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BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)

 
RoXY (OP)

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06/19/2012 02:32 AM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Researcher: CIA, NSA may have infiltrated Microsoft to write malware - Did spies posing as Microsofties write malware in Redmond?
By Kevin Fogarty
June 18, 2012

A leading security researcher has suggested Microsoft's core Windows and application development programming teams have been infiltrated by covert programmer/operatives from U.S. intelligence agencies.

If it were true it would be another exciting twist to the stories of international espionage, sabotage and murder that surround Stuxnet, Duqu and Flame, the most successful cyberwar weapons deployed so far, with the possible exception of Windows itself.

Nevertheless, according to Mikko Hypponen, chief research officer of antivirus and security software vendor F-Secure, the scenario that would make it simplest for programmers employed by U.S. intelligence agencies to create the Stuxnet, Duqu and Flame viruses and compromise Microsoft protocols to the extent they could disguise downloads to Flame as patches through Windows Update is that Microsoft has been infiltrated by members of the U.S. intelligence community.

Having programmers, spies and spy-supervisors from the NSA, CIA or other secret government agencies infiltrate Microsoft in order to turn its technology to their own evil uses (rather than Microsoft's) is the kind of premise that would get any writer thrown out of a movie producer's office for pitching an idea that would put the audience to sleep halfway through the first act.

CONTINUE: [link to www.itworld.com]
RoXY (OP)

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06/19/2012 04:20 AM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
CIA’s Hacktivists May Have Had Access to Flame and Stuxnet
Susanne Posel, Contributor
Monday, June 18, 2012
Activist Post

A grand jury in a US District Court in California has indicted Ryan Cleary, suspected member of LuzSec, the CIA-backed hacking group, of hacking into websites such as Fox Entertainment, PBS and Sony Pictures Entertainment, as well as into servers run by several hosting firms in the United States. Cleary also is accused of in a couple of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks.

LuzSec has been linked to Anonymous, which has members of the CIA working in and with the hacktivist group in an attempt by the US government to create a false flag threat that justifies the Obama administration’s restriction of American freedoms on the Internet.

The hacktivist movement has spawned new off-shoots of the main groups Anonymous and LuzSec, named “LuzSec Reborn”, “MalSec”, and “SpexSec”. These groups are using the same techniques as Anonymous, with new names. The nature of these groups is to wreak havoc, break apart, and come together under a different name to begin the process over again.

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]

RoXY (OP)

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06/19/2012 05:16 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
HitmanPro removes KLPD ransomware



RoXY (OP)

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06/20/2012 02:16 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Even bigger Big Brother: Facebook purchases Israeli facial recognition company Face.com
Madison Ruppert, Contributor
Wednesday, June 20, 2012
Activist Post

Perhaps it's no surprise that Facebook has purchased the facial recognition startup Face.com, since Facebook has come under fire from European regulators for revealing a massive facial recognition database and been busted for spying on the text messages of smartphone users, showing a complete disregard for privacy.

If you continue to use Facebook in a state of ignorant bliss, hopefully this will help you wake up to the reality of what this internet giant is really up to.

As a Facebook spokesperson put it, this acquisition seems purely logical and perfectly in line with their business model.

“People who use Facebook enjoy sharing photos and memories with their friends, and Face.com’s technology has helped to provide the best photo experience,” said the Facebook spokesperson to VentureBeat. “This transaction simply brings a world-class team and a long-time technology vendor in house.”

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]

RoXY (OP)

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06/20/2012 05:15 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Google Is Evil
By Rory O'Connor
06.12.12

It’s bad enough when you run a search company in an increasingly social world. It’s worse when anti-trust regulators say you have unfairly and illegally used your dominance in search to promote your own products over those of competitors. Now Google executives, who like to boast of their company’s informal motto, “Don’t Be Evil,” also stand accused of being just that — and rightly so. What other interpretation is possible in light of persistent allegations that the internet titan deliberately engaged in “the single greatest breach in the history of privacy” and “one of the biggest violations of data protection laws that we had ever seen?”

Google’s history of anti-social social networks and anti-trust trust relations that deceptively breach online consumer privacy and trust has already begun to threaten its longstanding web hegemony and its vaunted brand. Now the company’s repeatedly defensive and dishonest responses to charges that its specially equipped Street View cars surreptitiously collected private internet communications — including emails, photographs, passwords, chat messages, and postings on websites and social networks — could signal a tipping point.

CONTINUE: [link to www.wired.com]
RoXY (OP)

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06/20/2012 05:20 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Just Be Evil: The unauthorized history of Google
Google Inc. is back in the news this week, with a fresh round of headlines about the search giant and government censorship. Ironically - though perhaps not surprisingly for the corporate media - the stories are not about Google's admitted but classified relationship with government agencies like the NSA.


RoXY (OP)

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06/21/2012 07:31 AM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Face.com App Allowed Facebook, Twitter Account Hijacking
By David Kravets
June 19, 2012 |

Israel-based facial recognition maker Face.com was the internet’s flavor for a day Monday when it announced it was acquired by Facebook. Rumors put the price in the $50 to $100 million range.

But what was not widely known was that Face.com’s mobile app, KLIK, which allows real-time face-tagging of Facebook pictures, recently suffered a giant vulnerability. A prominent researcher found that the app allowed anyone to hijack any KLIK user’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Independent researcher Ashkan Soltani said the app granted access to KLIK users’ private authentication tokens for users’ Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Soltani disclosed the revelation on his blog Monday and said he had shared the vulnerability with the companies before announcing it. It was patched before he publicized it on his site, he said.

Here’s what he found:

CONTINUE: [link to www.wired.com]
RoXY (OP)

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06/22/2012 01:56 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Data Mining: Big Corporations Are Gathering and Selling Every Shred Of Information About You That They Can
Michael Snyder, Contributor
Friday, June 22, 2012
Activist Post

When most people think of "Big Brother", they think of the FBI, the CIA, the NSA, the Department of Homeland Security and other shadowy government agencies. Yes, they are definitely watching you, but so are many big corporations. In fact, there are some companies that are making tens of millions of dollars by gathering every shred of information about all of us that they can and selling it for profit to anyone willing to pay the price. It is called "data mining", and these data miners want to keep track of literally everything that you do.

Most people know that basically everything that we do on the Internet is tracked, but data mining goes far beyond that. When you use a customer rewards card at the supermarket, the data miners know about it. When you pay for a purchase with a credit card or a debit card, the data miners know about it. Every time you buy a prescription drug, that information is sold to someone. Every time you apply for a loan, a whole host of organizations is notified.

Information has become an extremely valuable commodity, and thanks to computers and the Internet it is easier than ever before to gather information. But that also means that our personal information is no longer "private", and this trend is only going to get worse in the years ahead.

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]
RoXY (OP)

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06/23/2012 07:24 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Global Telecom Governance Debated at European Parliament Workshop
Rebecca Bowe
Friday, June 22, 2012

In recent weeks, the corner of the blogosphere that concerns itself with Internet-related policy has come alive with posts, comments and op-eds addressing the theory that a little-known United Nations telecom agency, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), is gearing up for an Internet power grab. Concerns about this possibility spurred a U.S. Congressional hearing last month; and across the Atlantic, a June 19 workshop hosted at the European Parliament in Brussels provided a forum to sort out “Challenges to the Internet Governance Regime” as they relate to the ITU.

The UN agency, which is made up of 193 member states and specializes in information and communication technologies, is in the midst of preparing for a December conference where it will re-negotiate an important treaty establishing the International Telecommunication Regulations (ITRs).

These regulations lay the ground rules for how big telecoms interact with one another in an international context, setting up systems for things like revenue-sharing, and have historically only dealt with telephony and have never reached into the realm of Internet architecture. At Tuesday’s workshop, representatives from the European Commission, civil society organizations, Google, and other organizations were on hand to share their insights about the how this treaty revision may affect Internet governance.

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]

RoXY (OP)

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06/26/2012 06:02 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Uncle Sam Wants You! … to Combat Online Piracy
By David Kravets
June 26, 2012

The Obama administration is apparently out of ideas on how to protect Big Content from online piracy. So now it’s asking for your help.

Victoria Espinel, the nation’s copyright czar, reached out to Wired late Monday to explain that Uncle Sam is seeking the public’s input for ideas on how to combat intellectual property theft.

It’s a problem costing industry billions annually — assuming that pirated material would have been purchased.

“Recommendations may include, but need not be limited to: legislation, regulation, guidance, executive order, Presidential memoranda, or other executive action, including, but not limited to, changes to agency policies, practices or methods,” Espinel said.

Because we are good public citizens here at Wired, we’ve come up with our Top Methods to Eradicate Online Piracy.

In no particular order, here they are:

CONTINUE: [link to www.wired.com]
RoXY (OP)

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06/27/2012 11:04 AM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
The Future of the Web (and what you can do about it)


RoXY (OP)

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06/27/2012 11:10 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Do We Have a Right to Internet Privacy or an Obligation to Disclosure?
S. Paul Forrest
Wednesday, June 27, 2012
Activist Post

Many in America are speaking of how the right to privacy is being assaulted by Facebook and other social media sites who have agreed to allow the monitoring of their users’ posts by government agencies.

Though these actions do stir the mind of anyone wishing our nation was more just and our freedoms weren’t being ripped apart one by one by nationalistic paranoia and religious revivalism, if one spends a moment to consider the issue in full, a few questions arise that beg to be answered: Do we actually have a right to privacy in a public forum and should we fight to protect said freedom, or should we be willingly allowing and supporting the efforts of our government to watch us for the sake of National Security?

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]
RoXY (OP)

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06/28/2012 02:37 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Megaupload Bombshell: Judge Rules Police Anti-Piracy Raids Illegal
By Juha Saarinen
June 28, 2012

The American government’s bid to extradite copyright infringement king Kim Dotcom to the United States was dealt a body blow Thursday, when a New Zealand High Court judge ruled that the raids on Doctom’s home earlier this year were “illegal.” The decision may doom the entire prosecution of the founder of the file-sharing site Megaupload; New Zealand authorities are appealing.

Justice Helen Winkelmann says that warrants for the raids “fell well short of” describing the offenses they were meant to relate. According to Justice Winkelmann, words such as “breach of copyright” used in the warrants do not provide details of the alleged offense and therefore, the warrants do not comply with New Zealand law.

Further undermining the prosecution’s case, Justice Winkelmann also ruled that the FBI’s act of sending clones of Dotcom’s hard drives to the U.S. was also unlawful.

The images were sent to the United States despite an agreement with Dotcom’s lawyers that it wouldn’t happen before a court hearing on whether or not it was permissible had taken place.

Justice Winkelmann has ordered the FBI to start copying the cloned images in preparation of a potential return to Dotcom. The data on the cloned hard drives amounts to 150 terabytes, and came from 135 computers seized when police conducted an armed dawn raid on his rented home in Coatesville, north of New Zealand’s largest city Auckland.

CONTINUE: [link to www.wired.com]

RoXY (OP)

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06/29/2012 11:38 AM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Good News For Spies and Dictators: ‘FreedomBox’ Is in Danger of an Early Death
By Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai
June 28, 2012

It’s a developers’ nightmare word: vaporware – a term for hyped new software that’s never delivered. FreedomBox, an ambitious free-software project designed to embed privacy and security into netizens’ routers, seems on the verge of earning that label, risking becoming the Duke Nukem Forever of privacy-enhancing software.

Which would be a sad fate for a project that aimed at freeing the world from the shackles of centralized communication services like Facebook, Gmail and AIM.

The FreedomBox is basically a router shot through with free-software. Once plugged into your home network, it will “protect your security, your privacy and your anonymity while you use the internet,” said James Vasile, the executive director of the FreedomBox Foundation, the nonprofit which was formed to develop the technology using more than $85,000 raised on Kickstarter.

The ultimate goal is to give every internet user, no matter how technophobic, a simple tool that can protect their data from prying hands, be it from ruthless hackers, nosy neighbors, profiling algorithms or repressive governments. The box can either replace a current router or simply sit between an existing router and a modem.

CONTINUE: [link to www.wired.com]

RoXY (OP)

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07/01/2012 10:36 AM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Ad Industry Claims It Must Disregard User Privacy Choices to Safeguard "Cybersecurity" - Senator Rockefeller dismisses "cybersecurity" claims as "red herring"
Rainey Reitman and Lee Tien
Sunday, July 1, 2012

At a hearing yesterday, the Senate Commerce Committee took up the issue of online tracking, the browser-based Do Not Track flag, and, in an unlikely turn of events, cybersecurity. The hearing included testimony from Ohio State University Law School’s Prof. Peter Swire, Mozilla’s Alex Fowler, the Association of National Advertisers’ Bob Liodice, and TechFreedom’s Berin Szoka.

While there were a number of heated moments in the hearing, the most surprising was the advertising industry’s claim that respecting consumer choice will harm "cybersecurity." This new argument from the advertising industry only raises more concerns for the civil liberties implications of online tracking and was, as Rockefeller aptly noted, little more than a "red herring."

Quick Recap: What’s Do Not Track and What’s at Stake

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]
RoXY (OP)

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07/02/2012 06:10 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Big 'black box' bro to spy on UK mail & phones
The UK has found another way to snoop into its citizens' affairs. Internet and phone companies are set to install so-called 'black boxes', which will monitor e-mails, social networking activity and calls, and store data for a year.


RoXY (OP)

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07/03/2012 01:53 AM
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UK's Dark Cloud: Web 'black box' totalitarianism


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07/04/2012 09:52 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
IARPA: US Government Spies on Us Through Vimeo and YouTube
Susanne Posel, Contributor
Wednesday, July 4, 2012
Activist Post

Igor Curcio heads a team of researchers at the Nokia Research Center and has developed complicated algorithms that can take clips of thousands of films, and create a movie that is seamless and perfectly matched with an audio track.

Right now Google and YouTube assist corporations in mining for information on internet users by tracking what videos they watch. From there, a profile is derived from preferences.

The move toward utilizing computers to collect and decipher information is being seen across the intelligence community. On the US-Mexican border, developments are moving toward using computers to track border-crossers, film them with video cameras, and use software programs to analyze the data.

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) is a US governmental research agency that:

• Shares information with other US Intelligence Communities (IC)
• Fills in the gap between other agencies
• Provides innovations in line with business models
• Provides intelligence concepts that surprise enemies

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]

RoXY (OP)

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07/05/2012 10:16 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Sentient World Simulation: Meet Your DoD Clone
To be sure, the power that these technologies give for agencies, or corrupt groups within those agencies, to destroy the lives of targeted individuals, is itself a fitting answer to the question of why government surveillance should be troubling to us. But beyond what can happen to specific, targeted individuals in such a scenario, however, is a much larger question: What if this data, our emails, our phone calls, our credit card transactions, our social media posts, our cell phone GPS logs, and all of the hundreds of other pieces of data that are admittedly being collected on us every day, were being fed into a database so gargantuan it contains a digital version of every single person on the planet? And what if that database were being used by the Department of Defense to war game various scenarios, from public reactions to natural disasters to the likelihood of civil unrest in the wake of a declaration of martial law?


RoXY (OP)

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07/06/2012 02:08 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
‘DNSChanger’ Malware Could Strand Thousands When Domains Go Dark on Monday
By Kim Zetter
July 5, 2012 |

Tens of thousands of U.S. internet users could be left in the digital dark on Monday when the FBI pulls the plug on domains related to the DNSChanger malware.

Computers belonging to an estimated 64,000 users in the United States, and an additional 200,000 users outside the United States, are still infected with the malware, despite repeated warnings in the news, e-mail messages sent by ISPs and alerts posted by Google and Facebook.

The DNSChanger malware, which infected more than half a million machines worldwide at the height of its activity, redirected a victim’s web browser to sites designated by the attackers, allowing them to earn more than $14 million in affiliate and referral fees.

In addition to redirecting the browsers of infected users, the malware also prevents infected machines from downloading operating system and antivirus security updates that could detect the malware and stop it from operating. When an infected user’s machine tries to access a software update page, a pop-up message says the site is currently unavailable.

Last November, federal authorities charged seven Eastern European men with running the clickjacking operation. The FBI also seized control of about 100 of the attackers’ command-and-control servers used in the operation.

CONTINUE: [link to www.wired.com]
RoXY (OP)

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07/09/2012 05:41 PM
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DNSChanger is False Flag Excuse for FBI to Shut Out Internet Users
Susanne Posel, Contributor
Monday, July 9, 2012
Activist Post

Today The Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) will pull the plug on the Domain Name System (DNS) because of DNS Changer malware that has been used as a safety net for servers infected by a virus that redirects users to a bogus DNS server.

On July 9th, Internet users will be able to access the Internet if your computer is not infected.

The FBI wants everyone to check their computer by going to the website for the DNSChanger Working Group. When you visit this site, if your computer is “ok”, you will see a “green square”.

When you go to this website to have your computer checked for DNSChanger, you are essentially giving the FBI the ok to allow your ISP and computer to be surveilled.

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]
RoXY (OP)

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07/10/2012 04:01 AM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
14 Incredibly Creepy Surveillance Technologies That Big Brother Will Be Using To Spy On You
Michael Snyder, Contributor
Monday, July 9, 2012
Activist Post

Most of us don't think much about it, but the truth is that people are being watched, tracked and monitored more today than at any other time in human history. The explosive growth of technology in recent years has given governments, spy agencies and big corporations monitoring tools that the despots and dictators of the past could only dream of.

Previous generations never had to deal with "pre-crime" surveillance cameras that use body language to spot criminals or unmanned drones watching them from far above. Previous generations would have never even dreamed that street lights and refrigerators might be spying on them. Many of the incredibly creepy surveillance technologies that you are about to read about are likely to absolutely astound you. We are rapidly heading toward a world where there will be no such thing as privacy anymore. Big Brother is becoming all-pervasive, and thousands of new technologies are currently being developed that will make it even easier to spy on you. The world is changing at a breathtaking pace, and a lot of the changes are definitely not for the better.

The following are 14 incredibly creepy surveillance technologies that Big Brother will be using to watch you....

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]
RoXY (OP)

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07/14/2012 03:23 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
When It Comes to Cybersecurity, Scare Tactics Aren't Convincing Americans to Sacrifice Privacy
Rainey Reitman
Saturday, July 14, 2012

This week, comments from Democratic Senators, a panel of witnessses, and the director of the National Security Agency (NSA) called on the Senate to enact cybersecurity legislation. But a new poll shows that Americans don't want to sacrifice civil liberties by allowing unfettered data exchanges between corporations and the government. Discussions this week were part of an effort to break the partisan stalemate over the Cybersecurity Act, a bill that would allow Internet companies to monitor the sensitive communications of users and pass that data to the government without any judicial oversight. The Cybersecurity Act would also give companies the right to "modify or block data packets" if they do it with "defensive intent," while offering little in the way of liability for companies that overstep their authority.

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]

RoXY (OP)

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07/14/2012 04:39 PM
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15 social media scams - From Facebook phishing lures to Twitter and Tumblr hoaxes, here are 15 scams to watch out for on social networking sites.
By Joan Goodchild, Senior Editor, CSO,
June 20, 2012

The 419 scam

Scammers hack into Facebook accounts and pretend to be traveling and stranded somewhere without any money. The ruse, called a 419 scam, usually begins an IM on Facebook to someone in the victim’s network pleading for help. The scammer claims to have been robbed or hit with another such tragedy, leaving them without any cash or credit cards. They typically ask the target to wire them money for a return ticket home and promise to pay them back upon return.

CONTINUE: [link to www.csoonline.com]
RoXY (OP)

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07/14/2012 04:49 PM
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Report: Half a Million Yahoo User Accounts Exposed in Breach
By Kim Zetter
July 12, 2012 |

Hackers have published half a million login credentials for what appear to be Yahoo Voices user accounts that were stolen from a server.

More than 453,000 login credentials were posted by a hacking group calling itself D33Ds Company, who say the credentials were stored in plaintext, an amateur security blunder. The hackers said, in a note posted online, that they used a SQL injection attack to grab the credentials, but did not say from which Yahoo service they were taken “to avoid further damage.”

But based on a domain hostname that the hackers left in the data (dbb1.ac.bf1.yahoo.com) they posted, researchers have concluded that the credentials appear to have been stolen from Yahoo Voices, a user-generated content service and blogging platform that was formerly part of Associated Content. Yahoo Voices claims on its website that it has “more than 600,000 contributors and growing.”

CONTINUE: [link to www.wired.com]
RoXY (OP)

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07/14/2012 04:52 PM
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When Art, Apple and the Secret Service Collide: ‘People Staring at Computers’
By Kyle McDonald
July 12, 2012

I really wasn’t expecting the Secret Service.
Maybe an email, or a phone call from Apple. Instead, my first indication that something was “wrong” was a real-life visit from the organization best known for protecting the President of the United States of America.

They rang the doorbell a few times. It woke me up, and I tried to ignore it. There were always kids playing with the doorbells in our apartment building. But the kids don’t normally shout, “this is the Secret Service, open the door,” so I took that as my cue to get out of bed.

CONTINUE: [link to www.wired.com]

Last Edited by RoXY on 07/14/2012 04:54 PM
RoXY (OP)

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07/15/2012 11:51 PM
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Facebook Banking on a Cashless Society
Brandon Turbeville
Sunday, July 15, 2012
Activist Post

As if the current methods of evaporating privacy and pushing a world toward the Cashless Society were not moving fast enough, Facebook is now developing and beta testing an app that would allow users to “pay their utility bills, balance their checkbooks, and transfer money at the same time they upload vacation photos to the site for friends to see.”

Essentially, the new application which is currently in beta phase with the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, allows for interactions regarding banking and financial services over alleged secure and private connections.

A similar, albeit attenuated program, is already in existence in India which was created by ICICI Bank in conjunction with Facebook that allows users, “through a secure SSL connection,” to “view account details and mini statements as well as apply for debit cards and request chequebooks.”

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]
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07/16/2012 11:13 AM
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15 social media scams - From Facebook phishing lures to Twitter and Tumblr hoaxes, here are 15 scams to watch out for on social networking sites.
By Joan Goodchild, Senior Editor, CSO,
June 20, 2012

The 419 scam

Scammers hack into Facebook accounts and pretend to be traveling and stranded somewhere without any money. The ruse, called a 419 scam, usually begins an IM on Facebook to someone in the victim’s network pleading for help. The scammer claims to have been robbed or hit with another such tragedy, leaving them without any cash or credit cards. They typically ask the target to wire them money for a return ticket home and promise to pay them back upon return.

CONTINUE: [link to www.csoonline.com]
 Quoting: RoXY

This comment might seem trivial, but I think social media are amongst the worst things to have happened to humanity recently.
RoXY (OP)

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07/16/2012 03:15 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
This comment might seem trivial, but I think social media are amongst the worst things to have happened to humanity recently.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 19309544



It says something about the hive-mind of human beings...

Last Edited by RoXY on 07/16/2012 03:17 PM
RoXY (OP)

User ID: 19973059
Netherlands
07/17/2012 09:22 PM
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Re: BIG BROTHER in the age of INTERNET # (Ongoing - Links, Articles & Videos)
Council on Foreign Relations Meets with Google to Fight International Crime
Tuesday, July 17, 2012
Activist Post

Google will meet this Wednesday with the Council on Foreign Relations to discuss ways that they can use their dominant search engine to penetrate and disrupt international crime.

The intention of the meeting is to find ways Google can monitor the back doors of "international gangs of terrorists, drug dealers and human traffickers" in order to "break into" them.

Pomona College professor, Pardis Mahdavi, who works with Google said "We all know that bad guys use the Internet, but now we're saying the Internet can also help stop these criminals, and help survivors and advocates find each other and work together."

The U.S. Department of Defense will be represented by assistant secretary Andrew Weber. And the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration will be represented by the head of counter-terrorism and transnational crime efforts, Brian Dodd.

CONTINUE: [link to www.activistpost.com]

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