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SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland

 
Girl Genius
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04/14/2012 10:07 AM

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SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
So we moved big time on our fruit orchard planting this year and have about 20 good sized trees in and another 5 on the sidelines. After mixed results with the ultra cheap bare root plantings and planting too many "ornamentals", we are gearing our remaining orchard space toward fruit bearing trees. So far we have some different varieties of apples, peaches, plums, and pears. They are young so I don't know which varieties have been successful.

Anyone else keeping an orchard? What have been your best and most reliable varieties? We want to go totally organic and self-sufficient.

Update: We have finished planting our orchard. We wound up planting 23 full-size trees and 30 raspberries, blackberries, blueberries and grapes. We planted with care and I expect a 95% survival rate - we'll see. It's a bit windy today but tomorrow, I will take some pictures :)

Last Edited by Girl Genius on 05/08/2012 12:13 PM
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Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 10:33 AM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
You know, I was in Wally World yesterday and I noticed an enormous bulk box of Hot Pockets. I thought of GLP, lol. I wonder if most of you buy in bulk and what you will do when the grid goes down and they all start rotting.
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Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 10:35 AM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
You know, I was in Wally World yesterday and I noticed an enormous bulk box of Hot Pockets. I thought of GLP, lol. I wonder if most of you buy in bulk and what you will do when the grid goes down and they all start rotting.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


Dig a 5 foot deep hole. It stays naturally cool.
Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 10:41 AM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
If you look at the most GMO'd food, you will find you can easily grow those.

Raspberries. These are the most offensive plantings (lol). They are prickly and will root everywhere if you don't watch them.

Stawberries. Easy.

Peaches. Just pick'em before the japenese beetles get to them. If you think, I'll give it another day they are almost perfect--the beetles will beat you to them. You can still use them, but it will be like chucking corn-getting all the creature areas off and freeze the pieces.

Grapes. Easy, just make something for them to grow on.

Apples. Just make sure there's a granny somewhere in the neighborhood and I believe that helps them.

--There are other types (I'm trying not to be specific-data mining-lol).

So far we had the earliest fruiting (from young plants) with our peach tree. It seems others are taking about 3 or 4 years.
Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 10:48 AM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
You know, I was in Wally World yesterday and I noticed an enormous bulk box of Hot Pockets. I thought of GLP, lol. I wonder if most of you buy in bulk and what you will do when the grid goes down and they all start rotting.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


I know I'm more comfortable stocking up on meats for the freezer in the fall. During spring I start restocking my canned meats because I'm afraid if TSHTF in spring or into summer and I'm without electricity, at least I'll have some meats. My preps aren't very extensive at all but if we ration well we should be able to last a while. The problem is, depending on the event, would we know how long we had to go without shopping again or electricity. If we thought it was just a week, we would eat normally and waste a lot of rations. If we knew it was a long time event, we would be losing weight quickly with rationing.
Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 10:56 AM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
You know, I was in Wally World yesterday and I noticed an enormous bulk box of Hot Pockets. I thought of GLP, lol. I wonder if most of you buy in bulk and what you will do when the grid goes down and they all start rotting.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


Dig a 5 foot deep hole. It stays naturally cool.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14022539


Yeah, I was watching utube videos and they were using clay pots that sat within clay pots with dirt and sand in between and watering them to stay cool, this is above ground. But I think it's the same when in the ground, I need to re-watch some of those.

Everyone's left the thread, I'm posting to myself-LOL.

1dunno1
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04/14/2012 12:00 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
pears do not like to be fertilized (no manure, etc). keep fallen fruit cleaned up off of the ground. don't know where you are but mulberries are very easy to grow and do well from bare root. there is a book on permaculture which helps you optimize your space and helps your orchard self-replicate so that it never dies ("traditional" orchards will only last about 25 years). Gaia's garden is the name of the book. Plant edible flowers under your trees so that your trees don't have to fight the grass for water. daylilies multiply and are edible, perennial (so are saffron bulbs).
Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 12:49 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
If you look at the most GMO'd food, you will find you can easily grow those.

Raspberries. These are the most offensive plantings (lol). They are prickly and will root everywhere if you don't watch them.

Stawberries. Easy.

Peaches. Just pick'em before the japenese beetles get to them. If you think, I'll give it another day they are almost perfect--the beetles will beat you to them. You can still use them, but it will be like chucking corn-getting all the creature areas off and freeze the pieces.

Grapes. Easy, just make something for them to grow on.

Apples. Just make sure there's a granny somewhere in the neighborhood and I believe that helps them.

--There are other types (I'm trying not to be specific-data mining-lol).

So far we had the earliest fruiting (from young plants) with our peach tree. It seems others are taking about 3 or 4 years.
 Quoting: D'Light


I think I'm going to try grapes again. I tried them a few years ago but that was the "bare root" cheapos and they didn't take. I'm sorry I passed up some lovely looking potteds a few weeks ago but I'll grab them next time, particularly with your labeling them as "easy". I have to admit, I never did much gardening until we moved to the country. I always lived in urban areas and still have kind of a concrete thumb.

We've been putting large container trees into the ground to save time and increase chances of success. We picked up two "dwarf" cherry varieties yesterday and they were 10' tall already! I heard the birds are a problem so we'll have to figure that out as we go along.
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Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 12:51 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
did your miss this thread? Thread: Make no mistake Fukashima Is An Extinction Level Event.
Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 12:52 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
You know, I was in Wally World yesterday and I noticed an enormous bulk box of Hot Pockets. I thought of GLP, lol. I wonder if most of you buy in bulk and what you will do when the grid goes down and they all start rotting.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


Dig a 5 foot deep hole. It stays naturally cool.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14022539


Yeah, I was watching utube videos and they were using clay pots that sat within clay pots with dirt and sand in between and watering them to stay cool, this is above ground. But I think it's the same when in the ground, I need to re-watch some of those.

Everyone's left the thread, I'm posting to myself-LOL.

1dunno1
 Quoting: D'Light


I was out moving a pallet of flagstone out of the bed of the pickup with the wheelbarrow. Making some garden paths to connect our three decks. Some of those were freakin' heavy!
For nothing is secret that will not be revealed…

:blue-faeries:
Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 12:55 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
So we moved big time on our fruit orchard planting this year and have about 20 good sized trees in and another 5 on the sidelines. After mixed results with the ultra cheap bare root plantings and planting too many "ornamentals", we are gearing our remaining orchard space toward fruit bearing trees. So far we have some different varieties of apples, peaches, plums, and pears. They are young so I don't know which varieties have been successful.

Anyone else keeping an orchard? What have been your best and most reliable varieties? We want to go totally organic and self-sufficient.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


btdt with much more than you have mentioned. Someday it could work, but not until anyone around to steal the fruit, or willing to bushwack those watering, pruning, spraying, or picking the fruit are gone away.

In real life, the bees seem to be gone around here, even the wasps and hornets, but the mossies, beetles and birds, deer and ants fall upon the trees and the worms( doubltless more nutritious than the fruit themselves) take the best of it.
And then, you have a short window of fruit ripening, and then you have to figure how to store them without them spoiling or using up all your resources and space,

And another thing. "organic"? are you shitting me? YOu gonna be all fussy when everyone is starving and willing to kill for food or any sort and you want to make sure your food is 'pure'?
You clearly have no real idea of how hard it is to bring in a crop, and how much extra work you have to do to get to the same point of food obtained with organics on the scale of even a small orchard.
You'd be far better off stocking up on decent fertilizer and using whatever you can as the opportunity presents itself until the most dangerous time passes.

I've seen my trees get stripped in hours from the beetles and birds, so, if you think they are your pals, you have much to learn, when you have everything to lose in a moments indiscretion.

In truth, the weather has gotten so unreliable that ou could lose the crop.
Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 12:57 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I don't have an orchard but I do have 4 AU Roadside Plum trees, 4 Elberta Peach trees, 2 Fig trees and a long row of Muscadine grapes.
Everything is 3-4 years old and I'll be getting my first good crop this year.
With the fruit trees, you really must spray them with Dormant Oil (once early spring after last frost and once in mid summer) or the bugs will ruin the fruit.
Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 01:01 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1551877


Could be why the morel hunting's been so good. We planted semi-dwarves all well-developed. They fruit quickest. The three peaches we got all had lots of fruit on them. I expect a good amount of fruit next year. Enjoy life while it lasts.

abomb twirl abomb
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Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 01:16 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
So we moved big time on our fruit orchard planting this year and have about 20 good sized trees in and another 5 on the sidelines. After mixed results with the ultra cheap bare root plantings and planting too many "ornamentals", we are gearing our remaining orchard space toward fruit bearing trees. So far we have some different varieties of apples, peaches, plums, and pears. They are young so I don't know which varieties have been successful.

Anyone else keeping an orchard? What have been your best and most reliable varieties? We want to go totally organic and self-sufficient.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


btdt with much more than you have mentioned. Someday it could work, but not until anyone around to steal the fruit, or willing to bushwack those watering, pruning, spraying, or picking the fruit are gone away.

In real life, the bees seem to be gone around here, even the wasps and hornets, but the mossies, beetles and birds, deer and ants fall upon the trees and the worms( doubltless more nutritious than the fruit themselves) take the best of it.
And then, you have a short window of fruit ripening, and then you have to figure how to store them without them spoiling or using up all your resources and space,

And another thing. "organic"? are you shitting me? YOu gonna be all fussy when everyone is starving and willing to kill for food or any sort and you want to make sure your food is 'pure'?
You clearly have no real idea of how hard it is to bring in a crop, and how much extra work you have to do to get to the same point of food obtained with organics on the scale of even a small orchard.
You'd be far better off stocking up on decent fertilizer and using whatever you can as the opportunity presents itself until the most dangerous time passes.

I've seen my trees get stripped in hours from the beetles and birds, so, if you think they are your pals, you have much to learn, when you have everything to lose in a moments indiscretion.

In truth, the weather has gotten so unreliable that ou could lose the crop.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 11132818


Actually, I do have a pretty good idea of how to farm. I live on a 140 farm in a very rural area surrounded by farms and over 100 miles from any major city. We moved here 9 years ago and have tractors and the whole 9 yards.

I hope for good yields because plan to trade with and gift our friends and neighbors. Our closest friends are organic vegetable farmers. They just give us bushels of produce (overage) every fall. We have a root cellar, canning pantry and 4 freezers. I want to give our overage away to our generous friends and have lots of apples for our horses. If we do well we can sell at farmer's market like our friends do but we don't need the money so probably won't bother for now.
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KoFFee_

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04/14/2012 01:18 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I'm envious,tounge wish I had land in which I could do the same.

I rent in a little city where you can just about stick your hand out the window and shakes hands with your neighbor who is doing the same.

I love to garden but the little yard I do have is surrounded by my neighbor's yards that have huge trees and drown out most of the sunshine.

One year, I did try growing tomatoes, squash, corn, green beans and even pumpkins--in the oddest places. The pumpkin vines took over my backyard and yielded about a dozen good size pumpkins--we were happy with that.

When we lived in Florida, our backyard had a grapefruit tree, 2 mango trees, a kumquat tree and a honey orange tree. That fruit was delicious and always plentiful. Boy, do I miss Florida!

Sounds like you keep yourself busy with some wholesome activity--good for you. I wish you the best in what you are doing and hope your trees bear good fruit.

hf
However, I consider my life worth nothing to me; my only aim is to finish the race and complete the task
the Lord Jesus has given me—the task of testifying to the good news of God’s grace. Acts 20:24

"This man really is the Savior of the world!" John 4:42

Look, he is coming with the clouds, and every eye will see him, even those who pierced him;
and all the peoples of the earth will mourn because of him. So shall it be! Amen.
I am the Alpha and the Omega, " says the Lord God, who is, and who was, and who is to come, the Almighty." Revelation 1:7

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Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 01:20 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I don't have an orchard but I do have 4 AU Roadside Plum trees, 4 Elberta Peach trees, 2 Fig trees and a long row of Muscadine grapes.
Everything is 3-4 years old and I'll be getting my first good crop this year.
With the fruit trees, you really must spray them with Dormant Oil (once early spring after last frost and once in mid summer) or the bugs will ruin the fruit.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 11581280



Our friends use chrysanthemum oil to keep the bugs at bay. It's organic and works like a charm. I have to ask them if it'll work for fruit. I'll check out Dormant Oil.
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Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 01:28 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I'm envious,tounge wish I had land in which I could do the same.

I rent in a little city where you can just about stick your hand out the window and shakes hands with your neighbor who is doing the same.

I love to garden but the little yard I do have is surrounded by my neighbor's yards that have huge trees and drown out most of the sunshine.

One year, I did try growing tomatoes, squash, corn, green beans and even pumpkins--in the oddest places. The pumpkin vines took over my backyard and yielded about a dozen good size pumpkins--we were happy with that.

When we lived in Florida, our backyard had a grapefruit tree, 2 mango trees, a kumquat tree and a honey orange tree. That fruit was delicious and always plentiful. Boy, do I miss Florida!

Sounds like you keep yourself busy with some wholesome activity--good for you. I wish you the best in what you are doing and hope your trees bear good fruit.

hf
 Quoting: KoFFee_


If you could grow pumpkins, you could most likely grow melons, too. You could try sweet potatoes (not sure if they need more sun or not) but you could be an Autumn harvester!
Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 01:39 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I'm envious,tounge wish I had land in which I could do the same.

I rent in a little city where you can just about stick your hand out the window and shakes hands with your neighbor who is doing the same.

I love to garden but the little yard I do have is surrounded by my neighbor's yards that have huge trees and drown out most of the sunshine.

One year, I did try growing tomatoes, squash, corn, green beans and even pumpkins--in the oddest places. The pumpkin vines took over my backyard and yielded about a dozen good size pumpkins--we were happy with that.

When we lived in Florida, our backyard had a grapefruit tree, 2 mango trees, a kumquat tree and a honey orange tree. That fruit was delicious and always plentiful. Boy, do I miss Florida!

Sounds like you keep yourself busy with some wholesome activity--good for you. I wish you the best in what you are doing and hope your trees bear good fruit.

hf
 Quoting: KoFFee_


Thanks for stopping by, KoFFee hf

I love tropical fruit but the bugs in FL are too big for me! Those pumpkins/squash can be very encouraging :) I love foraging best of all because the stuff's just there. Last year I foraged over 20 lbs of blackberries and black raspberries. (Yes, I get a lot of good, wholesome exercise :) That's what's so attractive about an orchard to me - the work you put into it builds year after year, rather than a seasonal crop.
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Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 01:44 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I don't have an orchard but I do have 4 AU Roadside Plum trees, 4 Elberta Peach trees, 2 Fig trees and a long row of Muscadine grapes.
Everything is 3-4 years old and I'll be getting my first good crop this year.
With the fruit trees, you really must spray them with Dormant Oil (once early spring after last frost and once in mid summer) or the bugs will ruin the fruit.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 11581280


We had a gorgeous Elberta peach that was flattened by a small twister :(

The ones we have now are J H Hale, O Henry and Red Haven but they are all new so we'll see how they go. Thy are only about 4 or 5 feet tall but all have fruit. Should I inch them off this year?

I have another tree that we planted when we first came - I think it is also an Elberta peach (I hope) but time will tell.

Good luck with your harvest hf
For nothing is secret that will not be revealed…

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Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 01:46 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
You know, I was in Wally World yesterday and I noticed an enormous bulk box of Hot Pockets. I thought of GLP, lol. I wonder if most of you buy in bulk and what you will do when the grid goes down and they all start rotting.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


Dig a 5 foot deep hole. It stays naturally cool.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14022539


Yeah, I was watching utube videos and they were using clay pots that sat within clay pots with dirt and sand in between and watering them to stay cool, this is above ground. But I think it's the same when in the ground, I need to re-watch some of those.

Everyone's left the thread, I'm posting to myself-LOL.

1dunno1
 Quoting: D'Light


I was out moving a pallet of flagstone out of the bed of the pickup with the wheelbarrow. Making some garden paths to connect our three decks. Some of those were freakin' heavy
!
 Quoting: Girl Genius


Sounds like it's going to be very nice!

While reading another posters opinions, I did have an opposite outlook. If I had enough planted (I don't have an "orchard") if TSHTF and as long as I could keep the people from gleaning it all the birds and other pests that I have to compete for are all in bebe gun shot, anyway. If I were that hungry, having food still would help in it's own way.
enigmatic muse

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04/14/2012 01:53 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
tobacco is also a powerful insecticide (you can't use it on tomatoes and other nightshade plants). you can buy organic tobacco online and make a tea with it to spray your plants. you can also make insecticides with water and essential oils like neem and lavender.
Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 02:00 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
tobacco is also a powerful insecticide (you can't use it on tomatoes and other nightshade plants). you can buy organic tobacco online and make a tea with it to spray your plants. you can also make insecticides with water and essential oils like neem and lavender.
 Quoting: enigmatic muse


thanks.


I'm also going to try and put some flowers around some of my other trees. I have daylillies and they are easy. The flowers around the front trees are more like flocks and fire witches. I'm surprised that the bulb flowers won't take more water than grass but if you're right I may use them for the ones in the back. Thanks.hf
enigmatic muse

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04/14/2012 02:10 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
tobacco is also a powerful insecticide (you can't use it on tomatoes and other nightshade plants). you can buy organic tobacco online and make a tea with it to spray your plants. you can also make insecticides with water and essential oils like neem and lavender.
 Quoting: enigmatic muse


thanks.


I'm also going to try and put some flowers around some of my other trees. I have daylillies and they are easy. The flowers around the front trees are more like flocks and fire witches. I'm surprised that the bulb flowers won't take more water than grass but if you're right I may use them for the ones in the back. Thanks.hf
 Quoting: D'Light


Gaia's garden is a fantastic book. Seriously, it makes reference to homesteads in the desert being turned into oasis' after implementing permaculture. you can also plant other "companion" plants under your trees. you can plant chives, chrysanthemums, mint, citronella that ward off insects and other plants at the bases of your fruit trees too. It also gives instructions for building trenches in your orchard, then filling them with branches and leaves. This well help keep the ground moist even in drought. best book ever, very inspiring and interesting. you can go to youtube and search "fruit forests". This method of growing food is highly sustainable and requires minimal maintenance once established.
Girl Genius (OP)

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04/14/2012 02:14 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
tobacco is also a powerful insecticide (you can't use it on tomatoes and other nightshade plants). you can buy organic tobacco online and make a tea with it to spray your plants. you can also make insecticides with water and essential oils like neem and lavender.
 Quoting: enigmatic muse


thanks.


I'm also going to try and put some flowers around some of my other trees. I have daylillies and they are easy. The flowers around the front trees are more like flocks and fire witches. I'm surprised that the bulb flowers won't take more water than grass but if you're right I may use them for the ones in the back. Thanks.hf
 Quoting: D'Light


Great tips - ty, EM hf

D'L - I have daylilies, too - they were among the first things we planted when we moved to the country and they are doing wonderfully well. I will have to thin them and start another patch soon because of their exuberance! Have you done that yet? I split one of my peony patches this year without any problems so I hope the daylilies will go as smoothly :)

Btw, did you know that every part of the daylily is edible and nutritious?
For nothing is secret that will not be revealed…

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Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 02:20 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
tobacco is also a powerful insecticide (you can't use it on tomatoes and other nightshade plants). you can buy organic tobacco online and make a tea with it to spray your plants. you can also make insecticides with water and essential oils like neem and lavender.
 Quoting: enigmatic muse


thanks.


I'm also going to try and put some flowers around some of my other trees. I have daylillies and they are easy. The flowers around the front trees are more like flocks and fire witches. I'm surprised that the bulb flowers won't take more water than grass but if you're right I may use them for the ones in the back. Thanks.hf
 Quoting: D'Light


Great tips - ty, EM hf

D'L - I have daylilies, too - they were among the first things we planted when we moved to the country and they are doing wonderfully well. I will have to thin them and start another patch soon because of their exuberance! Have you done that yet? I split one of my peony patches this year without any problems so I hope the daylilies will go as smoothly :)

Btw, did you know that every part of the daylily is edible and nutritious?
 Quoting: Girl Genius


I seriously didn't know one could eat daylillies but now I do!

I haven't transplanted them yet but I could by next year. What time of year is best? Should I do it when they are back to the bulb or transplant a fully grown one?

The only transplants I've done is for hostas. I just shovel right in the middle and dig up.

At my last place I had peonies and loved them. I keep confusing them with something my hubby planted and I still can't think of the name-LOL.
Anonymous Coward
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04/14/2012 02:22 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
tobacco is also a powerful insecticide (you can't use it on tomatoes and other nightshade plants). you can buy organic tobacco online and make a tea with it to spray your plants. you can also make insecticides with water and essential oils like neem and lavender.
 Quoting: enigmatic muse


thanks.


I'm also going to try and put some flowers around some of my other trees. I have daylillies and they are easy. The flowers around the front trees are more like flocks and fire witches. I'm surprised that the bulb flowers won't take more water than grass but if you're right I may use them for the ones in the back. Thanks.hf
 Quoting: D'Light


Gaia's garden is a fantastic book. Seriously, it makes reference to homesteads in the desert being turned into oasis' after implementing permaculture. you can also plant other "companion" plants under your trees. you can plant chives, chrysanthemums, mint, citronella that ward off insects and other plants at the bases of your fruit trees too. It also gives instructions for building trenches in your orchard, then filling them with branches and leaves. This well help keep the ground moist even in drought. best book ever, very inspiring and interesting. you can go to youtube and search "fruit forests". This method of growing food is highly sustainable and requires minimal maintenance once established.
 Quoting: enigmatic muse


Thanks, I'm going to get that book! That's the kind of stuff I'm interested in doing.

Marigolds at the garden edge by the tomato plants help keep aphids away and so we do do that.

Mint spreads so fast, I would be kind of scared to plant it. But the others sound great.
wisc_natureboy
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04/14/2012 02:24 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
"Walmart"???

verysad
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We all breathe the same air.
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(love/all)
enigmatic muse

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04/14/2012 02:25 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
tobacco is also a powerful insecticide (you can't use it on tomatoes and other nightshade plants). you can buy organic tobacco online and make a tea with it to spray your plants. you can also make insecticides with water and essential oils like neem and lavender.
 Quoting: enigmatic muse


thanks.


I'm also going to try and put some flowers around some of my other trees. I have daylillies and they are easy. The flowers around the front trees are more like flocks and fire witches. I'm surprised that the bulb flowers won't take more water than grass but if you're right I may use them for the ones in the back. Thanks.hf
 Quoting: D'Light


Great tips - ty, EM hf

D'L - I have daylilies, too - they were among the first things we planted when we moved to the country and they are doing wonderfully well. I will have to thin them and start another patch soon because of their exuberance! Have you done that yet? I split one of my peony patches this year without any problems so I hope the daylilies will go as smoothly :)

Btw, did you know that every part of the daylily is edible and nutritious?
 Quoting: Girl Genius


that's why I suggested them along with saffron crocus (don't know if the whole saffron flower is edible though):) You have to plant the saffron bulbs in august. I love the idea of growing the most expensive and one of the most exquisite spices in my yard:)

bamboo is also edible and generally grows prolifically but it can take over so keep that in mind if you plant it. It also makes a great/safe place to hide in, in the event of a tornado:)
enigmatic muse

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04/14/2012 02:27 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
let's not forget nature's abundant bounty either:) get a book on wild edibles.
tandym

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04/14/2012 02:39 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
This is an awesome thread.

I have been trying to grow things here in the burbs of DFW and its nowhere near as easy as where I grew up in Wisconsin. I have grown peppers and herbs, but tomatoes and potatoes have failed miserably.

So this year I am using TOpsy Turvy planters on the east side of my house -- where the plants can get morning sun, but shaded in the harsh afternoon sun.

Finally -- it looks like gang busters. If they really produce as much fruit as I think they will then next year I will expand my efforts to 15 baskets and do some beans and peas and cucumbers too. I am so excited to finally have some beautiful looking plants!!
enigmatic muse

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04/14/2012 02:54 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
This is an awesome thread.

I have been trying to grow things here in the burbs of DFW and its nowhere near as easy as where I grew up in Wisconsin. I have grown peppers and herbs, but tomatoes and potatoes have failed miserably.

So this year I am using TOpsy Turvy planters on the east side of my house -- where the plants can get morning sun, but shaded in the harsh afternoon sun.

Finally -- it looks like gang busters. If they really produce as much fruit as I think they will then next year I will expand my efforts to 15 baskets and do some beans and peas and cucumbers too. I am so excited to finally have some beautiful looking plants!!
 Quoting: tandym


you have to prepare your ground well in this area. plenty of compost and cow manure for these plants. mulch them with spoiled hay and make sure your fertilize them regularly throughout the growing season. setup a rainwater harvester too so that you can water them regularly as well or they will split. we had great success with tomatoes even in the DFW area. buy the smaller ones like grape, cherry and roma. they do better for some reason.

if you have a fence, you can put lattice up to save space and grow pole beans and cucumbers on them. Best wishes and happy harvesting:)

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