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Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault

 
Anonymous Coward
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07/23/2011 01:42 AM
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Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
The last time it happened on this scale was in 1811 and 1812 when the New Madrid Fault ripped open.

BTW, we are coming up on the 200 year anniversary in December and scientists have been saying a big quake happens every 200 years on the New Madrid.

We got a month or less until the Big One hits according to the following site.
-----------------

Panther Across The Sky
Tecumseh And The New Madrid Earthquake
[link to www.ratical.com]

Saturday, November 16, 1811

Under a crisp cloudless sky, the Indians crouched. No fires had been lighted, lest this drive away or interfere with the sign. There was no moon this night, and the stars twinkled with almost tangible brightness in their deep black background. With blankets held over their heads to hold back the bite of the cold air, the Indians waited. In southern Canada, from the great falls of the Niagara to the great Lake-of-the-Woods, they watched. In western New York and Pennsylvania, they watched. In Ohio and the Indiana Territory and in the land that pushed north between the two great lakes and in the land to the west of the lakes, they watched. Along the Mississippi and Missouri, and even farther west, they watched. In the Tennessee and Alabama and Mississippi country, they watched. And the principal chief of each tribe held in his hand the final red stick of his bundle.

Just before the midpoint of the night it came -- a great searing flash from out of the southwest; incredibly bright with a weird greenish-white light, incredibly swift, incredibly awe-inspiring. And the heads of a thousand, ten thousand, a hundred thousand Indians swiveled to watch its fiery progress across the heavens until it disappeared in the northeast. And they were deeply moved by it.


Many of the chiefs broke their sticks over their knees and threw them away and rid their fear in anger. But there were some who retired to their wegiwas or teepees or hogans, lay the red stick upon the ground before the fire, and carefully measured, marked it off with a bit of charcoal, and cut it into thirty equal lengths.

And then they waited.


Monday, December 16, 1811

At 2:30 A.M. the earth shook.

In the south of Canada, in the villages of the Iroquois, Ottawa, Chippewa and Huron, it came as a deep and terrifying rumble. Creek banks caved in and huge trees toppled in a continuous crash of snapping branches.

In all of the Great Lakes, but especially Lake Michigan and Lake Erie, the waters danced and great waves broke erratically on the shores, though there was no wind.

In the western plains, there was a fierce grinding sound and a shuddering, which jarred the bones and set teeth on edge. Earthen vessels split apart and great herds of bison staggered to their feet and stampeded in abject panic.

To the south and west, tremendous boulders broke loose on hills and cut swaths through the trees and brush to the bottoms. Rapidly running streams stopped and eddied, and some of them abruptly went dry and the fish that had lived in them flopped away their lives on the muddy or rocky beds.

To the south, whole forests fell in incredible tangles. New streams sprang up where none had been before. In the Upper Creek village of Tuckabatchee, every dwelling shuddered and shook, and then collapsed upon itself and its inhabitants.

To the south and east, palm trees lashed about like whips, and lakes emptied of their waters, while ponds appeared in huge declivities which suddenly dented the surface of the earth.

All over the land, birds were roused from their roosting places with scream of fright and flapping wings. Cattle bellowed and kicked, lost their footing, and were thrown to the ground where they rolled about, unable to regain their balance.

In Kentucky, Tennessee and the Indiana Territory, settlers were thrown from their beds, heard the timbers of their cabins wrench apart, and watched the bricks crumble into heaps of debris masked in choking clouds of dust. Bridges snapped and tumbled into rivers and creeks. Glass shattered, fences and barns collapsed and fires broke out. Along steep ravines, the cliffside slipped and filled their chasms, and the country was blanketing with a deafening roar.

In the center of all this, in that area where the Ohio River meets the Mississippi, where Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, Missouri, and Illinois come together, fantastic splits appeared in the ground and huge tracts of land were swallowed up. A few miles from the Mississippi, near the Kentucky-Tennessee border, a monstrous section of ground sank as if some gigantic foot had stepped on the soft earth and mashed it down. Water gushed forth in fantastic volume and the depression became filled and turned into a large lake, to become known as Reelfoot Lake. The whole midsection of the Mississippi writhed and heaved and tremendous bluffs toppled into the muddy waters. Entire sections of land were inundated, and others that had been riverbed were left high in the air. The Mississippi itself turned and flowed backwards for a time. It swirled and eddied, hissed and gurgled, and at length, when it settled down, the face of the land had changed. New Madrid was destroyed and the tens of thousands of acres of land, including virtually all that was owned by Simon Kenton, vanished forever; that which remained was ugly and austere.

Such was the great sign of Tecumseh.

This was the earthquake which occurred where no tremor had ever been recorded before; where there was no scientific explanation for such a thing happening; where no one cold possibly have anticipated or predicted that an earthquake could happen. No one except Tecumseh.
Anonymous Coward
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07/23/2011 01:53 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Thanks for the info. I've been in Chicago over 30 years and have NEVER seen the sky like this. I called my Mom to tell her to check it out, which I never do.

It was incredible looking.

BUT I hope you are wrong about the big one.
Anonymous Coward
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07/23/2011 01:56 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
BUT I hope you are wrong about the big one.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1462494


That's what she said! rockon
Anonymous Coward
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07/23/2011 01:57 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
It seems to me that the whole North American Continent is under tremendous pressure from the Pacific Plate pushing against the North American Plate. We can already assume that there will be a big quake along the west coast of our continent. The reason why I say there is huge pressure against our continent is because people all over the United States, and even in Canada have been hearing low rumbling sounds coming from deep in the earth, especially in California and Oregon. So since this pressure is building up I would assume that it is affecting the New Madrid Fault also.
Anonymous Coward
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07/23/2011 01:59 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
I forgot to say that the pressure against our continent is caused by the earthquake in Japan, pushing the Pacific Plate eight feet closer to North America.
General Troll, US Shillitary

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07/23/2011 02:00 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Lightening has been more intense than I ever remember. Both in frequency and intensity.

ohno
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
Anonymous Coward
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07/23/2011 02:00 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
I'm in TN and was outside from about 6pm until about an hour ago and saw nothing as far as heat lightning. Did see 2 shooting stars this evening in the southern sky, though.
Anonymous Coward
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07/23/2011 02:01 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Lightening has been more intense than I ever remember. Both in frequency and intensity.

ohno
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


Same here, it turned on my metal detector after it hit pretty damn close to my garage...never seen lightning turn on electronics before.
iknownothingseriously​

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07/23/2011 02:17 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
clappa

well done op...this is interesting. i hope you end up wrong, for obvious reasons, but the lightning tonight is just eerie.

what do you think the flash of green light was that the indians saw?
I tried being normal. I didn't like it~
Anonymous Coward
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07/23/2011 08:09 PM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
clappa

well done op...this is interesting. i hope you end up wrong, for obvious reasons, but the lightning tonight is just eerie.

what do you think the flash of green light was that the indians saw?
 Quoting: iknownothingseriously


I think it's just another thing to add to the long list of things we havent ever seen before, that keep cropping up everywhere.
Tecniqs

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08/25/2011 02:34 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
bumpbumpbump
Anonymous Coward
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08/25/2011 02:36 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Here's something weird. I am in Austin TX. We are in a drought - have not had rain, and no rain is forecast. Tonight, I was out with my kids, and there was lightning. I did not see any clouds, but there was lightening. Could it be related?
Anonymous Coward
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08/25/2011 02:39 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Here's something weird. I am in Austin TX. We are in a drought - have not had rain, and no rain is forecast. Tonight, I was out with my kids, and there was lightning. I did not see any clouds, but there was lightening. Could it be related?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1486833


whoa
Anonymous Coward
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08/25/2011 02:50 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
bump
tranny witch

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08/25/2011 02:59 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Didn't the prophecy come from Tecumseh's brother whose name was Prophet?

Tecumseh was a great leader. Were it not for the actions of his tribal militias, in crucial battles of the war of 1812, we would all be speaking American.
2011 may be your last chance for panic sex with a she-male
Anonymous Coward
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08/25/2011 03:23 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
What part of IL is this happening? I'm just past Chicago, it's 2:24AM, did I miss it? There's no clouds here....
Anonymous Coward
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08/25/2011 03:29 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Here's something weird. I am in Austin TX. We are in a drought - have not had rain, and no rain is forecast. Tonight, I was out with my kids, and there was lightning. I did not see any clouds, but there was lightening. Could it be related?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1486833


whoa
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1450913


Just double checked the radar to make sure there was not a storm system to the south or east of us that I was not aware of. It does not appear to be so. Here is a link to radar maps:

[link to houston.justweather.com]

They had storms and lightening in Houston, but that's 300 miles away.
Anonymous Coward
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08/25/2011 03:32 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
bsflag
EQ Maker

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08/25/2011 03:42 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
This is the radar to use...

[link to www.intellicast.com]
goodmockingbird
In the Heart of the EF 5 Tornado Belt

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08/25/2011 03:59 AM

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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Didn't the prophecy come from Tecumseh's brother whose name was Prophet?

Tecumseh was a great leader. Were it not for the actions of his tribal militias, in crucial battles of the war of 1812, we would all be speaking American.
 Quoting: tranny witch


The brother was named Tenskwatawa, who was known as a mystic, a prophet, and a drunkard.

Tecumseh attempted to unite all of the eastern tribes against Euro-American encroachment.

Tenskwatawa, his brother, led a mystical movement to turn away from European culture and technology, and to return to traditional lifestyle.
In Memory of Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty: American Heroes, Abandoned and Betrayed.
Rhyme King
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12/13/2011 10:48 PM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
I know this subject is months old but I do remember that night
when the weather was clear here, I'm from Owensboro, KY, about
two to three hours away northeast of the New Madrid Fault and this was over this summer. I saw a flash of light to my southwest, so something is up apparently, I somehow figured that those could be earthquake lights too.
YOUCITY23
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01/10/2012 02:42 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
The last time it happened on this scale was in 1811 and 1812 when the New Madrid Fault ripped open.

BTW, we are coming up on the 200 year anniversary in December and scientists have been saying a big quake happens every 200 years on the New Madrid.

We got a month or less until the Big One hits according to the following site.
-----------------

Panther Across The Sky
Tecumseh And The New Madrid Earthquake
[link to www.ratical.com]

Saturday, November 16, 1811

Under a crisp cloudless sky, the Indians crouched. No fires had been lighted, lest this drive away or interfere with the sign. There was no moon this night, and the stars twinkled with almost tangible brightness in their deep black background. With blankets held over their heads to hold back the bite of the cold air, the Indians waited. In southern Canada, from the great falls of the Niagara to the great Lake-of-the-Woods, they watched. In western New York and Pennsylvania, they watched. In Ohio and the Indiana Territory and in the land that pushed north between the two great lakes and in the land to the west of the lakes, they watched. Along the Mississippi and Missouri, and even farther west, they watched. In the Tennessee and Alabama and Mississippi country, they watched. And the principal chief of each tribe held in his hand the final red stick of his bundle.

Just before the midpoint of the night it came -- a great searing flash from out of the southwest; incredibly bright with a weird greenish-white light, incredibly swift, incredibly awe-inspiring. And the heads of a thousand, ten thousand, a hundred thousand Indians swiveled to watch its fiery progress across the heavens until it disappeared in the northeast. And they were deeply moved by it.


Many of the chiefs broke their sticks over their knees and threw them away and rid their fear in anger. But there were some who retired to their wegiwas or teepees or hogans, lay the red stick upon the ground before the fire, and carefully measured, marked it off with a bit of charcoal, and cut it into thirty equal lengths.

And then they waited.


Monday, December 16, 1811

At 2:30 A.M. the earth shook.

In the south of Canada, in the villages of the Iroquois, Ottawa, Chippewa and Huron, it came as a deep and terrifying rumble. Creek banks caved in and huge trees toppled in a continuous crash of snapping branches.

In all of the Great Lakes, but especially Lake Michigan and Lake Erie, the waters danced and great waves broke erratically on the shores, though there was no wind.

In the western plains, there was a fierce grinding sound and a shuddering, which jarred the bones and set teeth on edge. Earthen vessels split apart and great herds of bison staggered to their feet and stampeded in abject panic.

To the south and west, tremendous boulders broke loose on hills and cut swaths through the trees and brush to the bottoms. Rapidly running streams stopped and eddied, and some of them abruptly went dry and the fish that had lived in them flopped away their lives on the muddy or rocky beds.

To the south, whole forests fell in incredible tangles. New streams sprang up where none had been before. In the Upper Creek village of Tuckabatchee, every dwelling shuddered and shook, and then collapsed upon itself and its inhabitants.

To the south and east, palm trees lashed about like whips, and lakes emptied of their waters, while ponds appeared in huge declivities which suddenly dented the surface of the earth.

All over the land, birds were roused from their roosting places with scream of fright and flapping wings. Cattle bellowed and kicked, lost their footing, and were thrown to the ground where they rolled about, unable to regain their balance.

In Kentucky, Tennessee and the Indiana Territory, settlers were thrown from their beds, heard the timbers of their cabins wrench apart, and watched the bricks crumble into heaps of debris masked in choking clouds of dust. Bridges snapped and tumbled into rivers and creeks. Glass shattered, fences and barns collapsed and fires broke out. Along steep ravines, the cliffside slipped and filled their chasms, and the country was blanketing with a deafening roar.

In the center of all this, in that area where the Ohio River meets the Mississippi, where Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, Missouri, and Illinois come together, fantastic splits appeared in the ground and huge tracts of land were swallowed up. A few miles from the Mississippi, near the Kentucky-Tennessee border, a monstrous section of ground sank as if some gigantic foot had stepped on the soft earth and mashed it down. Water gushed forth in fantastic volume and the depression became filled and turned into a large lake, to become known as Reelfoot Lake. The whole midsection of the Mississippi writhed and heaved and tremendous bluffs toppled into the muddy waters. Entire sections of land were inundated, and others that had been riverbed were left high in the air. The Mississippi itself turned and flowed backwards for a time. It swirled and eddied, hissed and gurgled, and at length, when it settled down, the face of the land had changed. New Madrid was destroyed and the tens of thousands of acres of land, including virtually all that was owned by Simon Kenton, vanished forever; that which remained was ugly and austere.

Such was the great sign of Tecumseh.

This was the earthquake which occurred where no tremor had ever been recorded before; where there was no scientific explanation for such a thing happening; where no one cold possibly have anticipated or predicted that an earthquake could happen. No one except Tecumseh.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1247737


WTF! I've seen this object! I live in St.louis. I've also been reading EAT's thread about a dream he had of an earthquake in niagra Missouri. As if things haven't been strange enough it seems to be getting even stranger.
bump
YOUCITY23
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01/10/2012 02:54 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
The last time it happened on this scale was in 1811 and 1812 when the New Madrid Fault ripped open.

BTW, we are coming up on the 200 year anniversary in December and scientists have been saying a big quake happens every 200 years on the New Madrid.

We got a month or less until the Big One hits according to the following site.
-----------------

Panther Across The Sky
Tecumseh And The New Madrid Earthquake
[link to www.ratical.com]

Saturday, November 16, 1811

Under a crisp cloudless sky, the Indians crouched. No fires had been lighted, lest this drive away or interfere with the sign. There was no moon this night, and the stars twinkled with almost tangible brightness in their deep black background. With blankets held over their heads to hold back the bite of the cold air, the Indians waited. In southern Canada, from the great falls of the Niagara to the great Lake-of-the-Woods, they watched. In western New York and Pennsylvania, they watched. In Ohio and the Indiana Territory and in the land that pushed north between the two great lakes and in the land to the west of the lakes, they watched. Along the Mississippi and Missouri, and even farther west, they watched. In the Tennessee and Alabama and Mississippi country, they watched. And the principal chief of each tribe held in his hand the final red stick of his bundle.

Just before the midpoint of the night it came -- a great searing flash from out of the southwest; incredibly bright with a weird greenish-white light, incredibly swift, incredibly awe-inspiring. And the heads of a thousand, ten thousand, a hundred thousand Indians swiveled to watch its fiery progress across the heavens until it disappeared in the northeast. And they were deeply moved by it.


Many of the chiefs broke their sticks over their knees and threw them away and rid their fear in anger. But there were some who retired to their wegiwas or teepees or hogans, lay the red stick upon the ground before the fire, and carefully measured, marked it off with a bit of charcoal, and cut it into thirty equal lengths.

And then they waited.


Monday, December 16, 1811

At 2:30 A.M. the earth shook.

In the south of Canada, in the villages of the Iroquois, Ottawa, Chippewa and Huron, it came as a deep and terrifying rumble. Creek banks caved in and huge trees toppled in a continuous crash of snapping branches.

In all of the Great Lakes, but especially Lake Michigan and Lake Erie, the waters danced and great waves broke erratically on the shores, though there was no wind.

In the western plains, there was a fierce grinding sound and a shuddering, which jarred the bones and set teeth on edge. Earthen vessels split apart and great herds of bison staggered to their feet and stampeded in abject panic.

To the south and west, tremendous boulders broke loose on hills and cut swaths through the trees and brush to the bottoms. Rapidly running streams stopped and eddied, and some of them abruptly went dry and the fish that had lived in them flopped away their lives on the muddy or rocky beds.

To the south, whole forests fell in incredible tangles. New streams sprang up where none had been before. In the Upper Creek village of Tuckabatchee, every dwelling shuddered and shook, and then collapsed upon itself and its inhabitants.

To the south and east, palm trees lashed about like whips, and lakes emptied of their waters, while ponds appeared in huge declivities which suddenly dented the surface of the earth.

All over the land, birds were roused from their roosting places with scream of fright and flapping wings. Cattle bellowed and kicked, lost their footing, and were thrown to the ground where they rolled about, unable to regain their balance.

In Kentucky, Tennessee and the Indiana Territory, settlers were thrown from their beds, heard the timbers of their cabins wrench apart, and watched the bricks crumble into heaps of debris masked in choking clouds of dust. Bridges snapped and tumbled into rivers and creeks. Glass shattered, fences and barns collapsed and fires broke out. Along steep ravines, the cliffside slipped and filled their chasms, and the country was blanketing with a deafening roar.

In the center of all this, in that area where the Ohio River meets the Mississippi, where Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, Missouri, and Illinois come together, fantastic splits appeared in the ground and huge tracts of land were swallowed up. A few miles from the Mississippi, near the Kentucky-Tennessee border, a monstrous section of ground sank as if some gigantic foot had stepped on the soft earth and mashed it down. Water gushed forth in fantastic volume and the depression became filled and turned into a large lake, to become known as Reelfoot Lake. The whole midsection of the Mississippi writhed and heaved and tremendous bluffs toppled into the muddy waters. Entire sections of land were inundated, and others that had been riverbed were left high in the air. The Mississippi itself turned and flowed backwards for a time. It swirled and eddied, hissed and gurgled, and at length, when it settled down, the face of the land had changed. New Madrid was destroyed and the tens of thousands of acres of land, including virtually all that was owned by Simon Kenton, vanished forever; that which remained was ugly and austere.

Such was the great sign of Tecumseh.

This was the earthquake which occurred where no tremor had ever been recorded before; where there was no scientific explanation for such a thing happening; where no one cold possibly have anticipated or predicted that an earthquake could happen. No one except Tecumseh.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1247737


This was posted on July 23 , see this is the shit I've been talking about.
YOUCITY
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01/10/2012 02:57 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
Didn't the prophecy come from Tecumseh's brother whose name was Prophet?

Tecumseh was a great leader. Were it not for the actions of his tribal militias, in crucial battles of the war of 1812, we would all be speaking American.
 Quoting: tranny witch


The brother was named Tenskwatawa, who was known as a mystic, a prophet, and a drunkard.

Tecumseh attempted to unite all of the eastern tribes against Euro-American encroachment.

Tenskwatawa, his brother, led a mystical movement to turn away from European culture and technology, and to return to traditional lifestyle.
 Quoting: goodmockingbird


Did Tecumseh have bad intentions? I'm actually confused about either of the brothers intentions but very interested. I'm gonna look into it but I'd like to hear more.
Anonymous Coward
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01/10/2012 03:07 AM
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Re: Flickering light in sky across Midwest = Earthquake Light From New Madrid Fault
it will be in oklahoma. very soon.look at usgs.the signs are there.