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And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...

 
haarp-acane

User ID: 1343616
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08/15/2011 11:54 AM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
I myself like a good butter knife!


But in all seriousness, I've been collecting for years. I really get into the new carbon fiber blades. I have a really bad one I carry with me called a black widow, pretty serious.

SOG FACET NICK/SILVER/CARBON FIBER - are pretty nice as well. Your talking pretty expensive but very dependable and ever lasting.
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 11:59 AM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
I myself like a good butter knife!


But in all seriousness, I've been collecting for years. I really get into the new carbon fiber blades. I have a really bad one I carry with me called a black widow, pretty serious.

SOG FACET NICK/SILVER/CARBON FIBER - are pretty nice as well. Your talking pretty expensive but very dependable and ever lasting.
 Quoting: haarp-acane


Carbon Fiber knives seem like a great idea, but aren't they too brittle for certain "survival" tasks, such as batoning firewood?
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
haarp-acane

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08/15/2011 12:16 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
I myself like a good butter knife!


But in all seriousness, I've been collecting for years. I really get into the new carbon fiber blades. I have a really bad one I carry with me called a black widow, pretty serious.

SOG FACET NICK/SILVER/CARBON FIBER - are pretty nice as well. Your talking pretty expensive but very dependable and ever lasting.
 Quoting: haarp-acane


Carbon Fiber knives seem like a great idea, but aren't they too brittle for certain "survival" tasks, such as batoning firewood?
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary



I have never had a problem with mine yet but then again I haven't spent years batoning firewood, YET! It seems like the blade on mine gets sharper everytime I use it. I have split wood at camp sites, carved meat and never had to sharpen it yet. There are however so-called carbon fiber knifes that are very brittle and not true carbon fiber...


In a 100% true survival case I would have to go with my Ka-bar or my Gerber Silver Blade. Good for pretty much anything from batoning, carving and just slicin up some pig! The grip in anti-slip which I love but is pretty big for daily carry through the city (chicago) LOL.. Well depending on what area Im in I guess... LOL

Last Edited by haarp-acane on 08/15/2011 12:20 PM
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 12:19 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
My fingernails are badass
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

User ID: 1307432
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08/15/2011 12:49 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
I myself like a good butter knife!


But in all seriousness, I've been collecting for years. I really get into the new carbon fiber blades. I have a really bad one I carry with me called a black widow, pretty serious.

SOG FACET NICK/SILVER/CARBON FIBER - are pretty nice as well. Your talking pretty expensive but very dependable and ever lasting.
 Quoting: haarp-acane


Carbon Fiber knives seem like a great idea, but aren't they too brittle for certain "survival" tasks, such as batoning firewood?
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary



I have never had a problem with mine yet but then again I haven't spent years batoning firewood, YET! It seems like the blade on mine gets sharper everytime I use it. I have split wood at camp sites, carved meat and never had to sharpen it yet. There are however so-called carbon fiber knifes that are very brittle and not true carbon fiber...


In a 100% true survival case I would have to go with my Ka-bar or my Gerber Silver Blade. Good for pretty much anything from batoning, carving and just slicin up some pig! The grip in anti-slip which I love but is pretty big for daily carry through the city (chicago) LOL.. Well depending on what area Im in I guess... LOL
 Quoting: haarp-acane


I can relate as I work in and around Chicago.

I usually carry something like this here:
[link to www.amazon.com]

Illinois knife laws are kind of confusing, but after reading this here, I opted for an affordable 2 1/2" blade that I wouldn't be too upset about losing.

[link to www.hunterknifecentral.com]

 "Illinois Criminal Code 720 ILCS 5/24-1. Unlawful Use of
   Weapons. (a) A person commits the offense of unlawful use
   of weapons when he knowingly... (2) Carries or possesses
   with intent to use the same unlawfully against another, a
   dagger, dirk, billy, dangerous knife, razor, stiletto,
   broken bottle or other piece of glass... or any other
   dangerous or deadly weapon of like character...
 - 720 ILCS 5/33A-1... A person is considered armed with a
   dangerous weapon... when he carries on or about his person
   or is otherwise armed with a category I or category II
   weapon. (b) A category I weapon is a [firearm or] a knife
   with a blade at least 3 inches in length, dagger, dirk,
   switchblade knife, stiletto, or any other deadly or
   dangerous weapon of like character."

"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 12:50 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
My fingernails are badass
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1115306


You scratch their eyes out girlfriend! lmao
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 01:38 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
bumpsign for the lunchtime crowd hf
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 02:04 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
That's why as far as survival knives are concerned I prefer to carry a large fixed blade in tandem with a small pocket knife and a multitool hf

 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


This is a most excellent strategy. Have the right tool for the job. Buy a knife or tool that will hold up. Prepping is a long term decision making process that happens empirically (tested scientifically through observation of the results over time).

Many people will develop bad blisters from lack of using their hands to do fine or coarse work. Having the right tool saves your hands. Imagine fighting, trying to start a fire, or carry harvested materials with one hand.

I have a very expensive Puma knife. It is an extraordinary knife, given to be as a present, and quite beautiful and costly, and that was 25 years ago. I have field tested it, it holds an edge, and is balanced. That said, I gingerly used it since it has been the only knife I've take in the earlier days, before I carried other backup knives, and due to it's expense.

I have some inexpensive lockblades that I have field tested that cost me literally 97 cents. I purchased them at a discount retailer, since they were not popular, and they have held their edges, have a great serrated section like a Spyderco, and are easy to sharpen, and TOUGH. The exterior is made of some polymer that is scratch resistance. It also has a thumbpiece so I can open it one handed. Since it cost me almost nothing, yet is vital as a tool, I use it more, and still it has held up well, in a variety of uses, that push the envelope of normal activities.

You can always spend more money than you need to. I've stayed out of the debate because I wanted to see which ones were the current popular choices. My choices like many of your own, come empirically. Anyone who thinks a knife will work well, but has not tested a knife that they recommended, well...that is not a great way to evaluate a knife.

In the old times, when people flintknapped, they would make temporary knives for something that they needed to do quickly, and might dull an expensive metal blade that they traded very expensive pelts for. Alternatively, they might use a bit of shell if shellfish were abundant, and such a quickly fashioned piece would do the job at hand.

Do what works for you.

Having multiple tools will be way better than spending a fortune on one. Those specialized tools DO work well, but what happens if you lose it. Falling down a steep hill, fr some distance, and not having secured the knife, you can easily lose it, and spend hours in the brush finding it. And you will, if it's the only one. I know this from actually having it happen. A knife that can be secured in two ways through a sheath, and by making a lanyard to doubly fasten it, is superior.

A Spyderco triangle sharpener will sharpen almost anything and well and quickly and takes minimal skill. It would be almost as important as your knife. If you do not use the knife properly, you will dull it quickly. In an emergency, or lack of proper technique, or simply in haste, you can accelerate the dulling process.
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 02:13 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
Slingblade? neat thread.. cool stuff as always.
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 02:56 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
That's why as far as survival knives are concerned I prefer to carry a large fixed blade in tandem with a small pocket knife and a multitool hf

 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


This is a most excellent strategy. Have the right tool for the job. Buy a knife or tool that will hold up. Prepping is a long term decision making process that happens empirically (tested scientifically through observation of the results over time).

Many people will develop bad blisters from lack of using their hands to do fine or coarse work. Having the right tool saves your hands. Imagine fighting, trying to start a fire, or carry harvested materials with one hand.

I have a very expensive Puma knife. It is an extraordinary knife, given to be as a present, and quite beautiful and costly, and that was 25 years ago. I have field tested it, it holds an edge, and is balanced. That said, I gingerly used it since it has been the only knife I've take in the earlier days, before I carried other backup knives, and due to it's expense.

I have some inexpensive lockblades that I have field tested that cost me literally 97 cents. I purchased them at a discount retailer, since they were not popular, and they have held their edges, have a great serrated section like a Spyderco, and are easy to sharpen, and TOUGH. The exterior is made of some polymer that is scratch resistance. It also has a thumbpiece so I can open it one handed. Since it cost me almost nothing, yet is vital as a tool, I use it more, and still it has held up well, in a variety of uses, that push the envelope of normal activities.

You can always spend more money than you need to. I've stayed out of the debate because I wanted to see which ones were the current popular choices. My choices like many of your own, come empirically. Anyone who thinks a knife will work well, but has not tested a knife that they recommended, well...that is not a great way to evaluate a knife.

In the old times, when people flintknapped, they would make temporary knives for something that they needed to do quickly, and might dull an expensive metal blade that they traded very expensive pelts for. Alternatively, they might use a bit of shell if shellfish were abundant, and such a quickly fashioned piece would do the job at hand.

Do what works for you.

Having multiple tools will be way better than spending a fortune on one. Those specialized tools DO work well, but what happens if you lose it. Falling down a steep hill, fr some distance, and not having secured the knife, you can easily lose it, and spend hours in the brush finding it. And you will, if it's the only one. I know this from actually having it happen. A knife that can be secured in two ways through a sheath, and by making a lanyard to doubly fasten it, is superior.

A Spyderco triangle sharpener will sharpen almost anything and well and quickly and takes minimal skill. It would be almost as important as your knife. If you do not use the knife properly, you will dull it quickly. In an emergency, or lack of proper technique, or simply in haste, you can accelerate the dulling process.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1496915


sheen clap
Great post!

I agree with everything you have said here. Too many people think of knives as weapons when they should really think of them as tools. The right tool for the job might be a combat knife, or it may be a multi-tool. It depends on the task you wish to achieve.

Personally, I've been in a few knife fights. One thing that most people dont understand is that it is nothing like the movies, and you WILL get cut. Avoid it if at all possible.

There is no more vital wilderness survival tool IMHO than a solid knife. A multifaceted approach just increases your chances of survival. Choosing what will work best for your needs is trial and error process.

My favorite lightweight gear combination is me ATC Lagana VTAC Tomahawk, KaBar/Becker BK2 Campanion, my small Gerber EVO Tanto blade folder, and my Leatherman Wave. With those 4 items, I can accomplish most bushcraft chores, I know that I will have the right tools for almost any job that are dependable, and the total weight of those tools combined is very manageable for long term hiking. hf
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 03:17 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
Slingblade? neat thread.. cool stuff as always.
 Quoting: m.musculus


Thanks! hf
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
Schokostecher

User ID: 1506123
Germany
08/15/2011 03:20 PM

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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
[link to www.amazon.de]
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 03:28 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
 Quoting: Schokostecher


I'm sorry, I don't speak German. You have a US link?
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
Schokostecher

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Germany
08/15/2011 03:37 PM

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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
 Quoting: Schokostecher


I'm sorry, I don't speak German. You have a US link?
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


its meant as a joke! the Customer Reviews are hillarius...

[link to translate.google.de]
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 03:50 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
My favorite lightweight gear combination is me ATC Lagana VTAC Tomahawk, KaBar/Becker BK2 Campanion, my small Gerber EVO Tanto blade folder, and my Leatherman Wave. With those 4 items, I can accomplish most bushcraft chores, I know that I will have the right tools for almost any job that are dependable, and the total weight of those tools combined is very manageable for long term hiking. hf
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


Yes. That is an excellent list. If you had all of those tools, you could do very well. I would add a stout shovel in there for gardening and a good crosscut saw and a splitting maul. Almost all other tools are superfluous, but some specialized ones would help you once a year or more.

Spetsnaz were taught to fight with shovels for this reason.

The tanto has a long empirical history as a weapon. I possess a strong, sharp, samurai sword too. That's my equalizer, but it requires a lot of room to maneuver, it's not for home defense. I purchased one that is highly polished. Such blades reflect their surroundings, and under a tree, the blade is almost invisible as it reflects the brush.

Many ancient warriors used small axes of various kinds as hurled weapons. The Franks did this and the Vikings. They are lightning fast. Of course they are practical for cleaning the branches from a tree to make ridgepoles, something you'll do a lot.

Great list.
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 07:35 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
My favorite lightweight gear combination is me ATC Lagana VTAC Tomahawk, KaBar/Becker BK2 Campanion, my small Gerber EVO Tanto blade folder, and my Leatherman Wave. With those 4 items, I can accomplish most bushcraft chores, I know that I will have the right tools for almost any job that are dependable, and the total weight of those tools combined is very manageable for long term hiking. hf
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


Yes. That is an excellent list. If you had all of those tools, you could do very well. I would add a stout shovel in there for gardening and a good crosscut saw and a splitting maul. Almost all other tools are superfluous, but some specialized ones would help you once a year or more.

Spetsnaz were taught to fight with shovels for this reason.

The tanto has a long empirical history as a weapon. I possess a strong, sharp, samurai sword too. That's my equalizer, but it requires a lot of room to maneuver, it's not for home defense. I purchased one that is highly polished. Such blades reflect their surroundings, and under a tree, the blade is almost invisible as it reflects the brush.

Many ancient warriors used small axes of various kinds as hurled weapons. The Franks did this and the Vikings. They are lightning fast. Of course they are practical for cleaning the branches from a tree to make ridgepoles, something you'll do a lot.

Great list.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1496915


I also have an "E-Tool" for when I think I'll need it. Not as cool as the Spetsnaz, but effective hf
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 08:50 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
bumpgirl
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 09:20 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
My favorite lightweight gear combination is me ATC Lagana VTAC Tomahawk, KaBar/Becker BK2 Campanion, my small Gerber EVO Tanto blade folder, and my Leatherman Wave. With those 4 items, I can accomplish most bushcraft chores, I know that I will have the right tools for almost any job that are dependable, and the total weight of those tools combined is very manageable for long term hiking. hf
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


Yes. That is an excellent list. If you had all of those tools, you could do very well. I would add a stout shovel in there for gardening and a good crosscut saw and a splitting maul. Almost all other tools are superfluous, but some specialized ones would help you once a year or more.

Spetsnaz were taught to fight with shovels for this reason.

The tanto has a long empirical history as a weapon. I possess a strong, sharp, samurai sword too. That's my equalizer, but it requires a lot of room to maneuver, it's not for home defense. I purchased one that is highly polished. Such blades reflect their surroundings, and under a tree, the blade is almost invisible as it reflects the brush.

Many ancient warriors used small axes of various kinds as hurled weapons. The Franks did this and the Vikings. They are lightning fast. Of course they are practical for cleaning the branches from a tree to make ridgepoles, something you'll do a lot.

Great list.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1496915


I like my trusty leatherman for a multi tool, but for sheer beauty, I like katanas.

[link to www.legacyswords.com]
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 10:20 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
The thing with katanas is that most are junk. They are not properly sharpened or made. The old way of making katans made them somewhat brittle on the edges and sometimes they would break. The jutte was used by Japanese policemen to catch the katana (a kind of modified sai), and the blades sometimes snapped. It matter little since those authentic blades are horrendously expensive.

There's a few people who've applied modern metallurgy to sword making. These blades are very tough, and not as expensive, and not as authentic since they use newer techniques. They hold better though, and are razor sharp.
They cut rolled tatami mats which simulate the actual drag of a sword cutting through a body. Sounds gruesome, but it's a lot more authentic than some of the ersatz practitioners out there. Many of them can cut not only on a down stroke at the ten o'clock position, but can then return with a upswing cut on the four o'clock position, and even some who can do a third cut at ten oclock again, all before the rolled tatami mat falls. Which is amazing.

Generally these blades have thicker spines than their historical counterparts as well as different steel composition and well as a modification the traditional folding pattern.

Here is one such company.
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 10:25 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
The thing with katanas is that most are junk. They are not properly sharpened or made. The old way of making katans made them somewhat brittle on the edges and sometimes they would break. The jutte was used by Japanese policemen to catch the katana (a kind of modified sai), and the blades sometimes snapped. It matter little since those authentic blades are horrendously expensive.

There's a few people who've applied modern metallurgy to sword making. These blades are very tough, and not as expensive, and not as authentic since they use newer techniques. They hold better though, and are razor sharp.
They cut rolled tatami mats which simulate the actual drag of a sword cutting through a body. Sounds gruesome, but it's a lot more authentic than some of the ersatz practitioners out there. Many of them can cut not only on a down stroke at the ten o'clock position, but can then return with a upswing cut on the four o'clock position, and even some who can do a third cut at ten oclock again, all before the rolled tatami mat falls. Which is amazing.

Generally these blades have thicker spines than their historical counterparts as well as different steel composition and well as a modification the traditional folding pattern.

Here is one such company.

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1496915


What company is that?

I know Cold Steel makes a tactical katana that is supposed to be pretty tough.
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 10:27 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
Cutco knives, obtainable through vector marketing here in canada.

I'm not surprised to not see a cutco hunting knife on the list, they are a low key company because they do no advertising and only sell through word of mouth.

I've had my cutco hunting knife for 10 years now, it has butchered a couple dozen animals, cut open a couple dozen cans, and been used to cut countless other things. It is still almost as sharp as it was when I bought it and as soon as I send it back to the manufacturer's they will sharpen it for free or give me a brand new one if that one is broken in any way.

The blade design is the best I've ever seen. It's not serrated, it's better than that.

I know there are better knives out there, but a cutco hunting knife is only like $60 or $80, not $500 or whatever.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1368376


You have a link?
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


cutco is sharp but its sister is kabar. the solutionis my fav which flips into an axe but was run for very short time,
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 10:48 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
Fixed blade knives are nice but I've grown fond of carrying an axe with me on my outings. I usually carry my marbles #9. It's a good ax, plenty of heft yet light enough to carry without to much fuss.

On backpacking trips I'll carry my gerber camp axe, it has a slightly longer handle with roughly the same weight axe head.

As for the knife I carry with me, that's a gerber multi tool. Ugly black zinc oxide finish but sharp and strong.

:)
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 10:57 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
The thing with katanas is that most are junk. They are not properly sharpened or made. The old way of making katans made them somewhat brittle on the edges and sometimes they would break. The jutte was used by Japanese policemen to catch the katana (a kind of modified sai), and the blades sometimes snapped. It matter little since those authentic blades are horrendously expensive.

There's a few people who've applied modern metallurgy to sword making. These blades are very tough, and not as expensive, and not as authentic since they use newer techniques. They hold better though, and are razor sharp.
They cut rolled tatami mats which simulate the actual drag of a sword cutting through a body. Sounds gruesome, but it's a lot more authentic than some of the ersatz practitioners out there. Many of them can cut not only on a down stroke at the ten o'clock position, but can then return with a upswing cut on the four o'clock position, and even some who can do a third cut at ten oclock again, all before the rolled tatami mat falls. Which is amazing.

Generally these blades have thicker spines than their historical counterparts as well as different steel composition and well as a modification the traditional folding pattern.

Here is one such company.

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1496915


What company is that?

I know Cold Steel makes a tactical katana that is supposed to be pretty tough.
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


It's Bugei [link to www.bugei.com]
These stuff is upper end stuff.

I did a lot of searching and found a place that makes great swords pretty inexpensively. They got started by field testing swords to see how much abuse they can handle in the field since I wanted something that was inexpensive and durable. I'll have to look up the company. I'll bet they're back ordered. Mine is two years old, and I remember that it took a month to arrive. It is excellently balanced. I hope I never have to use it.
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 11:28 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
The thing with katanas is that most are junk. They are not properly sharpened or made. The old way of making katans made them somewhat brittle on the edges and sometimes they would break. The jutte was used by Japanese policemen to catch the katana (a kind of modified sai), and the blades sometimes snapped. It matter little since those authentic blades are horrendously expensive.

There's a few people who've applied modern metallurgy to sword making. These blades are very tough, and not as expensive, and not as authentic since they use newer techniques. They hold better though, and are razor sharp.
They cut rolled tatami mats which simulate the actual drag of a sword cutting through a body. Sounds gruesome, but it's a lot more authentic than some of the ersatz practitioners out there. Many of them can cut not only on a down stroke at the ten o'clock position, but can then return with a upswing cut on the four o'clock position, and even some who can do a third cut at ten oclock again, all before the rolled tatami mat falls. Which is amazing.

Generally these blades have thicker spines than their historical counterparts as well as different steel composition and well as a modification the traditional folding pattern.

Here is one such company.

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1496915


What company is that?

I know Cold Steel makes a tactical katana that is supposed to be pretty tough.
 Quoting: General Troll, US Shillitary


It's Bugei [link to www.bugei.com]
These stuff is upper end stuff.

I did a lot of searching and found a place that makes great swords pretty inexpensively. They got started by field testing swords to see how much abuse they can handle in the field since I wanted something that was inexpensive and durable. I'll have to look up the company. I'll bet they're back ordered. Mine is two years old, and I remember that it took a month to arrive. It is excellently balanced. I hope I never have to use it.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1496915


Cool, thanks! If I ever have enough cash I just might pick one up hf

I don't think that they'd have a big part on a modern battlefield, but when the ammo runs out, it could be useful lol
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/15/2011 11:35 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
Fixed blade knives are nice but I've grown fond of carrying an axe with me on my outings. I usually carry my marbles #9. It's a good ax, plenty of heft yet light enough to carry without to much fuss.

On backpacking trips I'll carry my gerber camp axe, it has a slightly longer handle with roughly the same weight axe head.

As for the knife I carry with me, that's a gerber multi tool. Ugly black zinc oxide finish but sharp and strong.

:)
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1506501


Nothing wrong with those choices. Granförs Brüks makes some axes that are a work of art.

I have an Estwing camp axe that is very useful, and I never have to worry about the handle breaking on me out in the woods.

What I REALLY want right now is the RMJ Forge "Loggerhead" [link to ez061134.ezdriven.com]

or the K5 Tactical "Short Tactical hawk-hammer" [link to k5tactical.com]

Unfortunately I have no $$ right now lol
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."
Anonymous Coward
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08/15/2011 11:50 PM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
I have a love affair with knives. I have owned hundreds. I own and open carry (infrequently) guns. I pass that up for a good blade for this environment. I have owned most on the list (cept the srk. Too much money for a work knife). At 17 I worked at a mil surp storefront till I was about 21. Way too much money and conversation went into this topic. Buy tools. Don't buy into some symbol of survivalism archtype you wish you were. I live in cabell county so I am able to carry whatever I want if its not concealed. The neighboring incorperation of the State of West Virginia has such rights enumerated in thier corperate state constitution. Makes my oc easy to conceptualize from an LEO standpoint. To Me As a survivalist existing neighboring to a small city, I carry fixed blades open carry as a matter of daily life. I carry what I use. I forage plants so I carry a tool that can double from weapon to utility.

Currently this is the cold steel GI-Tanto if in my own neighborhood where I am known and allowed to forage uninteruted. I OC a cold steel Kobun for the downtown businesses. I am known there too but the Kobun does not touch my knees. Gets the job done but a little less outside of consensus reality than the GI-Tanto or my kraton gripped Kbar. Less gaudy at the bar I drink at. These are my EDC. These and duplicates are in my packed bob's. I live here. Not going anywhere and I am part of this community so what I carry is my ultimate survival knife. Everyday.

If crime gets worse I'll carry a katana with honor. I can do that here oc. Not worth the effort and shit yet.

There is no one answer on this knife question. Its individual based. Gear is not skills. It only represents skills to someone stuck in the consumer paradigm. A good tool is a good tool if it meets your needs, is usable without worrying about abuse and is something you can carry without criminal charges EVERYDAY in these trying times.
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08/16/2011 12:43 AM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...


There is no one answer on this knife question. Its individual based. Gear is not skills. It only represents skills to someone stuck in the consumer paradigm. A good tool is a good tool if it meets your needs, is usable without worrying about abuse and is something you can carry without criminal charges EVERYDAY in these trying times.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1309513


Thanks for your input, and you raise some valid points.

I didn't create this thread or my other one ( Thread: What is your favorite survival knife? for mall ninjas looking for their next "tactikewl" weapon.

Many people who have just begun prepping, or are putting together their first BOB, could use a decent starting point for finding the best knife that suits their needs, hopefully from those more knowledgeable (such as yourself).

Of course, they also need to learn the skills that will utilize that knife for their survival, and they need to choose how to best prepare themselves according to their own situations.

As I said earlier, I work in and around Chicago, so I have to be conscious of the area knife laws (I posted a link earlier). When I'm at my house in the boonies, I can wear whatever I want on my hip.

To avoid being without a good "survival" knife while near the city, I keep one in my vehicle. It's not ideal, but it's the best compromise that I can figure out. hf
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08/16/2011 12:55 AM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
I was not trying to be so scathing. Sorry, I realize thats how it sounds. I mean carry the best tool for the job. The job in Chicago is not getting caught on one of their 10,000 cctv camereas breaking the law. So mabe a solid lock back folder such as a voyager tanto (I love cold steel) or a spyderco. In my opinion a folder is a compromise but one thats often nessisary. For any purposes id go lock back or assist with switch type lock. Avoid liner locks like the plague. Even with little gimpy (CRKT) "liner lock safetys". I have scars from 60 -300 dollar liner lock knives to prove it. Balisong/butterfly knives such as made by bear mfg or (much more expensively) benchmade are fine if they arent prohibited by law. In WV the law reads that I can carry a cutlass open carry but not a butterfly knife at all. Go figure. These knife types are strong. stronger because they are bonded between the blade and handel with two points not one like most folders.

If cost is an obstical go for a paratrooper knife. United makes 'em. My buddy and I bought 20 of these 5 dollar knives. Stomped them, ran em over, pulled half the pins out. We could break em. But not so they EVER would fold on us. As in we could ruin them for multiple uses but not so much that they would injur us upon usage.
Anonymous Coward
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08/16/2011 01:16 AM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
[link to www.kershawknives.com]
General Troll, US Shillitary (OP)

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08/16/2011 02:13 AM
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Re: And the GLP Survival Knife top choices are...
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1495111


$325 is pretty steep for a folder. Is it worth it in your opinion?
"What you have just said, is the most insanely idiotic thing I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul."