Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 2,429 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 1,585,172
Pageviews Today: 2,258,437Threads Today: 575Posts Today: 12,532
07:30 PM


Back to Forum
Back to Forum
Back to Thread
Back to Thread
REPORT ABUSIVE REPLY
Message Subject *** Fukushima *** and other nuclear-----updates and links
Poster Handle Anonymous Coward
Post Content
Nuclear fears contaminate sales for Japan farmers

In the aftermath of the disaster, the legal limit for radioactive caesium in Japanese foods was raised in line with international emergency procedures before returning to normal in April last year.

This return to "normal" should have reassured consumers, but the stigma has lingered from temporary bans imposed on beef, milk, mushrooms, vegetables and rice from Fukushima prefecture after they were found to contain levels of radioactive caesium above government safety limits.

---

"A total of 45 countries and areas restricted food imports from Japan following the nuclear plant accident, resulting in declines in shipments," a ministry official said. "Generally, they are easing the curbs except for South Korea."

In the town of Soma, 40 kilometres from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, locally grown rice is often up to scratch but only locals want to buy it.

Masahiro Saito, a chicken farmer who has seen a 20 percent loss in his turnover, feels less unlucky than his cereal and vegetable-growing neighbours, some of whom have had to pack up for good.

"At the peak of the radiation in March 2011, I recorded 5 becquerels of radioactive caesium per kilogramme on my chickens," said Saito—well below the government limit. Like most of his counterparts, he has raised his animals on American corn, which explains why he and other farmers have suffered less than others in the region.

But the consequences of the nuclear accident are still being felt two years later on on the overall economy, not just agriculture, and on the daily lives of hundreds of thousands of people in the region.

The clean-up around Fukushima is expected to take decades and experts warn that some settlements may have to be abandoned. Anecdotally, the pressures are mounting and stories of people whose livelihoods have dried up abound in the Japanese press.

The Cabinet Office says up until last November 76 people in the region took their own lives in connection with the disaster.

Of the deaths, 21 were linked to financial and livelihood issues and nine to employment issues, the government said.


Read more at: [link to phys.org]
 
Please verify you're human:




Reason for reporting:



News








Proud Member Of The Angry Mob