Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 2,921 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 2,206,157
Pageviews Today: 3,136,861Threads Today: 695Posts Today: 14,004
08:10 PM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1282542
United States
04/21/2011 01:59 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
Well there you have it folks, the government was not behind 9/11, Lee Harvey Oswald killed JFK and Obama was born in the US according to these puppets at CNN. Case closed!

[link to www.cnn.com]

Washington (CNN) -- Sex, lies and murder. Americans seem to love conspiracy theories and too-good-to-be-true rumors -- type "George W. Bush IQ" into Google and watch what you get -- especially when it comes to politics.

Did you know that George Washington wasn't the nation's first president? The Mob killed JFK. And, oh yeah, President Obama wasn't born in Hawaii.

All fun to talk about. And all wrong or at least without proof.

CNN takes a look at 11 political conspiracies, myths and urban legends and helps you tell fact from fiction.

1) The myth: George Washington wasn't the first U.S. president.

The facts: Theorists say it was actually John Hanson, the president of the Continental Congress, who served as the nation's first president, not George Washington.

That claim is simply false.

The office of "President of the United States" was created under the Constitution in 1787, long after Hanson died.

2) The rumor: George W. Bush has the lowest IQ of all the presidents.

The facts: A report by the Lovenstein Institute in 2001 found that George W. Bush had the lowest IQ of any president in the past 50 years. The report was discovered on the website lovenstein.org.

The problem? There is no Lovenstein Institute and no report.

Case solved.

3) The myth: Washington Redskins always predict the presidential winner.

The facts: The claim is that, since 1936, the outcome of the Washington Redskins' last home game before the presidential election has predicted the outcome of who wins the White House.

The way it works: If the Redskins lose, the incumbent party loses; if they win, the incumbent wins.

Although the circumstances have worked out for 17 elections in modern history, it is just another political superstition that pundits love to use -- or maybe to fill time.

In 2004, the Redskins lost to the Green Bay Packers 28-14 on October 31. Under the myth, incumbent President George W. Bush should have lost to Democratic Sen. John Kerry.

That was not the case. Kerry lost, too.

4) The myth: Sarah Palin didn't give birth to baby Trig.

The facts: Soon after Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin was announced as Sen. John McCain's 2008 presidential running mate, rumors abounded that her newborn son, Trig, who was born with Down syndrome, was not hers.

The McCain campaign, along with Palin herself, shot down the rumor.

Conspiracy theorists, now called "Trig Truthers," point to photos taken in late March of that year in which Palin's stomach appears, they say, to be flat -- not the image of an expectant mother. But other photos show her with a round stomach.

Then there's the question of why Palin waited so long to seek medical attention after her water broke during a trip to Texas. Reports indicate that it took more than 15 hours for her to get to a hospital after flying back to Alaska.

Some claimed that the baby, born in April, might have been that of teenage daughter Bristol. But Bristol gave birth to her own child, Tripp, in December. Myth busted.

5) The theory: The government was behind the September 11 attacks.

The facts: The September 11 terrorist attacks have become a lightning rod for conspiracy theorists who have offered alternative explanations to the horror of that day.

Some of the theories include that the U.S. government was behind the entire terror plot, including taking down the World Trade Center, in order to take the country to war in the Middle East; the Pentagon was not hit by a commercial plane but rather by a missile; and United Flight 93 did not crash after passengers stormed the cockpit, but an Air Force jet took it out.

Popular Mechanics magazine looked into the claims and was able to "debunk each of these assertions with hard evidence and a healthy dose of common sense."

6) The myth: Sen. John McCain had an illegitimate black child.

The facts: There was an effort during the 2000 GOP presidential primaries to start a smear campaign against John McCain, who was running a tight race against George W. Bush in South Carolina, saying the Arizona senator had an illegitimate black child.

In an interview with NBC's "Today Show" last year, political operative Karl Rove, who was said to have been behind the story, shot down the claim. He said he had "nothing to do" with the rumor, adding that it came from "a professor at Bob Jones University" and not the Bush campaign.

McCain and his wife, Cindy, have an adopted daughter from Bangladesh.

Bush ended up winning South Carolina 53% to 42%.

7) The charge: The Clintons were responsible for the death of Vince Foster.

The facts: In summer 1993, Vince Foster, deputy White House counsel in the Clinton administration and close friend to the first couple, was found dead in a federal park in northern Virginia. Investigators ruled it a suicide.

In 1994, the Arkansas Project -- an effort to discredit the Clintons -- raised the idea that the couple was responsible for the murder of Foster and others who may have had incriminating evidence against the former Arkansas governor.

Three investigations into the death turned up no evidence of a link. The Clintons have emphatically denied any involvement. The rumor, however, found its way into the media and GOP circles.

8) The charge: Rep. Gary Condit was involved in Chandra Levy's disappearance.

The facts: The 2001 disappearance of Chandra Levy, an intern for the federal Bureau of Prisons, drew national attention after her parents discovered a connection with then-Rep. Gary Condit, D-California.

He was never a suspect in the case but was questioned intensively for details as to Levy's whereabouts. Condit was also rumored to have had a sexual relationship with Levy an allegation he repeatedly refused to answer.

But Condit's semen was found on her underwear, according to an FBI biologist who testified at a trial in 2010.

Levy's body was found in a Washington park more than a year after her disappearance. Salvadoran immigrant Ingmar Guandique -- who was in prison for another crime -- was convicted in her killing and sentenced in 2011 to 60 years in prison.

9) The theory: Someone besides Lee Harvey Oswald killed JFK.

facts: Decades after President John F. Kennedy's assassination in Dallas, the shooting and the events that followed continue to fascinate many Americans.

Much of that interest rests on the theory that the assassination was the result of a conspiracy -- not the act of a lone gunman, Lee Harvey Oswald.

Theories include that Kennedy "was killed by CIA agents acting either out of anger over the Bay of Pigs or at the behest of Vice President Lyndon Johnson," by the KGB or by "mobsters mad at Kennedy's brother for initiating the prosecution of organized crime rings," according to Time magazine.

But the Warren Commission, established to investigate the assassination, found that Oswald was the lone gunman -- and that there was not a second shooter.

10) The myth: President Zachary Taylor was poisoned to death.

The facts: Taylor, the nation's 12th president, was rumored to have died after being poisoned with arsenic, possibly by his wife.

But the claim was debunked by DNA scientists in 1991.

Medical officials in Kentucky ruled that he was not poisoned but rather died because of natural causes, such as gastroenteritis. The results were obtained after testing Taylor's tissue samples.

"The question of whether he was poisoned or not will no longer hang over us," Coroner Richard F. Greathouse of Jefferson County told the New York Times. "We've put that to rest once and for all."

Arsenic was found, but state officials said it was in levels too low to be considered deadly.

11) The myth: Barack Obama wasn't born in the U.S.

The facts: CNN has investigated these claims by "birthers" who say the nation's 44th president was not born in America and thus is not eligible to be president.

The Obama team and the state of Hawaii released a certification of live birth that documents the president's birth on August 4, 1961, in Honolulu. This is not the original birth certificate but is a valid legal document. In Hawaii and other states, original birth certificates are not released when requested later.

The certificate, officials say, allows a person born in Hawaii to get a driver's license, purchase land and obtain a U.S. passport.

The "birthers" claim that Obama doesn't want to show the birth certificate because it may claim that he wasn't born in America.

But state officials -- including Gov. Neil Abercrombie and Dr. Chiyome Fukino, the former director of Hawaii's Department of Health -- said they saw the document, and Obama was born in the U.S.

In addition, his birth announcement appeared in two Honolulu papers. The announcements are provided to the newspapers by the Department of Health and not members of the public, according to officials
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1391506
United States
05/21/2011 03:35 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
lol

popular mechanics

lol..

i guess that's good enough for mainstream media and the general public

a magazine..
\\'hyte \\'olf

User ID: 1385845
United States
05/21/2011 03:40 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
Well there you have it folks, the government was not behind 9/11, Lee Harvey Oswald killed JFK and Obama was born in the US according to these puppets at CNN. Case closed!

[link to www.cnn.com]

Washington (CNN) -- Sex, lies and murder. Americans seem to love conspiracy theories and too-good-to-be-true rumors -- type "George W. Bush IQ" into Google and watch what you get -- especially when it comes to politics.

Did you know that George Washington wasn't the nation's first president? The Mob killed JFK. And, oh yeah, President Obama wasn't born in Hawaii.

All fun to talk about. And all wrong or at least without proof.

CNN takes a look at 11 political conspiracies, myths and urban legends and helps you tell fact from fiction.

1) The myth: George Washington wasn't the first U.S. president.

The facts: Theorists say it was actually John Hanson, the president of the Continental Congress, who served as the nation's first president, not George Washington.

That claim is simply false.

The office of "President of the United States" was created under the Constitution in 1787, long after Hanson died.

2) The rumor: George W. Bush has the lowest IQ of all the presidents.

The facts: A report by the Lovenstein Institute in 2001 found that George W. Bush had the lowest IQ of any president in the past 50 years. The report was discovered on the website lovenstein.org.

The problem? There is no Lovenstein Institute and no report.

Case solved.

3) The myth: Washington Redskins always predict the presidential winner.

The facts: The claim is that, since 1936, the outcome of the Washington Redskins' last home game before the presidential election has predicted the outcome of who wins the White House.

The way it works: If the Redskins lose, the incumbent party loses; if they win, the incumbent wins.

Although the circumstances have worked out for 17 elections in modern history, it is just another political superstition that pundits love to use -- or maybe to fill time.

In 2004, the Redskins lost to the Green Bay Packers 28-14 on October 31. Under the myth, incumbent President George W. Bush should have lost to Democratic Sen. John Kerry.

That was not the case. Kerry lost, too.

4) The myth: Sarah Palin didn't give birth to baby Trig.

The facts: Soon after Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin was announced as Sen. John McCain's 2008 presidential running mate, rumors abounded that her newborn son, Trig, who was born with Down syndrome, was not hers.

The McCain campaign, along with Palin herself, shot down the rumor.

Conspiracy theorists, now called "Trig Truthers," point to photos taken in late March of that year in which Palin's stomach appears, they say, to be flat -- not the image of an expectant mother. But other photos show her with a round stomach.

Then there's the question of why Palin waited so long to seek medical attention after her water broke during a trip to Texas. Reports indicate that it took more than 15 hours for her to get to a hospital after flying back to Alaska.

Some claimed that the baby, born in April, might have been that of teenage daughter Bristol. But Bristol gave birth to her own child, Tripp, in December. Myth busted.

5) The theory: The government was behind the September 11 attacks.

The facts: The September 11 terrorist attacks have become a lightning rod for conspiracy theorists who have offered alternative explanations to the horror of that day.

Some of the theories include that the U.S. government was behind the entire terror plot, including taking down the World Trade Center, in order to take the country to war in the Middle East; the Pentagon was not hit by a commercial plane but rather by a missile; and United Flight 93 did not crash after passengers stormed the cockpit, but an Air Force jet took it out.

Popular Mechanics magazine looked into the claims and was able to "debunk each of these assertions with hard evidence and a healthy dose of common sense."

6) The myth: Sen. John McCain had an illegitimate black child.

The facts: There was an effort during the 2000 GOP presidential primaries to start a smear campaign against John McCain, who was running a tight race against George W. Bush in South Carolina, saying the Arizona senator had an illegitimate black child.

In an interview with NBC's "Today Show" last year, political operative Karl Rove, who was said to have been behind the story, shot down the claim. He said he had "nothing to do" with the rumor, adding that it came from "a professor at Bob Jones University" and not the Bush campaign.

McCain and his wife, Cindy, have an adopted daughter from Bangladesh.

Bush ended up winning South Carolina 53% to 42%.

7) The charge: The Clintons were responsible for the death of Vince Foster.

The facts: In summer 1993, Vince Foster, deputy White House counsel in the Clinton administration and close friend to the first couple, was found dead in a federal park in northern Virginia. Investigators ruled it a suicide.

In 1994, the Arkansas Project -- an effort to discredit the Clintons -- raised the idea that the couple was responsible for the murder of Foster and others who may have had incriminating evidence against the former Arkansas governor.

Three investigations into the death turned up no evidence of a link. The Clintons have emphatically denied any involvement. The rumor, however, found its way into the media and GOP circles.

8) The charge: Rep. Gary Condit was involved in Chandra Levy's disappearance.

The facts: The 2001 disappearance of Chandra Levy, an intern for the federal Bureau of Prisons, drew national attention after her parents discovered a connection with then-Rep. Gary Condit, D-California.

He was never a suspect in the case but was questioned intensively for details as to Levy's whereabouts. Condit was also rumored to have had a sexual relationship with Levy an allegation he repeatedly refused to answer.

But Condit's semen was found on her underwear, according to an FBI biologist who testified at a trial in 2010.

Levy's body was found in a Washington park more than a year after her disappearance. Salvadoran immigrant Ingmar Guandique -- who was in prison for another crime -- was convicted in her killing and sentenced in 2011 to 60 years in prison.

9) The theory: Someone besides Lee Harvey Oswald killed JFK.

facts: Decades after President John F. Kennedy's assassination in Dallas, the shooting and the events that followed continue to fascinate many Americans.

Much of that interest rests on the theory that the assassination was the result of a conspiracy -- not the act of a lone gunman, Lee Harvey Oswald.

Theories include that Kennedy "was killed by CIA agents acting either out of anger over the Bay of Pigs or at the behest of Vice President Lyndon Johnson," by the KGB or by "mobsters mad at Kennedy's brother for initiating the prosecution of organized crime rings," according to Time magazine.

But the Warren Commission, established to investigate the assassination, found that Oswald was the lone gunman -- and that there was not a second shooter.

10) The myth: President Zachary Taylor was poisoned to death.

The facts: Taylor, the nation's 12th president, was rumored to have died after being poisoned with arsenic, possibly by his wife.

But the claim was debunked by DNA scientists in 1991.

Medical officials in Kentucky ruled that he was not poisoned but rather died because of natural causes, such as gastroenteritis. The results were obtained after testing Taylor's tissue samples.

"The question of whether he was poisoned or not will no longer hang over us," Coroner Richard F. Greathouse of Jefferson County told the New York Times. "We've put that to rest once and for all."

Arsenic was found, but state officials said it was in levels too low to be considered deadly.

11) The myth: Barack Obama wasn't born in the U.S.

The facts: CNN has investigated these claims by "birthers" who say the nation's 44th president was not born in America and thus is not eligible to be president.

The Obama team and the state of Hawaii released a certification of live birth that documents the president's birth on August 4, 1961, in Honolulu. This is not the original birth certificate but is a valid legal document. In Hawaii and other states, original birth certificates are not released when requested later.

The certificate, officials say, allows a person born in Hawaii to get a driver's license, purchase land and obtain a U.S. passport.

The "birthers" claim that Obama doesn't want to show the birth certificate because it may claim that he wasn't born in America.

But state officials -- including Gov. Neil Abercrombie and Dr. Chiyome Fukino, the former director of Hawaii's Department of Health -- said they saw the document, and Obama was born in the U.S.

In addition, his birth announcement appeared in two Honolulu papers. The announcements are provided to the newspapers by the Department of Health and not members of the public, according to officials
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1282542


And all of this is provided by the Lame Stream Media that is corporately owned and influenced by the government under a little known CIA directive called "Operation Mockingbird"...

Please...
"I Will Limit Your Access To My Reality..."

:WhyteWolf:
\\'hyte \\'olf

User ID: 1385845
United States
05/21/2011 03:42 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
OPERATION MOCKINGBIRD

[link to en.wikipedia.org]
"I Will Limit Your Access To My Reality..."

:WhyteWolf:
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1393296
Spain
05/21/2011 03:43 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
more than a few of these are true and happened. 911 was an inside job to start with.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1393168
United States
05/21/2011 03:44 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
lol

popular mechanics

lol..

i guess that's good enough for mainstream media and the general public

a magazine..
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1391506


So let me get this straight. Some guy with a camcorder who was PAID to make a 9/11 conspiracy movie because he couldn't get funding for the movie he wanted to make is a reliable source... but a well established journalistic news source that demands hard facts and actual expert sources (instead of conspiracy wack jobs doing home made 'experiments' in their back yards) is not reputable.

Have you ever considered making a longterm investment in your future by purchasing toll rights to bridges?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1320586
United States
05/21/2011 03:59 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
fuck me are your serious? yea lets just put 9/11 jfk and obama along with some tabloid rumors, that'll do it. holy shit. how fucking gullable do they think we are?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1320586
United States
05/21/2011 04:01 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
lol

popular mechanics

lol..

i guess that's good enough for mainstream media and the general public

a magazine..
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1391506


So let me get this straight. Some guy with a camcorder who was PAID to make a 9/11 conspiracy movie because he couldn't get funding for the movie he wanted to make is a reliable source... but a well established journalistic news source that demands hard facts and actual expert sources (instead of conspiracy wack jobs doing home made 'experiments' in their back yards) is not reputable.

Have you ever considered making a longterm investment in your future by purchasing toll rights to bridges?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1393168


lame, lame, lame very lame attempt at trolling. dont even start you pos shill fuck you
all_the_kings_horses
User ID: 1346228
United States
05/21/2011 04:14 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
well, I guess its some guy with a camcorder vs. a well established journalist source like Popular Mechanics.

There is no way the truth could be uncovered by some guy with a camcorder.

After all its an established fact that only the well established Pope knows Gods will. And only the well established authorized King James version of 1611 can be used if you want to really read "the" Bible.

The people are nothing and the President is everything. Whatever the President says must be truth, no need to listen to the voice of the people.

The authorities and the well established have the inside track to truth and reality.

lol

popular mechanics

lol..

i guess that's good enough for mainstream media and the general public

a magazine..
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1391506


So let me get this straight. Some guy with a camcorder who was PAID to make a 9/11 conspiracy movie because he couldn't get funding for the movie he wanted to make is a reliable source... but a well established journalistic news source that demands hard facts and actual expert sources (instead of conspiracy wack jobs doing home made 'experiments' in their back yards) is not reputable.

Have you ever considered making a longterm investment in your future by purchasing toll rights to bridges?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1393168
intrigued

User ID: 516293
United States
05/21/2011 04:28 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
Who was the shill, Andrea Mitchell, Greenspan's wife? Like anyone believes anything she says!
Texas Uncensored

User ID: 1392570
United States
05/21/2011 04:43 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
If you had any doubts about CNN's credibility, you now know that your doubts were well founded.

The Popular Mechanics version of 911 has been blown out of the water by several credible groups of real experts.

So has Obama's fraud been exposed by real experts.

News anchors regurgitating a script they are handed, often compiled by the government with much to hide, can't be trusted.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1393168
United States
05/21/2011 04:48 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
well, I guess its some guy with a camcorder vs. a well established journalist source like Popular Mechanics.

There is no way the truth could be uncovered by some guy with a camcorder.

After all its an established fact that only the well established Pope knows Gods will. And only the well established authorized King James version of 1611 can be used if you want to really read "the" Bible.

The people are nothing and the President is everything. Whatever the President says must be truth, no need to listen to the voice of the people.

The authorities and the well established have the inside track to truth and reality.

lol

popular mechanics

lol..

i guess that's good enough for mainstream media and the general public

a magazine..
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1391506


So let me get this straight. Some guy with a camcorder who was PAID to make a 9/11 conspiracy movie because he couldn't get funding for the movie he wanted to make is a reliable source... but a well established journalistic news source that demands hard facts and actual expert sources (instead of conspiracy wack jobs doing home made 'experiments' in their back yards) is not reputable.

Have you ever considered making a longterm investment in your future by purchasing toll rights to bridges?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1393168

 Quoting: all_the_kings_horses 1346228


It is hilarious to me, as someone who is naturally suspicious of the government and an atheist, that you think because I'm not a truther I must be a blind patriotic redneck religious nut.

So I have one question. If the government is willing to murder 3000+ people for a pretense to go to war with Iraq for oil (even though Iraq today sells almost all of its oil to China, an arrangement that was put in place when Bush was still in office, but that is another discussion) then why wouldn't this same murdering government hunt down some guy no one has ever heard of, who is uncovering their dirty little secret, and just take him out, too? I mean seriously. If the government really would do that then how the hell is Dylan Avery still alive? Why wasn't he killed before the video was ever released.

And for that matter, why not use fake hackers and DDOS attacks to just just keeps websites like this one from discussing this if they want to keep it secret? Why not do everything they kind to squash it? If China can have the Great Firewall surely we could have done the same after 9/11 on the pretense of safety. Just throw in an extra provision in the Patriot Act. So they're willing to kill 3000 people but they draw the moral line at one lone guy or a few conspiracy websites?

It just doesn't stand up to basic reasoning. But the real problem with conspiracy theories like this are that they distract from the REAL evils of our government. Such as the aforementioned Patriot Act. Hmmm, if I was a conspiracy theorist I might theorize that Loose Change and the Truther movement was a small part of a larger PsyOp distraction used to keep us from realizing that our government is eroding our freedoms.

But who would believe that?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1393345
India
05/21/2011 04:51 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: CNN: 11 political myths and conspiracy theories that still persist, they claim JFK, 9/11 and Obama birther therories have all been debunked.
laugh

lol

popular mechanics

lol..

i guess that's good enough for mainstream media and the general public

a magazine..
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1391506

News