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This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'

 
MayanGod
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07/05/2012 08:41 PM
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This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
[link to news.yahoo.com]

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you want a glimpse of some of the worst of global warming, scientists suggest taking a look at U.S. weather in recent weeks.
Horrendous wildfires. Oppressive heat waves. Devastating droughts. Flooding from giant deluges. And a powerful freak wind storm called a derecho.
These are the kinds of extremes climate scientists have predicted will come with climate change, although it's far too early to say that is the cause. Nor will they say global warming is the reason 3,215 daily high temperature records were set in the month of June.
Scientifically linking individual weather events to climate change takes intensive study, complicated mathematics, computer models and lots of time. Sometimes it isn't caused by global warming. Weather is always variable; freak things happen.
And this weather has been local. Europe, Asia and Africa aren't having similar disasters now, although they've had their own extreme events in recent years.
But since at least 1988, climate scientists have warned that climate change would bring, in general, increased heat waves, more droughts, more sudden downpours, more widespread wildfires and worsening storms. In the United States, those extremes are happening here and now.
So far this year, more than 2.1 million acres have burned in wildfires, more than 113 million people in the U.S. were in areas under extreme heat advisories last Friday, two-thirds of the country is experiencing drought, and earlier in June, deluges flooded Minnesota and Florida.
"This is what global warming looks like at the regional or personal level," said Jonathan Overpeck, professor of geosciences and atmospheric sciences at the University of Arizona. "The extra heat increases the odds of worse heat waves, droughts, storms and wildfire. This is certainly what I and many other climate scientists have been warning about."
Kevin Trenberth, head of climate analysis at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in fire-charred Colorado, said these are the very record-breaking conditions he has said would happen, but many people wouldn't listen. So it's I told-you-so time, he said.
As recently as March, a special report an extreme events and disasters by the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned of "unprecedented extreme weather and climate events." Its lead author, Chris Field of the Carnegie Institution and Stanford University, said Monday, "It's really dramatic how many of the patterns that we've talked about as the expression of the extremes are hitting the U.S. right now."
"What we're seeing really is a window into what global warming really looks like," said Princeton University geosciences and international affairs professor Michael Oppenheimer. "It looks like heat. It looks like fires. It looks like this kind of environmental disasters."
Oppenheimer said that on Thursday. That was before the East Coast was hit with triple-digit temperatures and before a derecho — an unusually strong, long-lived and large straight-line wind storm — blew through Chicago to Washington. The storm and its aftermath killed more than 20 people and left millions without electricity. Experts say it had energy readings five times that of normal thunderstorms.
Fueled by the record high heat, this was one of the most powerful of this type of storm in the region in recent history, said research meteorologist Harold Brooks of the National Severe Storm Laboratory in Norman, Okla. Scientists expect "non-tornadic wind events" like this one and other thunderstorms to increase with climate change because of the heat and instability, he said.
Such patterns haven't happened only in the past week or two. The spring and winter in the U.S. were the warmest on record and among the least snowy, setting the stage for the weather extremes to come, scientists say.
Since Jan. 1, the United States has set more than 40,000 hot temperature records, but fewer than 6,000 cold temperature records, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Through most of last century, the U.S. used to set cold and hot records evenly, but in the first decade of this century America set two hot records for every cold one, said Jerry Meehl, a climate extreme expert at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. This year the ratio is about 7 hot to 1 cold. Some computer models say that ratio will hit 20-to-1 by midcentury, Meehl said.
"In the future you would expect larger, longer more intense heat waves and we've seen that in the last few summers," NOAA Climate Monitoring chief Derek Arndt said.
The 100-degree heat, drought, early snowpack melt and beetles waking from hibernation early to strip trees all combined to set the stage for the current unusual spread of wildfires in the West, said University of Montana ecosystems professor Steven Running, an expert on wildfires.
While at least 15 climate scientists told The Associated Press that this long hot U.S. summer is consistent with what is to be expected in global warming, history is full of such extremes, said John Christy at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. He's a global warming skeptic who says, "The guilty party in my view is Mother Nature."
But the vast majority of mainstream climate scientists, such as Meehl, disagree: "This is what global warming is like, and we'll see more of this as we go into the future."
"The face of this entire planet could be rearranged in a matter of days; not thousands or millions of years. If we haven’t learned that by now because of the hardness of the scientific heart; we’re about to."
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2012 08:43 PM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
it's freezing in australia

i guess "global" must mean "USA"
Anonymous Coward
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Czech Republic
07/05/2012 08:45 PM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
Bullshit
samanthasunflower

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07/05/2012 08:45 PM

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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
it's freezing in australia

i guess "global" must mean "USA"
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 19048689


No, global only means Eastern US. The West Coast has been freezing. We are only now just getting to normal temperatures.

flick
Anonymous Coward
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Russian Federation
07/05/2012 08:48 PM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
it's freezing in australia

i guess "global" must mean "USA"
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 19048689


lol

Very cold summer here in Moscow. I think it's the coldest one in my lifetime yet (24 years).
Anonymous Coward
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Australia
07/05/2012 09:21 PM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
it's freezing in australia

i guess "global" must mean "USA"
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 19048689


No, global only means Eastern US. The West Coast has been freezing. We are only now just getting to normal temperatures.

flick
 Quoting: samanthasunflower


ohh sorry, well you can see how i got confused, huh
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 19188418
United States
07/05/2012 11:35 PM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
it's freezing in australia

i guess "global" must mean "USA"
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 19048689


No, global only means Eastern US. The West Coast has been freezing. We are only now just getting to normal temperatures.

flick
 Quoting: samanthasunflower


ohh sorry, well you can see how i got confused, huh
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 19048689




of course your confused

you've been lied to systematically

all of your life

and that has in no way changed of late

with reference to "global warming"
Anonymous Coward
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United States
07/05/2012 11:38 PM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
it's freezing in australia

i guess "global" must mean "USA"
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 19048689


lol

Very cold summer here in Moscow. I think it's the coldest one in my lifetime yet (24 years).
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 4382839


Europe got hammered this year, the gulf stream keep the cold air over the arctic.
SEM
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07/05/2012 11:41 PM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
[link to news.yahoo.com]

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you want a glimpse of some of the worst of global warming, scientists suggest taking a look at U.S. weather in recent weeks.
Horrendous wildfires. Oppressive heat waves. Devastating droughts. Flooding from giant deluges. And a powerful freak wind storm called a derecho.
These are the kinds of extremes climate scientists have predicted will come with climate change, although it's far too early to say that is the cause. Nor will they say global warming is the reason 3,215 daily high temperature records were set in the month of June.
Scientifically linking individual weather events to climate change takes intensive study, complicated mathematics, computer models and lots of time. Sometimes it isn't caused by global warming. Weather is always variable; freak things happen.
And this weather has been local. Europe, Asia and Africa aren't having similar disasters now, although they've had their own extreme events in recent years.
But since at least 1988, climate scientists have warned that climate change would bring, in general, increased heat waves, more droughts, more sudden downpours, more widespread wildfires and worsening storms. In the United States, those extremes are happening here and now.
So far this year, more than 2.1 million acres have burned in wildfires, more than 113 million people in the U.S. were in areas under extreme heat advisories last Friday, two-thirds of the country is experiencing drought, and earlier in June, deluges flooded Minnesota and Florida.
"This is what global warming looks like at the regional or personal level," said Jonathan Overpeck, professor of geosciences and atmospheric sciences at the University of Arizona. "The extra heat increases the odds of worse heat waves, droughts, storms and wildfire. This is certainly what I and many other climate scientists have been warning about."
Kevin Trenberth, head of climate analysis at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in fire-charred Colorado, said these are the very record-breaking conditions he has said would happen, but many people wouldn't listen. So it's I told-you-so time, he said.
As recently as March, a special report an extreme events and disasters by the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned of "unprecedented extreme weather and climate events." Its lead author, Chris Field of the Carnegie Institution and Stanford University, said Monday, "It's really dramatic how many of the patterns that we've talked about as the expression of the extremes are hitting the U.S. right now."
"What we're seeing really is a window into what global warming really looks like," said Princeton University geosciences and international affairs professor Michael Oppenheimer. "It looks like heat. It looks like fires. It looks like this kind of environmental disasters."
Oppenheimer said that on Thursday. That was before the East Coast was hit with triple-digit temperatures and before a derecho — an unusually strong, long-lived and large straight-line wind storm — blew through Chicago to Washington. The storm and its aftermath killed more than 20 people and left millions without electricity. Experts say it had energy readings five times that of normal thunderstorms.
Fueled by the record high heat, this was one of the most powerful of this type of storm in the region in recent history, said research meteorologist Harold Brooks of the National Severe Storm Laboratory in Norman, Okla. Scientists expect "non-tornadic wind events" like this one and other thunderstorms to increase with climate change because of the heat and instability, he said.
Such patterns haven't happened only in the past week or two. The spring and winter in the U.S. were the warmest on record and among the least snowy, setting the stage for the weather extremes to come, scientists say.
Since Jan. 1, the United States has set more than 40,000 hot temperature records, but fewer than 6,000 cold temperature records, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Through most of last century, the U.S. used to set cold and hot records evenly, but in the first decade of this century America set two hot records for every cold one, said Jerry Meehl, a climate extreme expert at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. This year the ratio is about 7 hot to 1 cold. Some computer models say that ratio will hit 20-to-1 by midcentury, Meehl said.
"In the future you would expect larger, longer more intense heat waves and we've seen that in the last few summers," NOAA Climate Monitoring chief Derek Arndt said.
The 100-degree heat, drought, early snowpack melt and beetles waking from hibernation early to strip trees all combined to set the stage for the current unusual spread of wildfires in the West, said University of Montana ecosystems professor Steven Running, an expert on wildfires.
While at least 15 climate scientists told The Associated Press that this long hot U.S. summer is consistent with what is to be expected in global warming, history is full of such extremes, said John Christy at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. He's a global warming skeptic who says, "The guilty party in my view is Mother Nature."
But the vast majority of mainstream climate scientists, such as Meehl, disagree: "This is what global warming is like, and we'll see more of this as we go into the future."
 Quoting: MayanGod


jerkit bsflag so much bsflag
Anonymous Coward
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United States
07/05/2012 11:58 PM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
earths axis tilted just enough to cause some sort of change ? dead3
Bowyn Aerrow

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07/06/2012 12:19 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
I read that my part of the world would get a bit cooler, more rain in the summer with climate change.

Everyone thinks that global warming means every place is going to get hotter. Heat the the energy in the system, heat is what creates storms - cooling is the storm using up the energy.

When the Pacific warms up, setting up El Nino, we get more rain on the West Coast of the Americas and far less rain in those places that usually are tropical on the East side of Asia and Africa. Heat in the system does not mean hotter temperatures, it means climate shifts, rain falls shift, storms worsen, some places get hotter while others gets colder.

Frankly, with the lovely weather we have had here in California while the rest of the USA burns or toasts - if this is what Global Warming is bringing to us, I hope we get lots of global warming.
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Withwings

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07/06/2012 12:27 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
if it were GLOBAL warming it would be ALL over not just the USA Derrrrrrwhatever
I hate it when people say "We are not humans having a spiritual experience, we are spiritual beings having a human experience" Like, WTF does that change?
Anonymous Coward
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United States
07/06/2012 12:30 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
Maybe is just natural that planets eventually destroy themselves, ever think of that. If our planet is "alive" shouldnt it die?
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2012 12:41 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
2012 pole shift.
Evil_Twin

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07/06/2012 12:45 AM

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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
Hmmmm....weather is perfectly normal here. The temperature was 6 degrees higher in 1998.
Hellbilly
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07/06/2012 12:49 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
no such thing as global warming.. but there is such a thing as a pissed off sun..more planets than us will feel it ..and has nothing to do with us or global warming bullshit ..thats just funny . moran's at work for GLP
Anonymous Coward
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Australia
07/06/2012 12:50 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
Marxist lying fucks NWO shill bitches they need to be arrested and locked up
Anonymous Coward
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Australia
07/06/2012 12:51 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
I read that my part of the world would get a bit cooler, more rain in the summer with climate change.

Everyone thinks that global warming means every place is going to get hotter. Heat the the energy in the system, heat is what creates storms - cooling is the storm using up the energy.


 Quoting: Bowyn Aerrow


The climate always fucking changes idiot, every year it always has it always will what so we should have a world Marxist government and pay a breathing tax because of this?
Wake the fuck up fool you've been conned.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2012 12:51 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
Idiot
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2012 12:52 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
it's freezing in australia

i guess "global" must mean "USA"
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 19048689


yea this guy typed or pasted a lot of :


un·nec·es·sar·y/ˌənˈnesəˌserē/

Adjective:
Not needed.
Noun:
Unnecessary things.
Synonyms:
needless - superfluous - useless - redundant - otiose


Shit.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2012 01:00 AM
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Re: This US summer is 'what global warming looks like'
By Seth Borenstein a well known leftist shill liar who of course left out all the facts to promote his pathetic agenda.
[link to judithcurry.com]

In many (but not all) regions over the globe with sufficient data, there is medium confidence that the length or number of warm spells or heat waves has increased.
So not only is there no overwhelming evidence of an increase in the length or number of heat waves, the SREX does not attribute any of this to AGW. However, this does not prevent the SREX from predicting more numerous and severe heat waves in the future.

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