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The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…

 
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 04:09 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
::monitoring:: (in a good way)

I really, really want proof of this and who "they" are. I've known it was true even viewing as an outsider.
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 04:10 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
Now based upon the above story, someone should be able to figure out who this guy from Europe is, so we can start connecting some dots.
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 04:44 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
bump
Even Anders

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04/27/2012 04:47 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
..was the title to the email I just received from someone who can only be identified as John Smith or “industryconfessions”. In this lengthy email was a “confession” from a former “decision maker” within the music industry during the 1990′s. In this email they went on to tell a story about a certain meeting that happened back in 1991 that changed the way Rap music was marketed and why it was being marketed and who benefited from such practices. I’m not sure if this story has any truth to it or if it’s some hoax to get an !! like me to post it on his website but I have heard this theory before and not just with Rap music. So today I will entertain “Mr. John Smith” and share this story with my fellow Councilmen.





Hello,
After more than 20 years, I’ve finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I’ve simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren’t ready for.


Between the late 80′s and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more est@blished company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly est@blished myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.


The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future. Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn’t seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn’t find anyone who had answers for us. A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the “unfamiliar” group collected the agreements from us.


Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn’t the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this.
Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He[..]ured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn’t dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.


A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I’d like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn’t talk or call anyone that night. The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn’t remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention. I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn’t willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free. There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.


As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an[..]embly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.


I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a “quiet” life away from the world of entertainment. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet as a resource which wasn’t at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.





[link to www.dotgotit.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 15064229


clappa for coming out with your story.
You are your own Guru!
Anonymous Coward
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Finland
04/27/2012 04:50 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
It reads like fiction written by an amateur.

It's a well meaning hoax like "Willie Lynch Letter"
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 06:28 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
Rap is so vile and stupid that the only explanation for its supposed popularity is forced mind manipulation and extreme marketing. I have heard similar stories from around this time. Both Belinda Carlisle, a white woman, and Jody Watley, a black woman, were told their videos would no longer be played on MTV and that it was not negotiable. MTV told this to a black woman. Belinda Carlisle was upset because it implied she was no longer popular and was now being relegated to VH1 maybe.. Watley was furious. Her videos on MTV were the big part of her career. She used them to get her music across more than radio or concerts. There was definelty an attempt in the music industry to stear there listeners towards rap music. In fact the brainwashing and mind control were obvious and in some cases notorius. They forced it on people and managed to convince enough of the dumbed down population that not only was rap the cool new thing but it was the only acceptable music for anyone who wanted to be popular, young and do the in thing. A lot of people ignore it and some brave people even fight against it and complain about the obvious lack of talent and extreme stupidity that is rap. One poster mentioned the rapper that became famous even though his music was nothing more than him grunting. A lot of the rap music was simply ripped off from previous artists and made into a joke of song along with a laughable video. Lil' Wayne and the Heart Song What about Love comes to mind. The entire genre is nothing but recycled garbage and materialistic narcisism. It is embarassing that it exists all.

The music industry targeted whites and blacks. In fact I would say that the main target was white children. With this info I am not so sure. Obviously the thug lifestyle and insane materialism never took hold with most white kids but it always seemed to be targeted at whites. In fact a lot of blacks complained that it was mostly white teenagers buying the rap music. A few of the less intelligent white boys would act like wannabe thugs and wiggers but most either ignored it all together or grew out of it. The less intelligent and less attractive white girls would also fall into the group of idiots that idolized the thug lifestyle and played into the brainwashing perfectly. Here again most white girls ignored it but the entire mudsharking craze went into overdrive just like the wigger craze.

The real victims were blacks. A lot of rappers all seemed to have the same defense. They were singing about real life. They were singing about how it was on the streets. I would like to know the prison stats for blacks in last twenty years. Needless to say their poverty levels and education levels have suffered despite practically having money and free education thrown at them. Again this makes me think that the target was whites and all the propaganda and preferential treatment that black got was suppose to keep the thug lifestyle from becoming too much of a problem in the black community. It did not work.

In the end it shows how a small group pf people can really mind f*ck a population. The proper term should be mind raped because so many people hated the junk but could not get away from it if they were in school. IT was forced stupidity and it has created an incredibly dumbed down black population and a lot of dumb whites kids in the process.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 10121589



Excellent post. However, I disagree with your theory of whites being the target. (Though I do think that the white youth became an unexpected by-product of this despicable deception.) If the above story is indeed true, then I strongly believe the prison industrial complex envisioned their future cells being filled with black youth and not young white youth. Look at some of the statistics that many here on GLP and other sites love to throw out concerning 'black crime'. These buster-head 'decision makers' wanted to kill a few birds with one stone. Changing laws that targets these youths, buying lawyers & judges to see that there is a constant supply of black youth, filling their prison cells to the max for profit, and ultimately destroying an entire generation of blacks are the 'birds'. Rap music and the music industry is the 'stone'.

What we have now is a cycle of destruction. We have a music industry pushing a 'way of lifestyle' for these young black youth. These youth act out accordingly based upon what they see in the rap music industry and in their neighborhoods on a daily basis. The legal system is eagerly waiting to bring them into this system. The younger the better. Remember once these youth get something on their record, it becomes increasingly harder to get back on the right track. This is exactly what these 'decision makers' are counting on; which explains why it is crucial to continue pushing rap music that sells this criminal lifestyle. Thus perpetuating and feeding this prison industrial complex as we see it today. Once these youth become apart of 'the system', it's extremely hard to break out of it. As a matter of fact, the rap music industry actually promotes that being a 'thug' and going to prison is a badge of honor or what the youth today may call having 'street creds'.

This diatribe is not to make excuses for these young black youth, it's just another classic example of mind-control. An extremely self-destructive example of it to say the least.
 Quoting: Cell Therapy

As to white youth being 'unintended byproducts', not too sure. It looks to me as if they are on the same conveyer belt, but behind blacks. Or maybe a parallel one that was started up later than the first. Atlantic Monthly: "The End of Men?" cover story mockuments a long-planned phenomenon, seems to me. wasn't it deliberate policy in the past to make black men superfluous to the needs of black women and children? Same with white guys now?
Every little mishap, like being the innocent party in a dust-up at school is handled in a new "zero-tolerance" manner and can result in suspension,etc, as the beginning of one's "having a criminal record". this definitely affects whites too.
Monbazillac

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04/27/2012 06:31 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
Now based upon the above story, someone should be able to figure out who this guy from Europe is, so we can start connecting some dots.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1314724


europe is huge, we need more than just this info to find him...
Monbazillac

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04/27/2012 06:34 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.


with who exactly hiding
 Quoting: Monbazillac

or with 'what'
 Quoting: khnum 455005


yep hiding
Anonymous Coward
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United Kingdom
04/27/2012 06:36 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
The music industry targeted whites and blacks. In fact I would say that the main target was white children.



 Quoting: Cell Therapy


rap music is targeted at black kids make no mistake about that,you sir are deluded!
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 06:41 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
The music industry targeted whites and blacks. In fact I would say that the main target was white children.



 Quoting: Cell Therapy


rap music is targeted at black kids make no mistake about that,you sir are deluded!
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 831183


if black men are profitably converted to prison fodder, why not white men too?
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 06:57 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
surprised i am the first but come on people.. this is the biggest crock of poop i've read in awhile.

bsflagbsflagbsflag
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 06:58 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
surprised i am the first but come on people.. this is the biggest crock of poop i've read in awhile.

bsflagbsflagbsflag
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 10153246



im not saying rap music isnt 'social engineering' but this story is amateur fiction as a previous poster opined.
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 07:03 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
The music industry targeted whites and blacks. In fact I would say that the main target was white children.



 Quoting: Cell Therapy


rap music is targeted at black kids make no mistake about that,you sir are deluded!
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 831183


if black men are profitably converted to prison fodder, why not white men too?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 10858311
Anonymous Coward
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United States
04/27/2012 07:06 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
Better to have the dumbass thugs behind bars than roaming free!
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 07:09 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
As to white youth being 'unintended byproducts', not too sure. It looks to me as if they are on the same conveyer belt, but behind blacks. Or maybe a parallel one that was started up later than the first. Atlantic Monthly: "The End of Men?" cover story mockuments a long-planned phenomenon, seems to me. wasn't it deliberate policy in the past to make black men superfluous to the needs of black women and children? Same with white guys now?
Every little mishap, like being the innocent party in a dust-up at school is handled in a new "zero-tolerance" manner and can result in suspension,etc, as the beginning of one's "having a criminal record". this definitely affects whites too.
Damien

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04/27/2012 07:19 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…

Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes.
Carl Jung
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 08:22 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
If rap destroyed black people, then why hasn't country music destroyed poor white people? It's all about being cheated on or done wrong or drinking. It is as loathsome as rap, yet no one gets any flack for the themes in country music.

Or death metal? Why didn't heavy metal turn us all into devil worshiping nihilists?

Could it be that music reflects culture? Ever hear the saying "you can't write if you don't relate"? Or that maybe the agenda the industry has is to sell recordings? Why would it sell recordings that people can't relate to?

I think perhaps you folk have cause and effect mixed up.
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 08:50 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
If rap destroyed black people, then why hasn't country music destroyed poor white people? It's all about being cheated on or done wrong or drinking. It is as loathsome as rap, yet no one gets any flack for the themes in country music.

Or death metal? Why didn't heavy metal turn us all into devil worshiping nihilists?

Could it be that music reflects culture? Ever hear the saying "you can't write if you don't relate"? Or that maybe the agenda the industry has is to sell recordings? Why would it sell recordings that people can't relate to?

I think perhaps you folk have cause and effect mixed up.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1535422


Could it be that both those forms -country and heavy metal HAVE done harm to their fans. If you ask me, both those population segments look harmed. To the extent they aren't "destroyed", maybe they aren't meant to be? or not yet? Blacks aren't "destroyed" either. they seem to be a profit center, according to thread.
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 09:27 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
It reads like fiction written by an amateur.

It's a well meaning hoax like "Willie Lynch Letter"
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 4243405


No, it reads like truth!
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 10:01 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
I have two sons that when very young were pretty good kids. They started to listen to gansta rap in their early teens. I raised heck about it because of the violence. They still found ways to hear it. One song was step by step directions on how to make crack cocaine. Being young and VERY impressionable, they both started imitating in real life to this music, stealing, robbing houses, you name it. We are white people and I dont blame rap for all their bad behavior but it sure turned them into different people.
I know I am

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04/27/2012 10:22 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
Thanks for info
bump
Anonymous Coward
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Canada
04/27/2012 10:33 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
Premise is close, very impressive, but you've failed in description of the application/execution. (Guns at meeting and so on) Not a bad story though, I give you a c+ for effort.

Keep up the good work. hf
AWFEKKIT

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Egypt
04/27/2012 10:39 AM

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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
Google Arabic rap.
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 10:46 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
this is modus operandi of the Culture Creation Industry.

Internet/Music/TV/Movies/Magazines social engineering. going on now x1000
William_the_Bloody

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04/27/2012 11:02 AM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
I seem to remember Rap going gangster as early as 1988...it went hand-in-hand with crack cocaine availability/use in the suburbs.
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 12:58 PM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
I seem to remember Rap going gangster as early as 1988...it went hand-in-hand with crack cocaine availability/use in the suburbs.
 Quoting: William_the_Bloody


That's another agenda for another thread. And yes, rap music was the vehicle that delivered the results they wanted.
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 01:11 PM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
I wish I could remember the guy's name, he's a futurist and he goes on Coast to Coast now and again. He's a jewish. I was listening to him one night maybe 4 years ago, and he mentioned that in the 90's he worked as an image man for a major record company. That was his job at the time. They would give him an up and coming star and he would pick the stars clothes and the cars he drove, the songs he would sing, and things like that to create an image for that potential star.

He says one day in the early 90's his boss sends him down to work with this rapper, nobody had herard of him yet and he was never named. So he goes to meet the rapper and asks to hear some of his songs. They were all about murder and drugs and shooting cops and he was totaly disgusted and shocked by it.

He goes back to his boss and asks why this lowlife asshole is in the pipe to stardom. His boss tells him that rap is taking a new direction and this is the guy they are going with. If anyone can recall the guy's name I could [probably find the audio of it.

It basicly compliments the story above. I don't doubt it's true.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 15100775


I believe the mans name is: Howard Bloom
Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 01:15 PM
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Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 01:19 PM
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Anonymous Coward
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04/27/2012 02:47 PM
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Re: The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
This is ASTONISHING information...

Jaw dropping...


And sounds legit, since anyone who knows a little about rap music, can realize that rap music really DO changed after the end of the Soviet Union, and after George Bush talked about the "New World Order" in that speech...

Rap music in the 80's was very different of rap music in the 90's...

News








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