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Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas

 
Nine's

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 06:19 AM
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Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
There have been some good threads about storage food, the need for preparation, where to buy, etc. but not many threads about using the food you store.

I've been going through my recipes and have some old, some recent, and many inexpensive.

Cooking at home is usually cheaper and healthier than eating out. If you have any you'd like to share, please post them.

There may be some hard times coming and the more people can do now, the better they'll fare later.

If you have inexpensive recipes, even if they aren't directly related to storage items, please post them. Many seem to be having hard times now and might appreciate your help.Food storage tips are also welcome.

Rice seems to be mentioned a lot. Rice and beans. Sounds like a good place to start.


Most recipes can be easily modified for your taste, preference, or what you have on hand.

The first recipe, I don't use the celery, onions, or carrots, but I add mushrooms and a few frozen peas for color.

Instead of cooking it in the oven, I brown the rice, add liquid, and cook on top of the stove, adding the mushrooms and peas when it's nearly done.



Rice Pilaf

2 c rice
4 T butter or margarine
4 c liquid (chicken broth if served with fowl; beef broth if served with beef)
1 c slivered almonds
3/4 c chopped celery
3/4 c chopped green onions
3/4 c chopped carrots
Salt and pepper to taste


Brown rice lightly with butter in skillet. Place in casserole with boiling broth. Cover and bake one half hour at 375 degrees. Take from oven and add vegetables and nuts, stirring and mixing well with fork. Return to oven for one half hour. Makes 8 servings.
Nine's (OP)

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08/02/2011 06:28 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Fried rice can be used with any meat, or no meat at all. Leftover pork chops, even picking the meat from the bone, offers enough for fried rice and makes a great meal.

The following recipe is a basic, that can be modified in many ways.

I lightly sautee the onions and mushrooms,and add to the rice. Then beat the eggs, let them run over the pan in a thin layer, fry them in butter or olive oil, then slice thinly or chop, to add to the rice.

Once added to the rice, stir fry everything, adding soy sauce near the end.


Fried Rice

3 c cooked rice
3 strip bacon, chopped fine
3 eggs, slightly beaten
1 1/4 c cooked meat, diced fine
2 T green onions, minced
1/2 c sliced mushrooms, sauteed
2 T soy sauce




I also modify this recipe. The lentils I cook in broth, and don't add the chili powder, cumin, oregano, or cheese. Using different spices makes a completely different taste, and makes it not so tiring if you need to serve it repeatedly.

Lentils and Rice
1/2 c. brown rice (white may be used)
3/4 c. lentils, cleaned
2 and 3/4 c. water
1/2 chopped onions
1/2 tsp. garlic salt
2 beef bouillon cubes
2 to 3 tsp. chili powder
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1/2 tsp. dried crushed oregano

grated cheddar cheese

Put rice, rinsed lentils and water in a pot. Bring to rolling boil; reduce heat to lowest, cover. Allow to simmer for 45 minutes or until tender (add more water towards the end of this cooking time if the rice isn't quite done). Add chopped onions, garlic salt, chili powder, cumin, oregano. Cover; cook on low about 15 more minutes, or until onions are tender. Take off heat, keep covered a bit longer. To serve: place hot from the pan into a shallow bowl, immediately top with grated cheese.
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 06:33 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Black Bean and Ramen Salad
4 Servings
1 package ramen noodles
1 ½ cups black beans, or other cooked beans
1 red and yellow bell pepper, cut in strips
¼ onion, sliced
2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon oil
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

Remove flavor packet from ramen noodles.
Partially break noodles and cook according to
package directions. Drain, rinse with cold water
and drain again. Combine noodles with beans,
peppers, onion, and cilantro. Combine vinegar, oil,and mustard with flavor packet from noodles.
Shake well. Pour over salad and toss to mix.





Pinto Beans
2 qts. dry beans
Sort dry beans, rinse, place in bowl and cover with water + 3 inches and 2 T. salt. Let soak overnight.
1 large yellow onion - diced
2 T. salt
2 t. garlic
1 t. beef bullion
1/4 t. liquid smoke (optional)
½ t. pepper

In the morning drain and rinse well. Pour into large pan or 8 qt. crock pot, cover with water + 1 inch. Add diced onion and cook on high for 6 hrs. Add seasonings and cook until soft. Leftovers may be frozen.

Cornbread goes well with pinto beans. A little dab of chow chow or your favorite relish adds a lot of flavor, as do chopped onions.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1490939
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08/02/2011 06:42 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Just got a copy of "Apocalypse Chow", a half-serious attempt at a gourmet cookbook using preps. Lots of fun.

Last night I was looking at storage lists and noticed a recipes page for one of the sites.

[link to www.grandpappy.info]
EleKtroN

User ID: 1491201
United States
08/02/2011 06:42 AM

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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
bump
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 06:43 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Corn and Bean Pone

Grind ½ cup of whole corn and ½ cup of pinto beans to the consistency of flour, combine in a bowl mixing well, add one teaspoon of salt and gradually add ¾ cup of boiling water. Melt enough lard to cover the bottom of the pan with a thin layer of grease, after the pan is greased, pour the mixture into the pan and blend with the grease.

If you want it to rise, add 2 teaspoons of baking powder.

Either fry on stove top or bake at 350 til done.


White Beans
2 TBSP Oil
1 1/2 TBSP Onions, dried or fresh
1-2 TBSP Sugar
4 cups cooked beans (great northern or navy beans)
1/3 cup water
2 TBSP Butter
2 TBSP Whole Wheat Flour
2 cups Milk
1/2 tsp salt (to taste)
1/8 tsp pepper (to taste)


Over medium heat, saute onions in oil.
Add sugar, beans, and water.
In a separate saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Add milk and flour and stir until thick. Add to beans.
Add salt and pepper and adjust seasonings as needed. Gently simmer for several minutes to blend flavors.

Some people like to add rosemary, thyme, savory, or basil. If you use them, add them near the end of cooking.

If the beans are cooked with a ham hock, they will have a rich, meaty flavor. The bits of ham add some color. If you don't have a ham hock, using ham base that comes in a jar, gives the same flavor, without the meat.

The recipe can be used with canned beans if you are in a hurry or don't feel like cooking dried beans.
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 06:56 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Beans and Rice
2 TBSP Olive Oil
2 garlic cloves, minced (1 tsp prepared minced garlic)
1/2 cup fresh cilantro or about 1 TBSP dry cilantro
1/2 green pepper, chopped very fine.
1 8 oz can tomato sauce
2 cups black or red beans, pre-cooked (1 can)
2 cups brown rice, steamed in chicken broth (can substitute 2 cubes bouillon)

1. In a large frying pan, heat oil. Saute garlic, cilantro and green pepper.

2. Add tomato sauce and beans. Heat through and allow to simmer for about five minutes.

3. Serve over rice.

Any of the spices can be eliminated or substituted.


So much can be done with beans. They're nourishing, inexpensive, and make a complete protein when combined with a grain, such as corn or wheat. They can be a main dish, a soup, added to bread, mashed and mixed with mayo or ranch dressing for a chip dip, mashed and added to meatloaf or to thicken soups.

People could save an enormous amount of money by using beans once or twice a week. Leftover beans from the night before, are good in a soft tortilla, topped with onion, tomato, cheese, lettuce, or whatever you think sounds good.

Often, people store beans with no idea of how to use them before they get hard. It's as important to get your body accustomed to them, as it is to use them before they grow hard.

A tip for softening hard beans is to cook them, then freeze them. Freezing helps rupture the cell wall and helps to soften them.

Pressure cooking is another way of softening them. Not much can survive being tough or hard in a pressure cooker.

Some bagged beans are cleaner than others. All beans should be washed to remove bits of gravel, dirt,and other material. During soaking, shriveled beans float to the top and can be easily removed. Running your hands over and through the beans shows any bad ones that should be picked out.
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 07:02 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Just got a copy of "Apocalypse Chow", a half-serious attempt at a gourmet cookbook using preps. Lots of fun.

Last night I was looking at storage lists and noticed a recipes page for one of the sites.

[link to www.grandpappy.info]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1490939


Yes, that's a very good site. Offers so much useful and inexpensive information. Thanks for posting it.

A nice link that has documents such as the quantity and cost for a years supply of food, recipes in a google docs format that can be printed. They have no copyright with the exception of he gluten-free storage list and steam juicer recipes and she encourages people to share freely.
[link to www.theprovidenthomemaker.com]


Clicking the link to "favorite resources," will take you to a page on home storage and organization, many food storage links, as well as emergency preparedness, self reliance, cooking and recipes, preserving food and much, much more. It's such a good link that I'll post it in case you miss it.
[link to www.theprovidenthomemaker.com]

Many thanks to the Provident Homemaker
Nine's (OP)

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08/02/2011 07:03 AM
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bump
 Quoting: EleKtroN


Thank you!

Have to go now but will be back later with more. Feel free to add to the list.
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 09:34 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Mormon Baked Beans

2 c. small white beans
6 c. water
2 T. dehydrated onio
1/4 c. oil
1/4 c. brown sugar
3 T. honey
1/4 t. dry mustard
1 1/2 t. salt
1/8 t. pepper
1/2 c. bacon or bacon bits

Soak beans overnight.

Simmer over low heat 1-2 hrs. or until tender.Drain, reserving
liquid.

Add onions to beans and put in a 2 qt. casserole dish.

Stir together oil, sugar, honey, mustard, salt, pepper and 1 cup of reserved liquid. pour over beans and stir gently.

Add enough of remaining liquid to almost cover beans. Bake at 350 for 3-4 hours. Stir in bacon or bacon bit in last 30 minutes.

These can also be cooked in a crock pot.



Rice Dinner

1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 T. cornstarch
1 t. onion powder
1 can tuna or chicken

Cook celery and onion in 3 1/2 cups water. Add soup.

Combine cornstarch with 1/4 cup cold water.Add to the soup mixture along with the onion powder and tuna or chicken.

Serve over rice.



CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP

1 Cup Navy Bean Flour
4 Cups Water or Milk
1 Tablespoon Chicken Bouillon
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1/4 cup dehydrated onions or 1 small onion optional

Grind the dry beans in a wheat grinder. Usually, 3/4 cup of beans will make 1 cup of flour.

Add the other dry ingredients to the bean flour.

Stir 1/2 cup of water or milk into the bean flour until it is mixed then add the rest of the water or milk and heat it in a medium sized sauce pan, constantly stirring.

As it reaches the boiling point it will thicken. Boil it for about a minute. If it gets too thick add a bit more water/milk until your soup thins down to what cream of chicken soup should be.

If it lacks flavor, add a bit more chicken bouillon. Garnish with dry parsley flakes.

Serves 4.




Instant Bean Soup

Use 2 T. white bean flour per cup of liquid for thin soups, 3 T. for medium-thick and 4-5 T. for
thick soups, stews or gravies. Whisk into soup stock or boiling water with 1 t. bouillon or soup base per
cup. Cook 3-5 minutes.



Rice Pudding

1/2 pound long grain white rice, cooked
1 quart milk
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon butter
1/4 cup milk

Add the milk to the warm rice, mix thoroughly.

Mix cinnamon with sugar and add to rice. Mix well.

Melt teaspoon of butter, add 1/4 cup milk. Heat but do not boil.

Place rice mixture in an oven safe dish and pour butter-milk mixture on top.

Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes or until browned.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1337468
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08/02/2011 11:07 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Great Resource, great fun.

[link to everydayfoodstorage.net]
Nine's (OP)

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08/02/2011 05:39 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Great Resource, great fun.

[link to everydayfoodstorage.net]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1337468


Very nice! There's an section of recipes all categorized. Thank you!
Nine's (OP)

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08/02/2011 05:52 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Bread is called the staff of life. It's been the staple food for many cultures and for generations. It can be made from any grain. It's economical, filling, can be nutritious, and is as good plain, with butter or jam, as it is with a meal.

Most people keep grains in their storage. Some with no idea what to do with it. Others with the idea of putting some wheat berries in a thermos and letting them make an excellent breakfast cereal.

Those who aren't accustomed to wheat may have a rude awakening. It takes a while for your system to accept the change from white processed bread to wheat bread.

Some have, or will have, allergies to wheat. Many now have allergies and it will be interesting to see if those allergies leave when/if the times comes when processed foods and additives are no longer in the diet.

Bread is often mistakenly seen as a time consuming, technical operation with high risk of failure. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Knowing the basics of bread will make your experience rewarding, rather than frustrating.

Bread can be made with only four ingredients. Yeast, flour, water, and salt. Any additional ingredients are there for flavor, color, nutrition, or texture.

After you've been baking a while, you may find yourself putting together your own recipes and finding them better than the ones you began with.

If you aren't making a flatbread, bread needs something to make it rise. It can be yeast or baking soda and baking powder.

Yeast is a live fungus that lies dormant until it comes in contact with warm water. Once reactivated, it feeds on the sugars in the flour, or sugar you've added. It creates carbon dioxide which makes the bread rise. Water that is too hot, or adding too much sugar can inhibit the yeast growth. Yeast is what provides the bread aroma that anyone loves waking to on a cold winter morning.

Baking powder or baking soda work faster than yeast and is usually used for what is called quick breads. They usually require no kneading and can go directly from the mixing bowl to the oven.

Flour provides the structure for your bread. In yeast breads we want a lot of gluten. In addition to helping the rising, it gives bread it's structure. Usually 5 lb. bags of flour have far less gluten content than 25 lb. bags. If using flour processed into small packages, your bread will be more rewardingif you add some gluten. Directions on the can will tell you how much to add.

Some recipes call for multiple risings. Let it rise, punch down, rise again, knead again, etc. Wheat bread needs more kneading than white bread. The purpose of the multiple risings is allowing the gluten to develop more completely and to add more flavor. When in a hurry, adding some gluten can eliminate the extra risings.

Salt strengthens gluten and enhances flavor. It moderates the effect of yeast so the bread doesn't rise too quickly. The liquid reacts with the starch in the protein and builds a strong, but light structure while it adds steam to the baking. The steam expands and makes the bread rise.

A tip for any bread is to have a pan of hot water beneath the bread in the oven as it bakes.It softens the crust and makes a much nicer loaf.

Knowing the basics of what the ingredients do, can help you figure what went wrong if your bread doesn't turn out the way you hoped.


Though bread can be made with only those four ingredients, adding other ingredients greatly improves the bread. Oil or butter makes the bread softer and curiously, makes the bread last longer. Wheat bread, which usually has a small amount of white flour added to the wheat to make it lighter, would be heavy as a brick with a very coarse texture without white flour or oil.

Additional ingredients are added for nutrition. Anything from peanut butter, sprouts, vegetables, fruits, to nuts.

There is no reason for anyone to say baking bread it too hard. Some day you might wish you'd learned.

A very easy beginner bread will be the first one. It has a soft crust, moist center, and the ingredients are probably, or should be, already in your kitchen.

Basic 1 loaf bread

3/4 cup warm water
1 package active dry yeast
1 tsp salt
1-1/2 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp vegetable shortening, olive oil, or butter
1/2 cup warm milk
3 cups all-purpose flour, approximately

In large bowl, add the warm water. Slowly stir in dry yeast. Continue to stir until yeast is dissolved.

Add salt, sugar, shortening, and milk to bowl. Make sure the milk is lukewarm to room temperature. Too hot or too cold will kill the yeast. Stir.

Mix in the first 2 cups of flour.

Stir and slowly add enough additional flour until the dough pulls away from the side of the bowl.

The flour doesn't need to be exact. You may use more, or less. Many factors affect how much you'll use, which is why bread recipes often use the word "approximately" in the flour amount.

Turn the dough onto a floured board and knead until the dough is soft and smooth.

Put the dough in a warm, greased bowl in a warm location and let it rise about an hr. or til doubled in bulk.

Punch dough down, turn onto floured board and knead.

Form into a loaf and place in greased loaf pan. Cover and let rise for 30 min.

Preheat oven to 375.

Score dough by cutting three slashes across the top with a sharp knife. Put in oven and bake for about 45 minutes or until golden brown.

Turn out bread from pan and cool on a dishtowel or baking rack.

Wait until cooled before cutting.

Last Edited by Nine's on 08/02/2011 05:59 PM
Anonymous Coward
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08/02/2011 05:58 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Bumping for the evening crowd.
Nine's (OP)

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08/02/2011 08:52 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Taking a bread break to post some quick, easy, inexpensive recipes before I forget. Some have never learned to cook. Either too busy, not interested, or think it's too hard. The day will probably come when it's important that anyone who wants to survive will have to cook. Learning now can ease the transition and you may be able to help your friends, neighbors and family.

Even those who have prepped, seldom have enough to offer all those who won't have what they need. When the time comes we may have to help, many won't know what to do with what you offer. That's where your help is really needed. Encouraging them to eat well and inexpensively.

This is not an example of eating well. It's not very nutritious, but when hungry it's very good. The day may come when it will be preferable to have low nutrition rather than hunger pains. Gotta do what you gotta do. Good learning experience too. Though they aren't good to be eaten
as a main source of food, they are great extenders and money savers.

For some reason, kids love the "flour soup."


RIVVEL SOUP

1 cup flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1 egg
1 quart milk

Mix salt with flour, then toss egg lightly through flour with fork until small crumbs form. Stir into 1 quart
of scalding whole milk. Bring to a boil and serve at once.



Basic White Crackers

2 c flour
1/4 t Salt
2 T butter softened
1 c Milk
Salt for the tops (opt.)

Preheat oven to 325~ F.

In a large bowl or in the food processor, combine the flour and salt. Cut the butter into the flour until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Slowly mix in enough of the milk to form a dough that will hold together in a cohesive ball. If necessary, add up to 1 additional tablespoon of milk.

Divide the dough into 3 equal portions for rolling.
On a floured surface or pastry cloth, roll the crackers paper thin. They will look almost translucent.

If desired, lightly sprinkle the tops with salt and gently roll over the dough with your rolling pin. With a sharp knife, carefully cut the crackers into 2-inch squares.

Handling them gently, transfer them to an ungreased baking sheet.

Prick each cracker in 2 or 3 places with the tines of a fork.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until lightly browned.

Cool on a rack.



Corn Muffins
1 cup flour
1 1/4 cups yellow cornmeal
2 tablespoons sugar (more or less, to taste)
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup milk
1 large egg
4 tablespoons melted butter, cooled

Grease a muffin tin (about 10 muffin cups). Heat oven to 450°.

In a bowl, combine the flour, meal, sugar, baking powder, and salt. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the milk,
egg, and butter. Pour dry mixture into the wet ingredients and stir just until moistened. Fill muffin cups about
3/4 full. Bake at 450° for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to 400° and bake for about 12 minutes longer, or until the
muffins begin to brown on top.

This recipe can also be fried on top of the stove for cornbread or small chip size portions dropped in hot oil to
make corn chips. Leftover muffins can be served for breakfast by adding milk, and eaten like a cereal.



Tortillas

3 cups flour
2 t. baking powder
2 t. salt
3/4 c. shortening
3/4 c. hot water

Combine dry ingredients and mix til crumbly.

Add about 3/4 c. water to moisten, pulling the
dough from the side of the bowl into the mix.
If too dry, add a water a small amount at a
time. Let rest 5 min.

Knead. Make into 10 or 12
balls. Flatten, roll out, and fry on hot cast iron
skillet. 1 or 2 min. till no longer doughy.

There are better, more time consuming recipes for tortillas, but this is good for a beginner or someone in a hurry.
Great filled with leftover beans and rice, peanut butter, or eggs for breakfast. Use your imagination. Good bread substitute.
germanbini

User ID: 1318137
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08/02/2011 08:56 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Just got a copy of "Apocalypse Chow", a half-serious attempt at a gourmet cookbook using preps. Lots of fun.

Last night I was looking at storage lists and noticed a recipes page for one of the sites.

[link to www.grandpappy.info]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1490939


This is a great site I used to know, thanks for reminding me of it - lots of different and very useful sections! rockon
Check out my hubs:

Supplement Your Diet With Wild Game - [link to hubpages.com]

Raising Small Animals for Meat - [link to hubpages.com]

Find the Best Travel Deals - [link to hubpages.com]
Nine's (OP)

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08/02/2011 09:05 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
We've all tired of seeing a helpful neighbor show up on our doorstep with bags we know are filled with zuchinni. We've probably been those people at one time, hoping to have someone take it off our hands.

Zuchinni bread can make good use of those zuchinni. It's easy to fix, children love it, it's nutritious, and freezes well. If you don't have space to store loaves, when you're grating that extra zuchinni, put it in recipe sized containers and put it in the freezer. Next time you want a loaf, half your work will be done.

How about those bananas? You know the ones. They lurk with brown spots, threatening to turn black. They're repulsive. You don't want to eat them and you don't want to waste them, but you certainly don't want them to be seen. How about bread? It's easy to get in a habit of using the last of the bananas before they get that bad, or wolfing them down to spare the bread making. Regardless of the reason, we don't want to be sitting with our stomachs growling, thinking of the food we've wasted.

These are "quick breads." So called because they don't need yeast or kneading. Usually go from the mixing bowl to the oven.

Zucchini Bread

3 eggs
2 cups sugar
2 cups zucchini, shredded
1 cup cooking oil
2 teaspoons vanilla
3 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/2 cup chopped nuts
1/2 cup raisins, optional

Beat eggs until foamy. Stir in sugar, zucchini, oil, and vanilla.

Gradually add dry ingredients and spices. Stir in nuts.

Pour into bread pans which have been greased only on the bottoms. Bake at 325 degrees for 60 to 80 minutes. Remove from oven and cool 10 minutes.
(Depends on your taste, but this bread seems better to me without adding the raisins or cloves)



OATMEAL BREAD

2cups...Flour
1 cup Raisins

1 cup.quick Oats
1 1/4 Cups Buttermilk

1t.Baking~Powder
1 Egg (beaten)

1/2t.Baking~Soda
1/4 cup Honey

1/2t.Salt
1/4 cup Olive or other oil

Combine dry ingredients and raisins.Mix buttermilk, egg, honey, and oil, add liquid ingredients to dry ingredients just till blended.

Pour batter into 3 small greased and floured bread pans . Bake 30 to 45 min. (or until bread tests done) at 350 degrees. Cool in pan at least 10 min. before trying to remove.

Raisins don't need to be used.

If you don't have buttermilk on hand, adding a small amount of vinegar to regular milk makes a buttermilk substitute.



Bananna Nut Bread

1 cup butter
2 cups sugar
4 eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons soda
4 cups flour
6 large bananas, very ripe, mashed
1 cup finely chopped pecans or other nut

Cream together butter and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition.

Sift dry ingredients together; add to creamed mixture. Stir in bananas and chopped pecans.

Pour into 2 well-greased loaf pans; bake at 325° for about 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Makes 2 loaves.

I've substituted a cup of applesauce for the banannas in this recipe.




Greenfield Village Hobo Bread

1 cup currants (or raisins)
1/2 cup boiling water
1/4 cup brandy
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
8 1/2 ounces all-purpose flour (about 2 cups)
2 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled
1/4 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 egg at room temperature
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

1. Grease and flour 3 or 4 empty and clean soup cans, or two small loaf pans, or one large loaf pan. Preheat oven to 350º F.

2. Pour boiling water over currants. Add brandy, and let cool.

3. Whisk together baking soda, salt, and flour; set aside. In a large bowl, mix together butter, milk, vanilla, egg, and the sugars. Add the currants and all the liquid.

4. Gently mix in flour mixture and walnuts, until just blended. It’s ok if there are lumps or some streaks of flour.

5. Fill the soup cans to half full, or divide evenly between loaf pans. Bake for 40 minutes to an hour. Cool 5 minutes
in cans or pans before removing to a rack to cool completely.

This is a hearty, tasty bread that makes a good breakfast eaten alone, or evening with hot chocolate bread. Greenfield Village is
also known as the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn Michigan. While visiting one day, it looked good so I bought a loaf. It
ended up being my lunch and supper til I got home. It was great even without being spread with butter or jam,, so I began experimenting
in an attempt to copy it by using the ingredients listed on the bag. Later, I saw this recipe and it matched very closely to the one I'd created except I
used orange juice instead of the brandy,and 1 lb. coffee cans instead of the soup or loaf pans. The recipe can easily be
doubled and stores well in the freezer. Dried cranberries or cherries can be used in place of the raisings. I like them both. This bread is a real
keeper.

Last Edited by Nine's on 08/02/2011 10:28 PM
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 09:23 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
The yeast breads are a little more effort, but worth it.

Honeywheat Bread

3 cups warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
2 packages active dry yeast
1/3 cup honey
5 cups bread flour
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1/3 cup honey
1 tablespoon salt
3 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
2 tablespoons butter, melted

In a large bowl, mix warm water, yeast, and 1/3 cup honey. Add 5 cups white bread flour, and stir to combine. Let set for 30 minutes, or until big and bubbly.

Mix in 3 tablespoons melted butter, 1/3 cup honey, and salt. Stir in 2 cups whole wheat flour. Flour a flat surface and knead with whole wheat flour until not real sticky -
just pulling away from the counter, but still sticky to touch. This may take an additional 2 to 4 cups of whole wheat flour. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to coat
the surface of the dough. Cover with a dishtowel.
Let rise in a warm place until doubled.

Punch down, and divide into 3 loaves. Place in greased 9 x 5 inch loaf pans, and allow to rise until dough has topped the pans by one inch.

Bake at 350 degrees F for 25 to 30 minutes; do not overbake. Lightly brush the tops of loaves with 2 tablespoons melted butter or margarine when done to prevent crust
from getting hard. Cool completely.

(If you don't have bread flour, you can make your own by adding 1 teaspoon wheat gluten for each cup of flour. Mix together. If you don't have gluten, sift the white flour.)



Two Hour Buns Recipe

1 ½ pkg. yeast
1 c. warm water
¼ c. sugar
1 egg

Directions
Beast these ingredients together in a 4 quart bowl, until foamy. Add 2 tablespoons shortening, ½ teaspoons salt and 3 ½ cups bread flour. Mix and knead just enough to
blend well. Let rise until double in bulk. Make the buns
and place in cake pans. Let rise again and bake at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes.

These make good hamburger buns. Just make them a little wider and not so high. When cooled, slice with a serrated knife.




Yeast Rolls


WET INGREDIENTS

2 sticks butter
1 cup sour cream
1/2 to 1 cup milk

DRY INGREDIENTS

7 cups flour, save 1 cup for kneading
2 packages active dry yeast
1/2 to 3/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt

Place butter in microwave. Heat until melted (should be hot but able to stand to stick your finger in). Combine with remaining wet ingredients.

Combine dry ingredients and add to wet ingredients, mix well. Knead for 10 to 15 minutes. Place in warm, draft-free place and let rise 20 minutes.

Put dough on floured board and punch down. Shape into desired shapes. Let rise again,20 minutes or until doubled in bulk.

Brush tops with more melted butter. Bake 20 minutes at 350 degrees.


Feel free to pitch in with some recipes people. rockon
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1486090
United States
08/02/2011 09:52 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas



[link to www.youtube.com]


This woman has some really great recipes from the depression.
Sweet Clara!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1465084
United States
08/02/2011 10:05 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Zucchini Bread

3 eggs
2 cups sugar
2 cups zucchini, shredded
1 cup cooking oil
2 teaspoons vanilla
3 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/2 cup chopped nuts
1/2 cup raisins, optional


 Quoting: Nine's


If you are going to make this bread outside of SHTF scenario then try this recipe. It's much tastier IMO and i make 2 loaves every week.

3 eggs
1 cup white flour
2 cups whole wheat flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
4 cups grated zucchini
1/2 cup of olive oil
2/3 cup of apple sauce
3 teaspoons of vanilla
3 teaspoons of cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt, baking soda, baking powder

I can lot's of meat and rice dishes for my pantry. For everyone who has food saved for an emergency, it is very easy to can beef and rice for a calorie and protein loaded meal.
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
United States
08/02/2011 10:24 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas



[link to www.youtube.com]


This woman has some really great recipes from the depression.
Sweet Clara!
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1486090


Yes she is. She's a real sweetie. Thank you for posting it.
Anyone could learn to cook by simply watching her videos.

Clara reminds me of an elderly lady that lived near me. She lived alone and had been a cook at one time. I always took her to the grocery store. She knew how much I bake, and wanted me to have her cookbooks and recipes when she could no longer use them. She had tons of handwritten recipes from a long, long, time ago. It's enjoyable poring over the recipes, but time consuming reading some of the writing through grease stains, a hurried scrawl, or a skipping ball pen. 8)

It's amazing to me what simple, plain ingredients they used. She often talked about something called Butter Rolls.
I went through the recipes and found the Butter Rolls she was talking about. After that, I made it for her each week until she died. I'll post it in memory of another dear, sweet lady.

Butter Rolls

First you need a biscuit dough. Since she thought self rising flour was the greatest thing to ever hit earth, I used a recipe on a bag of self rising flour.

All you do is roll out the biscuit dough and spread it with lots of butter. Then sprinkle with a "good amount" of sugar
and sprinkle with cinnamon. Roll up the dough and place it in a pan. Then scald a quart of milk and a 1/2 cup of sugar, with 1 tsp. vanilla. Pour this over the roll or rolls in the pan, sprinkle some nutmeg on top and bake at 350. She loved that stuff. rose
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 10:27 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Zucchini Bread

3 eggs
2 cups sugar
2 cups zucchini, shredded
1 cup cooking oil
2 teaspoons vanilla
3 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/2 cup chopped nuts
1/2 cup raisins, optional


 Quoting: Nine's


If you are going to make this bread outside of SHTF scenario then try this recipe. It's much tastier IMO and i make 2 loaves every week.

3 eggs
1 cup white flour
2 cups whole wheat flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
4 cups grated zucchini
1/2 cup of olive oil
2/3 cup of apple sauce
3 teaspoons of vanilla
3 teaspoons of cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt, baking soda, baking powder

I can lot's of meat and rice dishes for my pantry. For everyone who has food saved for an emergency, it is very easy to can beef and rice for a calorie and protein loaded meal.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1465084


That does look better and much more nutrition with the wheat flour. Thank you so much!! hf Also, forgot to add, on the recipe above, I didn't use the cloves. Will have to go back and add that to the recipe. Wouldn't have noticed if you hadn't posted this. Thank you!
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/02/2011 10:33 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Zucchini Bread

3 eggs
2 cups sugar
2 cups zucchini, shredded
1 cup cooking oil
2 teaspoons vanilla
3 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/2 cup chopped nuts
1/2 cup raisins, optional


 Quoting: Nine's


If you are going to make this bread outside of SHTF scenario then try this recipe. It's much tastier IMO and i make 2 loaves every week.

3 eggs
1 cup white flour
2 cups whole wheat flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
4 cups grated zucchini
1/2 cup of olive oil
2/3 cup of apple sauce
3 teaspoons of vanilla
3 teaspoons of cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt, baking soda, baking powder

I can lot's of meat and rice dishes for my pantry. For everyone who has food saved for an emergency, it is very easy to can beef and rice for a calorie and protein loaded meal.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1465084

I can my own beef too. What a pleasure it is to have to only open a jar and heat to have a quick meal. Makes a fast beef and mashed potatoes, beef and rice, bbq sandwich and be able to fix a quick lunch for someone who drops in.

I think we may be a dying breed. If you have children or grandchildren interested, teach them. What awesome memories it will leave them. hf
Startli
User ID: 1443071
United States
08/02/2011 10:57 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Question: How long will Water last if sealed?? Anyone know?
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/03/2011 12:50 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Question: How long will Water last if sealed?? Anyone know?
 Quoting: Startli 1443071


What do you mean by "sealed"? A cap screwed on, or the sealed under pressure, or? They have some canned water that is supposed to have a long shelf life, but it's probably not cost effective by the time a person had it shipped and I wouldn't want to drink something that had been stored in aluminum for 5 yrs. anyway. LOL.

The last I knew, FDA hadn't established a shelf life for stored water.Probably would depend on many things. The type container, where it's stored, how it's stored, does it have a purifier, bleach or tablets, etc.

I bought some bottled water from the store in individual serving sizes and before two years were up, the bottles started leaking enough that it formed a puddle around the cases.

Any plastic has chemicals that can leach into your water over time. The thicker plastic doesn't leak as fast, if at all,(haven't kept it over a year) but don't know if the
chemicals leach as fast. I know it tastes much better than the thinner bottles

The longest I ever had was well water I put in glass qt. canning jars and sealed in a pressure canner as an experiment. 5 yrs. later the water still tasted fine, smelled fine and I drank it with no ill effects.

It was a poor solution though, because of the space it takes. My best solution was to get a Big Berkey water filter. I keep a supply of water, but water is meant to be rotated often. The recommendations I've read vary from 3 to 6 months.

A good water filter offers a lot of peace of mind, knowing you can safely drink pond scummy water if you have to. I still keep bleach on hand, just in case the water is so bad I don't trust the Berkey to do it well enough.

Maybe someone can give you a better information. It's a great question. hf
Nine's (OP)

User ID: 1490839
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08/03/2011 01:03 AM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Sourdough Starter

INGREDIENTS

1 cup flour
1 cup warm water
1/2 cup sugar
1 package active dry yeast

Mix all the starter ingredients together well and place in a medium-sized glass bowl.
Cover with dinner plate so as not to cover tightly. Let stand overnight in a warm place.
Stir down each day for next 4 days. (IMPORTANT - do not refrigerate batter at any time.)

5TH DAY - ADD

1 cup flour
1 cup milk
1 cup sugar

On the fifth day add flour, milk, and sugar and stir. Stir down each day until 10th day.

10TH DAY: - ADD

1 cup flour
1 cup milk
1 cup sugar

On the tenth day add flour, milk and sugar and measure out 3 cups of starter. Give 1 cup
starter and a copy of the instructions to each of 3 friends. Use remaining dough to bake
choice of bread or use in recipe.


Sourdough Pancakes

1 1/2 c. starter
2T. melted butter
2T. sugar
2 Eggs
1 t. salt
1 t. baking soda
1 c. buttermilk
1 c. flour

Put the starter in a warm bowl. Stir the egg yolks in with the starter. Stir in lukewarm buttermilk, butter,
and flour. Mix sugar, salt, and soda and sprinkle it in. Fold it in with a spoon. Beat the egg whites and fold
them in. Cook on hot griddle.


Sourdough Bread

1 cup sourdough starter
1 1/2 cups lukewarm water
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 tablespoon sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons salt
5 cups unbleached all purpose flour

Combine all of the ingredients, kneading to form a smooth dough. Let rise til doubled, about 90 min.

Divide dough in half. Shape into two oval or two 10 inch logs. Place on lightly greased baking sheet.
Cover and let rise until very puffy, about 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 450. Spray loaves with lukewarm water. Across the top, make two deep diagonal slices with a
serrated bread knife.

Bake the bread for 25 to 30 minutes, until it's a very deep golden brown. Remove it from the oven, and cool on a rack.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1433617
United States
08/03/2011 10:39 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
here is a weekly menu from hillbilly housewife that has recipes as well. it feeds from 4-6 people. it may be a little over 70 dollars now but it is a start and people can add and subtract to it.

[link to www.hillbillyhousewife.com]
Nine's (OP)
User ID: 1490839
United States
08/03/2011 10:53 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
here is a weekly menu from hillbilly housewife that has recipes as well. it feeds from 4-6 people. it may be a little over 70 dollars now but it is a start and people can add and subtract to it.

[link to www.hillbillyhousewife.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1433617


Yes, that's a very nice site. Thanks for posting the link. She's got a bread recipe on there that is really nice. It's called Kingdom of Heaven Bread. You mix it up and can let it rise for 12 to 14 hrs. or keep it in the refrigerator for up to 12 hours. It's really handy when You want to have something early in the morning but don't want to do it or deal with the cleanup in the morning.
Zlyle14

User ID: 1479155
United States
08/03/2011 10:54 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Thread: Zlyle's Recipe Thread!

dasbier
Peace and Love \/m
Nine's (OP)
User ID: 1490839
United States
08/03/2011 10:55 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
Walnut Bread

3 cups whole wheat flour
1/2 cup honey
2 t. baking powder
pinch of salt
1 1/2 c. chopped walnuts
3 beaten eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/4 cup oil
1 t. vanilla

Mix the first 4 ingredients. Stir in the
remainder and mix til blended. Turn into a
greased and floured loaf pan. Bake at 350
for an hour. Cool for 10 min. before removing
from pan. Turn onto dish towel or wire rack.
Nine's (OP)
User ID: 1490839
United States
08/03/2011 10:59 PM
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Re: Using Your Food Storage......Recipes and Ideas
 Quoting: Zlyle14


Mmmmmm. Recipe looks good! Goofy Thum Nice to have another thread too. Seems there'd be more interest since they're low cost and use stored food. Ahhh, but someday. Someday soon. lol

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