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After 3 Months Fort Calhoun Ends Nuclear Event? Anyone who doesn't think this was a close-call needs to see the photos

 
thebluestlight
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08/30/2011 12:28 PM
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After 3 Months Fort Calhoun Ends Nuclear Event? Anyone who doesn't think this was a close-call needs to see the photos
[link to enformable.com]

The Fort Calhoun Nuclear Generating Station is a nuclear power plant located on 660 acres (270 ha) between Fort Calhoun, and Blair, Nebraska adjacent to the Missouri River between mile markers 645.6 and 646.0. The utility has an easement for another 580 acres (230 ha) which is maintained in a natural state. The power plant is owned and operated by the Omaha Public Power District of Omaha, Nebraska and accounts for 25 percent of OPPD’s net generation capabilities.

Fort Calhoun houses spent fuel rods in a 40 foot deep spent fuel pool next to the reactor, and when the pool had nearly reached capacity in 2006, OPPD began to store spent fuel rods above ground in dry cask storage as well. In total, the Ft. Calhoun reactor has 600,000 to 800,000 pounds of high level nuclear waste. The storage was not designed to house spent fuel permanently, but when plans for Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository were terminated, OPPD stated that they are “prepared to safely store material on-site as long as necessary”.

A flood assessment performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2010 indicated that the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Generating Station, “did not have adequate procedures to protect the intake structure and auxiliary building against external flooding events.”

The assessment also indicated that the facility was not adequately prepared for a “worst-case” flooding scenario. A number of potential flood water penetration points were discovered that could have impacted the raw feed water supply to the cooling system, the auxiliary water supply and main switchgear (electrical) room. By early 2011, corrective measures had been implemented.

In 2009 the NRC did a flood risk assessment which found that the protection measures were only designed to handle floods to 1,009 feet (308 m) above sea level which was below the NRC mandated elevation of 1,014 feet (309 m) for the plant. The risk assessment stated that at 1,010 feet (310 m), flooding would have “led to a 100 percent chance of a fuel damage if the emergency gasoline pumps didn’t work.”



Via ENFORMABLE.COM: [link to enformable.com]


Photos are great
thebluestlight (OP)

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08/30/2011 12:46 PM
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Re: After 3 Months Fort Calhoun Ends Nuclear Event? Anyone who doesn't think this was a close-call needs to see the photos
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08/30/2011 12:54 PM
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Re: After 3 Months Fort Calhoun Ends Nuclear Event? Anyone who doesn't think this was a close-call needs to see the photos
redface

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09/05/2011 02:21 AM
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Re: After 3 Months Fort Calhoun Ends Nuclear Event? Anyone who doesn't think this was a close-call needs to see the photos
[link to enformable.com]

The Fort Calhoun Nuclear Generating Station is a nuclear power plant located on 660 acres (270 ha) between Fort Calhoun, and Blair, Nebraska adjacent to the Missouri River between mile markers 645.6 and 646.0. The utility has an easement for another 580 acres (230 ha) which is maintained in a natural state. The power plant is owned and operated by the Omaha Public Power District of Omaha, Nebraska and accounts for 25 percent of OPPD’s net generation capabilities.

Fort Calhoun houses spent fuel rods in a 40 foot deep spent fuel pool next to the reactor, and when the pool had nearly reached capacity in 2006, OPPD began to store spent fuel rods above ground in dry cask storage as well. In total, the Ft. Calhoun reactor has 600,000 to 800,000 pounds of high level nuclear waste. The storage was not designed to house spent fuel permanently, but when plans for Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository were terminated, OPPD stated that they are “prepared to safely store material on-site as long as necessary”.

A flood assessment performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2010 indicated that the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Generating Station, “did not have adequate procedures to protect the intake structure and auxiliary building against external flooding events.”

The assessment also indicated that the facility was not adequately prepared for a “worst-case” flooding scenario. A number of potential flood water penetration points were discovered that could have impacted the raw feed water supply to the cooling system, the auxiliary water supply and main switchgear (electrical) room. By early 2011, corrective measures had been implemented.

In 2009 the NRC did a flood risk assessment which found that the protection measures were only designed to handle floods to 1,009 feet (308 m) above sea level which was below the NRC mandated elevation of 1,014 feet (309 m) for the plant. The risk assessment stated that at 1,010 feet (310 m), flooding would have “led to a 100 percent chance of a fuel damage if the emergency gasoline pumps didn’t work.”



Via ENFORMABLE.COM: [link to enformable.com]


Photos are great
 Quoting: thebluestlight


I still think there should be more info coming out about this plant.

...side note, I thought you were done with posting on forums Luke?

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