Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 1,479 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 704,536
Pageviews Today: 900,409Threads Today: 167Posts Today: 3,071
06:58 AM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

Breaking: CDC: All baby boomers should get tested for hepatitis-C virus

 
Switchblade
Offer Upgrade

User ID: 17824583
Canada
08/21/2012 03:11 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Breaking: CDC: All baby boomers should get tested for hepatitis-C virus
The CDC now recommends that all baby boomers, not just recipients of past blood transfusions or people who have injected illicit drugs, undergo testing for hepatitis C.

Late last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that it was finalizing a recommendation it had proposed earlier this year that all baby boomers undergo a one-time blood screening test to determine if they have a hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Before, the CDC advised only individuals with specific risk factors for an HCV infection, such as a history of receiving a blood transfusion or of injecting illicit drugs, to be tested.

An estimated 2.7 to 3.9 million adults are living with an HCV infection in the United States, and three-fourths of them were born between 1945 and 1965, according to the CDC. Most HCV-infected baby boomers contracted the virus, which is transmitted through blood, decades ago, but because the virus tends to produce no symptoms until the liver is significantly damaged, many boomers are unaware they're infected.


HCV attacks the liver, causing it to become inflamed. If not caught and treated early (and sometimes even when it is treated early), the infection can lead to serious illnesses, such as cirrhosis and liver cancer. More than 15,000 Americans — most of them baby boomers — die each year from hepatitis-C related illnesses, according to the CDC. HCV is also the leading cause of liver transplants in the United States.

Why are baby boomers at greater risk than later generations? The CDC cites several reasons: HCV wasn’t identified until the late 1980s, and it took until 1992 for scientists to develop a blood test for the virus. Since then, the spread of the virus through blood transfusions has been essentially eliminated. In addition, fewer drug addicts are becoming infected with HCV. That’s due in large part to the needle and syringe exchange programs that were launched in the 1980s in response to the AIDS epidemic.

Also, regulations regarding tattooing, body piercing and acupuncture — other risk factors for hepatitis C — are stricter today than they were several decades ago.

HCV can also be contracted through the sharing of personal care items that may inadvertently cause an exchange of blood, such as nail clippers, razors and toothbrushes, but the risk from such items is considered quite low.

HCV in Minnesota
“We support the [CDC] recommendation,” said Kristin Sweet, an epidemiologist at the Minnesota Department of Health, in a phone interview Monday. “This is in line with what we know about hepatitis C in Minnesota.”

“The median age for people with hepatitis C in Minnesota is 55, which puts it right in the middle” of the baby-boomer demographic, she added.


Source: Minnesota Department of Health
The median age for people with hepatitis C in Minnesota is 55.

The Minnesota Department of Health estimates that in 2011 about 37,000 Minnesotans had a current or past history of HCV infection. Of those, 35 percent lived in Minneapolis or St. Paul, 37 percent lived in outstate Minnesota, and 28 percent lived in suburban areas of the state.

“We don’t have as high a rate as other people in the country, but 37,000 people in our registry isn’t a small amount,” said Sweet.

In Minnesota, Native Americans and blacks are at greatest risk. Their HCV rates are more than five times greater than those for Hispanics or Asian-Americans and about 10 times greater than those for whites. National prevalence rates show somewhat smaller spreads among those demographic groups, but Sweet said any variations between national and Minnesota rates may be the result of differences in how communities across the country report and count cases of hepatitis.


[link to www.minnpost.com]
Unity is the great goal toward which humanity moves irresistibly. But it becomes fatal, destructive of the intelligence, the dignity, the well-being of individuals and peoples whenever it is formed without regard to liberty, either by violent means or under the authority of any theological, metaphysical, political, or even economic idea. That patriotism which tends toward unity without regard to liberty is an evil patriotism, always disastrous to the popular and real interests of the country it claims to exalt and serve. Often, without wishing to be so, it is a friend of reaction – an enemy of the revolution, i.e., the emancipation of nations and men.
-Mikhail Bakunin-
Switchblade (OP)

User ID: 17824583
Canada
08/28/2012 11:57 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: CDC: All baby boomers should get tested for hepatitis-C virus
bump
Unity is the great goal toward which humanity moves irresistibly. But it becomes fatal, destructive of the intelligence, the dignity, the well-being of individuals and peoples whenever it is formed without regard to liberty, either by violent means or under the authority of any theological, metaphysical, political, or even economic idea. That patriotism which tends toward unity without regard to liberty is an evil patriotism, always disastrous to the popular and real interests of the country it claims to exalt and serve. Often, without wishing to be so, it is a friend of reaction – an enemy of the revolution, i.e., the emancipation of nations and men.
-Mikhail Bakunin-

News








We're dropping truth bombs like it's the end of days!