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SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland

 
Nine's

User ID: 13741588
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04/18/2012 11:52 AM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
Nice thread, GirlGenius. I'm sure you let your husband know how much you appreciate his digging. That's some HARD work. LOL.

You might want to start saving aluminum pie pans for your fruit trees. A hole punched in them and tied to the tree slows the birds down enough that they'll share some fruit with you.

Chives planted around the base of the apple trees will keep the tent caterpillars away from your trees and good old white flour deters many pests on garden veggies.

Good luck to you and I hope you soon get rewards from all your hard work and planning. hf
Girl Genius (OP)

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04/18/2012 11:18 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
Nice thread, GirlGenius. I'm sure you let your husband know how much you appreciate his digging. That's some HARD work. LOL.

You might want to start saving aluminum pie pans for your fruit trees. A hole punched in them and tied to the tree slows the birds down enough that they'll share some fruit with you.

Chives planted around the base of the apple trees will keep the tent caterpillars away from your trees and good old white flour deters many pests on garden veggies.

Good luck to you and I hope you soon get rewards from all your hard work and planning. hf
 Quoting: Nine's


:)

He just dug me a bunch more holes tonight an we planted the berries and grapes - fixed him some prime rib and morels hf

Thanks for the great tips!
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Nine's

User ID: 13741588
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04/18/2012 11:36 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
Nice thread, GirlGenius. I'm sure you let your husband know how much you appreciate his digging. That's some HARD work. LOL.

You might want to start saving aluminum pie pans for your fruit trees. A hole punched in them and tied to the tree slows the birds down enough that they'll share some fruit with you.

Chives planted around the base of the apple trees will keep the tent caterpillars away from your trees and good old white flour deters many pests on garden veggies.

Good luck to you and I hope you soon get rewards from all your hard work and planning. hf
 Quoting: Nine's


:)

He just dug me a bunch more holes tonight an we planted the berries and grapes - fixed him some prime rib and morels hf

Thanks for the great tips!
 Quoting: Girl Genius


How nice! It sounds like you guys show your appreciation for each other. Thanks for making me smile. 8)
Him Again
User ID: 14558069
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04/19/2012 12:15 AM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I've been putting in bits on unused pockets of land here and there. Blackberries on the neighbor's land behind his corn field, where he never goes. A downed oak tree got the shiitakes plugs. Rhubarb looks like an innocuous something and is good early in the year.

Planting row crops is just asking for theft. Things that don't look like food are great. Leaf lettuce in the front planter will get overlooked every time.
Girl Genius (OP)

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04/19/2012 11:29 AM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
Last night, I dreamt of planting in my orchard. How odd hmm
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tandym

User ID: 1667343
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04/19/2012 11:47 AM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I've been putting in bits on unused pockets of land here and there. Blackberries on the neighbor's land behind his corn field, where he never goes. A downed oak tree got the shiitakes plugs. Rhubarb looks like an innocuous something and is good early in the year.

Planting row crops is just asking for theft. Things that don't look like food are great. Leaf lettuce in the front planter will get overlooked every time.
 Quoting: Him Again 14558069


THIS is exactly the same thing that I would like to do! I agree wholeheartedly which is why the food forest idea intrigued me so much.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 1133676
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04/19/2012 04:38 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I've been putting in bits on unused pockets of land here and there. Blackberries on the neighbor's land behind his corn field, where he never goes. A downed oak tree got the shiitakes plugs. Rhubarb looks like an innocuous something and is good early in the year.

Planting row crops is just asking for theft. Things that don't look like food are great. Leaf lettuce in the front planter will get overlooked every time.
 Quoting: Him Again 14558069


THIS is exactly the same thing that I would like to do! I agree wholeheartedly which is why the food forest idea intrigued me so much.
 Quoting: tandym


I planted a couple of elderberries a few years ago and now they are cropping up all over the area, lol.

Whenever, I have extras, I plant the excess in sunny breaks in the woods.
Girl Genius (OP)

User ID: 1133676
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04/20/2012 12:30 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I was looking for some good mulch and I always come back to hay. We always have extra so the price is right :)

It's a great way to cut down on weeding. Just wanted to share this tip ...

[link to compostguide.com]

[link to www.vegetablegardener.com]
For nothing is secret that will not be revealed…

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Anonymous Coward
User ID: 14381348
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04/20/2012 12:41 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
Spent yesterday pulling leaves off my apple tree. Yellow blisters. I did this with my peach a few years ago and ended up with good peaches, so hopefully it will work with my apple this year.

...the whole time I was thinking of the joys my little garden oasis will bring me as I spend my hour doing this chore with my bad fingers and wrists (which were on vacation for quite a while after).
Girl Genius (OP)

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04/20/2012 01:34 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
Spent yesterday pulling leaves off my apple tree. Yellow blisters. I did this with my peach a few years ago and ended up with good peaches, so hopefully it will work with my apple this year.

...the whole time I was thinking of the joys my little garden oasis will bring me as I spend my hour doing this chore with my bad fingers and wrists (which were on vacation for quite a while after).
 Quoting: D'Light


I have to wear gloves all the time in the garden. My hands are so sensitive. When I am finished for the day, I rub on some arnica gel.

Good luck with your apple! We planted 4 apples. We are in a bad area for apples because of all the cedars (cedar-apple rust).
For nothing is secret that will not be revealed…

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tandym

User ID: 1667343
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04/20/2012 01:40 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
Spent yesterday pulling leaves off my apple tree. Yellow blisters. I did this with my peach a few years ago and ended up with good peaches, so hopefully it will work with my apple this year.

...the whole time I was thinking of the joys my little garden oasis will bring me as I spend my hour doing this chore with my bad fingers and wrists (which were on vacation for quite a while after).
 Quoting: D'Light


I have to wear gloves all the time in the garden. My hands are so sensitive. When I am finished for the day, I rub on some arnica gel.

Good luck with your apple! We planted 4 apples. We are in a bad area for apples because of all the cedars (cedar-apple rust).
 Quoting: Girl Genius


Arnica gel is some good stuff!
tandym

User ID: 1667343
United States
04/20/2012 01:45 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I was looking for some good mulch and I always come back to hay. We always have extra so the price is right :)

It's a great way to cut down on weeding. Just wanted to share this tip ...

[link to compostguide.com]

[link to www.vegetablegardener.com]
 Quoting: Girl Genius


This was excellent. Thanks for the links -- I have sent them on to my parents who are gardening fools!
Girl Genius (OP)

User ID: 1133676
United States
04/20/2012 03:01 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
I was looking for some good mulch and I always come back to hay. We always have extra so the price is right :)

It's a great way to cut down on weeding. Just wanted to share this tip ...

[link to compostguide.com]

[link to www.vegetablegardener.com]
 Quoting: Girl Genius


This was excellent. Thanks for the links -- I have sent them on to my parents who are gardening fools!
 Quoting: tandym


I love old hay. It's great for so many things. In fall, I throw it down in a spot I want to plant in and by spring, it's easy to dig there. It's also good for insulation around the house foundation and the doghouses and can be used for bedding. It's also good to fill in ruts. We cover big bales with empty and painted feed sacks use them as archery targets. And, of course, it makes great mulch :)
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Anonymous Coward
User ID: 15359896
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05/03/2012 02:07 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
Update on my babies.

The peach tree is so overflowing with fruit that the branches have touched the ground. My easy fruit tree caused me to work. We had to get the branches off of the grass. I guess it's because of the early spring weather that there is an abundance of fruit (or fukishima).

My strawberry patch is becoming competitive between myself and a bug that is almost just like a rollie pollie except it's body is a little more elongated. I don't know if it's because there have been only a few ripe enough to pick so it looks like there are more than usual or if it's due to the mild winter not killing off as many insects.
Girl Genius (OP)

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05/08/2012 12:19 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
D'Light, your post reminded me that I planted a few strawberries as well. I did not count them in my total as most were from a dubious "bag of blooms" kit that my husband insisted on buying, lol.

I had a strawberry patch years ago but it eventually succumbed to weeds. I have read that alfalfa hay makes a good mulch and we have plenty of that so I may try a full-blown patch again one of these years. I will be topping off holes (settled dirt) and mulching today.

The hummingbirds are back and the weather is beautiful ...
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Anonymous Coward
User ID: 14581504
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05/08/2012 12:51 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
So we moved big time on our fruit orchard planting this year and have about 20 good sized trees in and another 5 on the sidelines. After mixed results with the ultra cheap bare root plantings and planting too many "ornamentals", we are gearing our remaining orchard space toward fruit bearing trees. So far we have some different varieties of apples, peaches, plums, and pears. They are young so I don't know which varieties have been successful.

Anyone else keeping an orchard? What have been your best and most reliable varieties? We want to go totally organic and self-sufficient.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


btdt with much more than you have mentioned. Someday it could work, but not until anyone around to steal the fruit, or willing to bushwack those watering, pruning, spraying, or picking the fruit are gone away.

In real life, the bees seem to be gone around here, even the wasps and hornets, but the mossies, beetles and birds, deer and ants fall upon the trees and the worms( doubltless more nutritious than the fruit themselves) take the best of it.
And then, you have a short window of fruit ripening, and then you have to figure how to store them without them spoiling or using up all your resources and space,

And another thing. "organic"? are you shitting me? YOu gonna be all fussy when everyone is starving and willing to kill for food or any sort and you want to make sure your food is 'pure'?
You clearly have no real idea of how hard it is to bring in a crop, and how much extra work you have to do to get to the same point of food obtained with organics on the scale of even a small orchard.
You'd be far better off stocking up on decent fertilizer and using whatever you can as the opportunity presents itself until the most dangerous time passes.

I've seen my trees get stripped in hours from the beetles and birds, so, if you think they are your pals, you have much to learn, when you have everything to lose in a moments indiscretion.

In truth, the weather has gotten so unreliable that ou could lose the crop.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 11132818


^
^
This!
It takes years to cultivate a sustainable organic garden that will actually be able to feed you...year after year. Lots of knowledge to acquire.
Have a back-up plan in place as you work towards sustainability. IF things get really bad have some seeds other than heirloom handy….and a little fertilizer. These things may save your life as you learn……
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 14581504
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05/08/2012 12:53 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
PS

Ron Paul 2012!

y_happy
Girl Genius (OP)

User ID: 1133676
United States
05/08/2012 01:55 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
It takes years to cultivate a sustainable organic garden that will actually be able to feed you...year after year. Lots of knowledge to acquire.
Have a back-up plan in place as you work towards sustainability. IF things get really bad have some seeds other than heirloom handy….and a little fertilizer. These things may save your life as you learn……
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14581504


Yes, of course. I have plenty of seeds and fertilizer :)

We're actually off to a great start. We have several acres of blackberries and black raspberries around the fields and edging the woods. I gathered over 20 lbs last year and left more on the canes! We also have fruiting mulberries and various nut trees. I have several books on foraging and gather morels, puffballs, dandelion greens, wild asparagus and onion. I prefer foraging to vegetable gardening although I do have a few large container plants. I may try vegetable gardening again now that I discovered the Ruth Stout method! For the time being, I prefer to concentrate on perennials, although I've gotten sidetracked with rose bushes lately!
rose
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Girl Genius (OP)

User ID: 1133676
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05/08/2012 02:02 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
For those unfamiliar with Ruth Stout's "no-work" gardening system, here is an introduction:

My no-work gardening method is simply to keep a thick mulch of any vegetable matter that rots on both my vegetable and flower garden all year round. As it decays and enriches the soil, I add more. The labor-saving part of my system is that I never plow, spade, sow a cover crop, harrow, hoe, cultivate, weed, water or spray. I use just one fertilizer (cottonseed or soybean meal), and I don't go through that tortuous business of building a compost pile.

Read more: [link to www.motherearthnews.com]

Today is mulching day for me. I'm headed out to throw a few of last year's alfalfa bales into the lawn cart and mulch the berries. This morning I mulched the rose and lilac bushes.
For nothing is secret that will not be revealed…

:blue-faeries:
enigmatic muse

User ID: 15730059
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05/08/2012 02:09 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
quoting earlier ac:
This!
It takes years to cultivate a sustainable organic garden that will actually be able to feed you...year after year. Lots of knowledge to acquire.
Have a back-up plan in place as you work towards sustainability. IF things get really bad have some seeds other than heirloom handy….and a little fertilizer. These things may save your life as you learn……


avoid GMO seeds!!! Nature instinctively knows that these seeds are unnatural/incomplete and if you DO NOT SPRAY FOR PESTS AND DISEASES, pests and diseases will consume them. That is the very definable job of pests and diseases, to cull sick plants and organisms within nature...

as far as "Lots of knowledge to aquire" goes, that's why we are all here sharing:)
enigmatic muse

User ID: 15730059
United States
05/08/2012 02:16 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
For those unfamiliar with Ruth Stout's "no-work" gardening system, here is an introduction:

My no-work gardening method is simply to keep a thick mulch of any vegetable matter that rots on both my vegetable and flower garden all year round. As it decays and enriches the soil, I add more. The labor-saving part of my system is that I never plow, spade, sow a cover crop, harrow, hoe, cultivate, weed, water or spray. I use just one fertilizer (cottonseed or soybean meal), and I don't go through that tortuous business of building a compost pile.

Read more: [link to www.motherearthnews.com]

Today is mulching day for me. I'm headed out to throw a few of last year's alfalfa bales into the lawn cart and mulch the berries. This morning I mulched the rose and lilac bushes.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


sounds like you already use the sheet mulching technique from Gaia's Garden (you may already know everything in that book:) I love the idea of this (spoiled hay, as you use, is highly recommended). Unfortunately, I live "in town" in a very small rural community and I am concerned sheet mulching would have the neighbors in an uproar:)
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 14581504
United States
05/08/2012 02:19 PM
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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
For those unfamiliar with Ruth Stout's "no-work" gardening system, here is an introduction:

My no-work gardening method is simply to keep a thick mulch of any vegetable matter that rots on both my vegetable and flower garden all year round. As it decays and enriches the soil, I add more. The labor-saving part of my system is that I never plow, spade, sow a cover crop, harrow, hoe, cultivate, weed, water or spray. I use just one fertilizer (cottonseed or soybean meal), and I don't go through that tortuous business of building a compost pile.

Read more: [link to www.motherearthnews.com]

Today is mulching day for me. I'm headed out to throw a few of last year's alfalfa bales into the lawn cart and mulch the berries. This morning I mulched the rose and lilac bushes.
 Quoting: Girl Genius


Your on the right track for a sustainable garden.
When you notice that your plants are even healthier than the year before your making prgress.
Dealing with the cast of characters that take up residence sometimes takes a little creativity. I like to share...just not to much.
Girl Genius (OP)

User ID: 1133676
United States
05/08/2012 02:19 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
quoting earlier ac:
This!
It takes years to cultivate a sustainable organic garden that will actually be able to feed you...year after year. Lots of knowledge to acquire.
Have a back-up plan in place as you work towards sustainability. IF things get really bad have some seeds other than heirloom handy….and a little fertilizer. These things may save your life as you learn……


avoid GMO seeds!!! Nature instinctively knows that these seeds are unnatural/incomplete and if you DO NOT SPRAY FOR PESTS AND DISEASES, pests and diseases will consume them. That is the very definable job of pests and diseases, to cull sick plants and organisms within nature...

as far as "Lots of knowledge to aquire" goes, that's why we are all here sharing:)
 Quoting: enigmatic muse


Yes - all my seeds are heirloom. I bought some fungicide and pesticide - most are organic, but I have to admit that I did get some that aren't just in case I have something break out that the organics can't control. I'm very nervous about planting so many trees/bushes at once and want to make sure they get established.

We are going to do our first spraying tomorrow with a "burgundy mixture" that my husband is going to mix up for me. It's "organic", but contains copper so I'm still going to wear a mask.
For nothing is secret that will not be revealed…

:blue-faeries:
LonghairKing

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United States
06/09/2012 09:16 PM

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Re: SHTF Orchard Planting in the Heartland
It sounds like you got it goin on.
I started buying organic fruit trees 5 years ago and have only lost a few to the heat or curly leaf rot.
It`s very hot here in mid summer and one day of 98 degree heat without watering and I could lose more trees. The trade off is I can grow citrus here, I have 16 citrus- oranges, grapefruits, a tangelo, lime and 6 mandarins. Just added an avocado and 2 cascade hops for home brewing!

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