have a dough of the right consistency for your cooking method.


Tip #3

There are many things you can add to Bannock to alter it's taste.


* flavored instant oatmeal can change taste and texture
* milk, either powdered or dry, will cause the bannock to brown when baked
* adding cornmeal, or rolled oats can change the texture
* any sweet liquid can be a substitute for both sugar, and moisture.
Some examples are corn syrup, maple syrup, honey, orange juice, Baileys, etc…
* add instant coffee, or cinnamon
* try adding candied fruit, brown sugar, and cinnamon for a dessert style bread.


Tip #4

Cooking methods can change both taste and texture

* Baking in an oven usually produces a light, airy type of bannock
* If you roast it over, or in an open fire, the bannock will pick up some of the smoke flavor of the fire.
* It will absorb the flavor of any type of fat you fry it in.
* If thinned out, and poured into a hot, dry skillet, you will have hot cakes
* You can steam raw dough on top of any type of stew to create dumplings.


Tip #5

Experiment with different combinations of ingredients and cooking methods in order to discover which work best for you. To help you along, try some of the recipes listed below.

Australian Damper

Mix up your favorite Bannock recipe.
Add dried fruit. Wrap and seal in foil,
Bury it at bottom of fire for about half an hour. Extract cooked fruit bread from foil.
The outside will probably be burned, and can just be committed to the flames.
The centre can be removed, smothered with butter, and enjoyed.

Bannock on a stick

When in the bush, this is probably one of the easiest ways to cook bannock, and there are no dishes to clean. You should use a green stick. The bark can be left on, or taken off, as desired, but you should try and find a stick that does not have a bitter taste to it, or the bitterness will be absorbed by the bannock. Just take a strip of bannock and wrap it around the green stick, so it looks like the stripe on a candy cane. Set up a rest so you will not have to hold the stick over the coals.

It is not very difficult to master the art of cooking this way if you remember one simple thing. The heat has to have time to penetrate inside whatever you are cooking. If you have your food too close to the fire, it will burn on the outside, and still be cold, or raw on the inside. Rule of thumb tells you to keep larger items farther away from the fire, so they will cook slower and more evenly than smaller items.
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 06:01 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
It's also good to try it out now. I am a professional baker and can tell you that it works, it's easy and tastes like bread should!

I like to experiment with adding herbs to the dough like garlic and onion powder, oregano, basil, thyme etc. Tried raisins and cinnamon...fantastic!

Have also made this in an outdoor clay oven and yay!

* 1 1/2 tablespoons yeast
* 1 1/2 tablespoons salt coarse salt.
* 3 cups water
* 6.5 cups flour ( I like 1/2 and 1/2 white and cracked wheat), more for dusting dough.
* Cornmeal

1. In a large bowl (I use a pail and a loosely applied lid), mix yeast and salt into 3 cups warm water. Add flour, and stir to combine completely. Let dough rise in a warm place for at least two hours, until it rises and collapses (up to 5 hours – or even overnight won’t hurt it). The dough may be baked at this point, or refrigerated for later use.

2. Cover dough, but make sure it is not airtight – gases need to escape – and place in fridge. When you are ready to use it, throw a small fistful of flour on the surface and use a serrated knife to cut off a piece of the size you desire. (recommend a 1 pound loaf – which means cutting off grapefruit-sized piece of dough). Turning the dough in your hands, stretch the surface of the dough and tuck in under. The surface will be smooth, and the bottom with be bunched.

3. Dust a pizza peel (or any flat surface – I use a rimless cookie sheet) with cornmeal. (This prevents sticking, and adds a nice, rustic crunch. You can use flour instead, but you’ll need to use a very generous dusting). Allow dough to rest in a warm place for 40 minutes – longer (up to an hour and a half) if you use some whole wheat flour in place of the white, or if you make a larger loaf.

4. Twenty minutes before baking, preheat oven to 450 degrees with baking stone (or overturned baking sheet) inside on the middle rack, plus a shallow pan on the top rack. Throw a small fistful of flour over the dough, slash it 2-4 times with a serrated knife (in a cross, a tic-tac-toe, or a fan), and slide it into the oven, onto the baking stone. Throw 1-2 cups of tap water into the shallow pan, and quickly shut the oven door to trap steam inside. Bake for 30 minutes, or until crust is well browned and bread sounds hollow when you knock on the bottom.
 Quoting: Jude11


Yes, back to basics, thank you.

hf
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 06:01 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
Thanks for the posts. I was looking for a good bread recipe.
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 06:11 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
Thanks for the posts. I was looking for a good bread recipe.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 803572


The great thing about these recipes, mine and the other posters, is that they are easy and can be done with a few ingredients by anyone.
Monkeyfister

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02/21/2011 06:15 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1267482


How To Make An Earth Oven: [link to www.google.com]

Recipe scaled-down-- made as needed, no fridge necessary. Bake it all, and save a loaf or two... barter/sell the rest.

Also worth knowing: A good sourdough starter, fed properly, keeps fine in a Mason jar set in a bowl of water in a cool, dark cupboard in a southern US home with no AC in Summer for at least four days, from my own experience. I baked bread every day in a power outage. If you have a spring house, or a root cellar, this dough will overnight fine in a covered bowl. Put its covered contained in the water-- not covering it, or in a root cellar-- put its bowl in a larger bowl of water. Anything like this, if kept at under 60-degrees F will overnight just fine.

Excellent bread recipe!

Does anyone have advice on keeping yeasts alive when the power goes out?
"I'm the bride at every funeral, I'm the corpse at every wedding..." --Brother Theodore
... and don't blame me-- I voted for Bob Barr in 2008.
Only COWARDS hide behind anonymous Karma.
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 06:16 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
yes and cheaper than buying, and without preservatives, dough conditioners and lots of other shit I don't even know what is, in bread. I don't buy any of that stuff, when I do buy bread.
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 06:18 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
thanks for the recipes op.
anonimalle

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02/21/2011 06:21 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1267482


"Have also made this in an outdoor clay oven"
That is what the op wrote.... As for you, you are just an idiot. The op wrote this out of kindness and you respond like a jerk.

Op thank you. I have saved it to a file and printed it.
Behind every myth lies a mystery, and every legend holds an echo of the truth …… anonimalle

" At the siege of Vienna in 1683 Islam seemed poised to overrun Christian Europe. We are in a new phase of a very old war."

Gates of Vienna.

"May we smite our enemies to the darkest chamber of hell, for we wish only to live in peace, and they desire only to put their boot upon our neck."
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 06:21 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1267482


How To Make An Earth Oven: [link to www.google.com]

Recipe scaled-down-- made as needed, no fridge necessary. Bake it all, and save a loaf or two... barter/sell the rest.

Also worth knowing: A good sourdough starter, fed properly, keeps fine in a Mason jar set in a bowl of water in a cool, dark cupboard in a southern US home with no AC in Summer for at least four days, from my own experience. I baked bread every day in a power outage. If you have a spring house, or a root cellar, this dough will overnight fine in a covered bowl. Put its covered contained in the water-- not covering it, or in a root cellar-- put its bowl in a larger bowl of water. Anything like this, if kept at under 60-degrees F will overnight just fine.

Excellent bread recipe!

Does anyone have advice on keeping yeasts alive when the power goes out?
 Quoting: Monkeyfister


[link to www.thefreshloaf.com]

Natural levains were used by bakers of the past and still are by many TFL members. What we call sourdough is called levain by the French. I don't think there were any alternatives until the introduction of commercial yeast.

Yeast are single-celled fungi, so there's plenty around. You don't need fruits, veggies, etc. to create a sourdough culture. As the wild yeast lives on the wheat and rye berries, it's also present in the flour. No hunting for wild yeast is necessary.

That's your sustainable source that you can create and keep alive. You can take it a step further after you have a mature and strong sourdough starter by drying portions. I imagine you could probably dry a few pounds of it. Drying instructions have been posted here in the last month or so. As I recall, it's just a matter of smearing some sourdough starter on waxed paper, letting it dry, then keeping it in an airtight container.
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 06:22 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1267482


Hey American ASSWIPE!

Notice the "CLAY OVEN" reference? Too stupid and lazy to read before posting is my guess.
 Quoting: Jude11


Americans can't read or spell.
anonimalle

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02/21/2011 06:24 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
bump
Behind every myth lies a mystery, and every legend holds an echo of the truth …… anonimalle

" At the siege of Vienna in 1683 Islam seemed poised to overrun Christian Europe. We are in a new phase of a very old war."

Gates of Vienna.

"May we smite our enemies to the darkest chamber of hell, for we wish only to live in peace, and they desire only to put their boot upon our neck."
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 06:25 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
so who provides the electricity for the fridge and gas for the stove during the times ahead ? I know the sekeret power fairy , right ?

you stupid canuck fuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1267482


Hey American ASSWIPE!

Notice the "CLAY OVEN" reference? Too stupid and lazy to read before posting is my guess.
 Quoting: Jude11


Americans can't read or spell.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1272682


Actually, I'm not into bashing anyone over an invisible border. Just trying to give out a little advice to any who wants it.
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 06:29 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
More bread recipes please! Ideas on storage, yeast, milling etc. This to me is the most valuable info we can share.
anonimalle

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02/21/2011 06:32 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
bump
 Quoting: anonimalle


Do any of you know that you can gather yeast from the air?

Not likely to be able to buy it at the store.
Behind every myth lies a mystery, and every legend holds an echo of the truth …… anonimalle

" At the siege of Vienna in 1683 Islam seemed poised to overrun Christian Europe. We are in a new phase of a very old war."

Gates of Vienna.

"May we smite our enemies to the darkest chamber of hell, for we wish only to live in peace, and they desire only to put their boot upon our neck."
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 06:32 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
op my wife should be taking care of all this baking stuff but she won't do a damn thing to prepare. not a thing. won't even think about it. i happen to have a lot of grain. red winter wheat,local wheat, oats, rye and barley. i have 3 hand mills. i respect a loaf of bread because it takes 3 or 4 minutes of hard work to make the flour.

if she doesn't get up to speed i could just make flat bread. if i buy yeast how long will it last? i really don't know this stuff. any other ingredient beyond the basics that we should have?
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 06:35 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
Where the Fuck do I get yeast?
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 06:36 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
bump
 Quoting: anonimalle


Do any of you know that you can gather yeast from the air?

Not likely to be able to buy it at the store.
 Quoting: anonimalle



Sustainable, off-grid yeast:


[link to www.thefreshloaf.com]
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 06:37 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
Where the Fuck do I get yeast?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1266791


Sustainable, off-grid yeast:


[link to www.thefreshloaf.com]

Last Edited by Jude11 on 02/21/2011 06:38 PM
Anonymous Coward
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02/21/2011 06:38 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
Some people can't have yeasted bread and some just don't want to take the time to make bread. Or you are just out of yeast.

Here is a link to make tortillas. They are fast and nutritious. They can also be made out of doors on a skillet over a fire.

[link to www.texascooking.com]
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 06:39 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
Some people can't have yeasted bread and some just don't want to take the time to make bread. Or you are just out of yeast.

Here is a link to make tortillas. They are fast and nutritious. They can also be made out of doors on a skillet over a fire.

[link to www.texascooking.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1273063



Absolutely! Made a lot of this and it tastes great as well as easily transported. Good one!
Jude11 (OP)

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02/21/2011 06:44 PM
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Re: This bread recipe could be the difference between starving and eating in the times ahead.
No yeast bread:

Ingredients
4 cups flour
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tbsp baking soda
1½ cups water
2 tsp vinegar (cider or white) Have tried it without and works ok too.

Combine dry ingredients and mix. Combine water and vinegar. Add wet ingredients to dry and mix. Turn dough out onto floured surface and knead for two or three minutes (no need to overdo it). Shape into a round (about 1½ to 2 inches high), then place on pan. Dip a sharp knife into flour and cut an 'X' into the top of the loaf. Bake 40 minutes.