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Wind blows down a house? 16 feet tidal waves? Coverup some groundmovement?

 
dutchies
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User ID: 1509707
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10/01/2011 02:47 PM
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Wind blows down a house? 16 feet tidal waves? Coverup some groundmovement?
Wind is responsible for building collapse


Strong winds overnight could be the cause of a building collapse in Little Village and a fire in Glenview, among other local damage.

Winds of 30 to 35 mph with gusts of up to 50 mph hit parts of the area overnight, knocking out power to about 27,000 ComEd customers. As of Friday morning, 6,200 were still without power, including 3,000 south of the city and 2,100 in the western suburbs.

Bricks from a Little Village home's second floor fell down to the sidewalk, exposing the attic. The bricks littered the sidewalk and smashed two cars parked near 23th and California. No one was injured. The homeowners are responsible for cleaning up the debris on the sidewalk.


Source: [link to www.nbcchicago.com]
[link to www.nbcchicago.com]

Must be some wind, or a badly build house
===========================================================
Wind responsible for 16feet high tidal waves...

The city closed a stretch of the Lake Shore Drive path Friday morning after crashing waves from Lake Michigan knocked down runners and cyclists.

NBC Chicago's helicopter captured footage of cyclists and runners trying to make it through the waves this morning. The city shut down the path between Oak Street beach and Fullerton Avenue about 9:30 a.m., the Chicago Tribune reports.

High winds that hit the area overnight are likely to blame for the massive waves. The National Weather Service warned that wind gusts of up to 45 miles per hour will continue throughout the day, though their wind advisory expired at 5 a.m. On Thursday and overnight Friday, winds of up to 50 miles per hour left more than 27,000 ComEd customers without power, according to the Tribune.

[link to www.huffingtonpost.com]

Again, must be some wind.
Ofcourse, the official version will be that the wind is blowing..
Unofficial, the are not gonna say that its something else.

Read between the lines...

Last Edited by dutchies on 10/01/2011 02:50 PM
One has to live in the present. Whatever is past is gone beyond recall; whatever is future remains beyond one’s reach, until it becomes present. Remembering the past and giving thought to the future are important, but only to the extent that they help one deal with the present.
Dr. House

User ID: 1527778
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10/01/2011 04:16 PM
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Re: Wind blows down a house? 16 feet tidal waves? Coverup some groundmovement?
The elements of a structure can be conducive to even a light breeze knocking it down.

First to be considered is the internal structure.


Racking is a well known phenomena in stick frame construction (sill and stud walls). A stud wall is incredibly strong from vertical pressures (gravity) but is weak from horizontal structures (side to side, wind blowing). The main reason is that nails/screws are driven through the sill plate down into the stud - gravity (downward pressure) holds it all together.

Side to side pressures cause the wood to pull apart due to hinging, were one edge becomes the pivot point and a gap opens on the other end.

To reduce racking, we place sheathing on the wall, then we nail/screw that every so often across the studs. Now we have a diagonal strengthening of the wall.


Racking occurs on any structure composed of more than one part. Brick rack, steel beams rack, etc.

In the case of bricks a brick wall is only as strong as its mortar (cement). If the cement doesn't bond with the brick, then movement from say wind will cause racking to occur, granted not as spectacular as what occurs with unbraced wood studs, but it is present. Each buffet of wind will cause the cement to lose its hold, get a strong enough wind to push enough of the wall out of 'true' with gravity and a cascade failure (collapse) will take place.

Sail and wing phenomena (Aerodynamics). Every horizontal and vertical object place in a place where there is air movement will either act like a sail (presenting a face to the wind that the wind pushes against) or will act like a wing, where air flowing past and around the object will create 'lift' on one side of the object.

Most buildings, rectangular ones, have one side that is being pushed and the other side being pulled when a wind blows. There is both a sail force (pushed) and a wing force (lift) applied to the whole structure. In tall structures this lends to the wind causing the structure to sway. In shorter structures this causes unequal stresses up and down and across the horizontal, thus leads to racking.

All of these factors combined mixed with Minimum Buildings Codes (Minimum is exactly that, minimum) can make a structure fail.

Most likely what happened here is that the 'wind shadow' of other structures around this one lead to a faster, stronger flow of air around the structure, causing a lot more 'push' and 'pull' on the structure, coupled with weak (cheap, minimum code allowed) cement mortar that lead to the structure being unable to remain upright under the loads it was under during the wind.
Sinkhole list:
Thread: Sinkholes Updated 28 Dec 2010
find a sinkhole, add it to this thread, please.

"Whoever hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him." (1 John 3:15, NKJV).
BROOM

User ID: 2438570
United States
10/01/2011 04:21 PM

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Re: Wind blows down a house? 16 feet tidal waves? Coverup some groundmovement?
The elements of a structure can be conducive to even a light breeze knocking it down.

First to be considered is the internal structure.


Racking is a well known phenomena in stick frame construction (sill and stud walls). A stud wall is incredibly strong from vertical pressures (gravity) but is weak from horizontal structures (side to side, wind blowing). The main reason is that nails/screws are driven through the sill plate down into the stud - gravity (downward pressure) holds it all together.

Side to side pressures cause the wood to pull apart due to hinging, were one edge becomes the pivot point and a gap opens on the other end.

To reduce racking, we place sheathing on the wall, then we nail/screw that every so often across the studs. Now we have a diagonal strengthening of the wall.


Racking occurs on any structure composed of more than one part. Brick rack, steel beams rack, etc.

In the case of bricks a brick wall is only as strong as its mortar (cement). If the cement doesn't bond with the brick, then movement from say wind will cause racking to occur, granted not as spectacular as what occurs with unbraced wood studs, but it is present. Each buffet of wind will cause the cement to lose its hold, get a strong enough wind to push enough of the wall out of 'true' with gravity and a cascade failure (collapse) will take place.

Sail and wing phenomena (Aerodynamics). Every horizontal and vertical object place in a place where there is air movement will either act like a sail (presenting a face to the wind that the wind pushes against) or will act like a wing, where air flowing past and around the object will create 'lift' on one side of the object.

Most buildings, rectangular ones, have one side that is being pushed and the other side being pulled when a wind blows. There is both a sail force (pushed) and a wing force (lift) applied to the whole structure. In tall structures this lends to the wind causing the structure to sway. In shorter structures this causes unequal stresses up and down and across the horizontal, thus leads to racking.

All of these factors combined mixed with Minimum Buildings Codes (Minimum is exactly that, minimum) can make a structure fail.

Most likely what happened here is that the 'wind shadow' of other structures around this one lead to a faster, stronger flow of air around the structure, causing a lot more 'push' and 'pull' on the structure, coupled with weak (cheap, minimum code allowed) cement mortar that lead to the structure being unable to remain upright under the loads it was under during the wind.
 Quoting: Dr. House


Quit having an explanation for everything and just LET US HAVE SOME DOOM.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 2427015
United Kingdom
10/01/2011 04:24 PM
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Re: Wind blows down a house? 16 feet tidal waves? Coverup some groundmovement?
so when all the buildings fall down, it's the builders fault.

nice one Dr House. lol

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