Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 2,490 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 1,407,254
Pageviews Today: 2,206,813Threads Today: 543Posts Today: 12,158
09:09 PM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again

 
Mr. Asker
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:13 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Why is Rosh Hashanah (head of the year) the beginning of the year for the jewish people even though in God’s incorruptible word, the Holy Bible, it is referred to as the 7th Month and not the first of anything except the fall season.

The Holy Bible says that the Jubilee years are to be declared on the 10th day of the 7th month (Day of Atonement).

So why is the New Year Declared on the 1st day of the 7th month, which is contrary to what God told Moses?

In other words….is there evidence of a civil calendar in the bible? A calendar which starts the new year on the 7th month, in which case it would not be referred to the 7th month, instead it would be the 1st? Chapter and Verse please?

If not, then who’s idea was it to change the new year every 1st day of the 7th month? Any Names of the person who started a tradition instead of staying on the course of biblical facts?
bus
User ID: 23830578
United States
09/17/2012 01:16 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
That is a great question.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:18 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Why is Rosh Hashanah (head of the year) the beginning of the year for the jewish people even though in God’s incorruptible word, the Holy Bible, it is referred to as the 7th Month and not the first of anything except the fall season.

The Holy Bible says that the Jubilee years are to be declared on the 10th day of the 7th month (Day of Atonement).

So why is the New Year Declared on the 1st day of the 7th month, which is contrary to what God told Moses?

In other words….is there evidence of a civil calendar in the bible? A calendar which starts the new year on the 7th month, in which case it would not be referred to the 7th month, instead it would be the 1st? Chapter and Verse please?

If not, then who’s idea was it to change the new year every 1st day of the 7th month? Any Names of the person who started a tradition instead of staying on the course of biblical facts?
 Quoting: Mr. Asker 23660256


Correction: Not Moses, (what GOD told Noah after the flood)
mopar28m
Rom. 3:31

User ID: 14265444
United States
09/17/2012 01:19 AM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Its according to the Talmud that Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year.

According to the biblical observed calendar, the calendar that is laid out in the bible, the new year begins in the Spring after the aviv barley has been sighted in the promised land.
vaccinefreehealth.spam

vaccinefreehealth@hushmail.com

Racin​g to end vaccinations.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:21 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Its according to the Talmud that Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year.

According to the biblical observed calendar, the calendar that is laid out in the bible, the new year begins in the Spring after the aviv barley has been sighted in the promised land.
 Quoting: mopar28m


Ok?............is the talmud biblical? Chapter and Verse otherwise I call BS.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:22 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Someone show me in the bible where it says something similar to the following:

You shall have a civil calendar and on the first day of the 7th month of the Religious Calendar you shall declare the new year.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:25 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Well??????
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1358798
United States
09/17/2012 01:26 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
From Wikipedia

The Jewish calendar is a lunisolar calendar, or fixed lunar year, based on twelve lunar months of twenty-nine or thirty days, with an intercalary lunar month added seven times every nineteen years (once every two to three years) to synchronize the twelve lunar cycles with the slightly longer solar year. Each Jewish lunar month starts with the new moon. Although originally the new lunar crescent had to be observed and certified by witnesses, the moment of the new moon is now approximated arithmetically.
Concurrently there is a weekly cycle of seven days, mirroring the seven-day period of the Book of Genesis in which the world is created. The names for the days of the week, like those in the Creation account, are simply the day number within the week, with Shabbat being the seventh day. The Jewish day always runs from sunset to the next sunset; the formal adjustments used to specify a standard time and time zones are not relevant to the Jewish calendar.
The twelve regular months are: Nisan (30 days), Iyar (29 days), Sivan (30 days), Tammuz (29 days), Av (30 days), Elul (29 days), Tishrei (30 days), Marcheshvan (29 or 30 days), Kislev (29 or 30 days), Tevet (29 days), Shevat (30 days), and Adar (29 days). In the leap years (such as 5771) an additional month, Adar I (30 days) is added after Shevat, and the regular Adar is referred to as "Adar II".
The first month of the festival year is Nisan. 15 Nisan is the start of the festival of Passover, corresponding to the full moon of Nisan. Passover is a spring festival associated with the barley harvest,[3] so the leap-month mentioned above is intercalated periodically to keep this festival in the northern hemisphere's spring season. Since the adoption of a fixed calendar, intercalations in the Hebrew calendar have been at fixed points in a 19-year cycle. Prior to this, the intercalation was determined empirically:
The year may be intercalated on three grounds: 'aviv [i.e.the ripeness of barley], fruits of trees, and the equinox. On two of these grounds it should be intercalated, but not on one of them alone.[4]
The Bible designates Nisan, which it calls Aviv (Exodus 13:4), as the first month of the year (Exodus 12:2). At the same time, the season of the fall Festival of Booths (Sukkoth), is called "the end of the year" (Exodus 23:16). The Sabbatical year in which the land was to lie fallow, necessarily began at the time the winter barley and winter wheat would have been sown, in the fall.[citation needed] The Gezer calendar, an Israelite or Canaanite inscription c. 900 BCE, also begins in the fall.[5]
Modern practice follows the scheme described in the Mishnah: Nisan is the new year for the reigns of kings and the festivals. Rosh Hashanah, which means "the head of the year", and is celebrated in the month of Tishrei, is "the new year for the counting of years."[6] This is when the numbered year changes, which is most significant for determining the Shemittah and Yovel years.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1358798
United States
09/17/2012 01:27 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Biblical references to the pre-Jewish calendar include ten months identified by number rather than by name. In parts of the Torah portion Noach ("Noah") (specifically, Gen 7:11, Gen 8:3-4, Gen 8:13-14) it is implied that the months are thirty days long.[20] There is also indication that there were twelve months in the annual cycle (1Kin 4:7, 1Chr 27:1-15).
Many countries in the western Asian region used the Mesopotamian calendar from very early times, though the names of months varied.[13] Prior to the Babylonian exile, the names of only four months are referred to in the Tanakh:
Aviv - first month - literally "spring" (Exodus 12:2, 13:4, 23:15, 34:18, Deut. 16:1);
Ziv - second month - literally "light" (1 Kings 6:1, 6:37);
Ethanim - seventh month - literally "strong" in plural, perhaps referring to strong rains (1 Kings 8:2); and
Bul - eighth month (1 Kings 6:38).
All of these are believed to be Canaanite names, and at least two are Phoenician (Northern Canaanite).[citation needed]
During the Babylonian exile, which started in 586 BCE, Babylonian month names were adopted, which are still in use.[13] The Syrian calendar used in the Levant region shares many of the names for months as the Hebrew calendar, such as Nisan, Iyyar, Tammuz, Ab, Elul, Tishri, and Adar, indicating a common Babylonian origin.
Hebrew names and romanized transliteration may somewhat differ, as they do for חשוון / Marcheshvan or כסלו / Kislev: the Hebrew words shown here are those commonly indicated e.g. in newspapers.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:29 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
From Wikipedia

The Jewish calendar is a lunisolar calendar, or fixed lunar year, based on twelve lunar months of twenty-nine or thirty days, with an intercalary lunar month added seven times every nineteen years (once every two to three years) to synchronize the twelve lunar cycles with the slightly longer solar year. Each Jewish lunar month starts with the new moon. Although originally the new lunar crescent had to be observed and certified by witnesses, the moment of the new moon is now approximated arithmetically.
Concurrently there is a weekly cycle of seven days, mirroring the seven-day period of the Book of Genesis in which the world is created. The names for the days of the week, like those in the Creation account, are simply the day number within the week, with Shabbat being the seventh day. The Jewish day always runs from sunset to the next sunset; the formal adjustments used to specify a standard time and time zones are not relevant to the Jewish calendar.
The twelve regular months are: Nisan (30 days), Iyar (29 days), Sivan (30 days), Tammuz (29 days), Av (30 days), Elul (29 days), Tishrei (30 days), Marcheshvan (29 or 30 days), Kislev (29 or 30 days), Tevet (29 days), Shevat (30 days), and Adar (29 days). In the leap years (such as 5771) an additional month, Adar I (30 days) is added after Shevat, and the regular Adar is referred to as "Adar II".
The first month of the festival year is Nisan. 15 Nisan is the start of the festival of Passover, corresponding to the full moon of Nisan. Passover is a spring festival associated with the barley harvest,[3] so the leap-month mentioned above is intercalated periodically to keep this festival in the northern hemisphere's spring season. Since the adoption of a fixed calendar, intercalations in the Hebrew calendar have been at fixed points in a 19-year cycle. Prior to this, the intercalation was determined empirically:
The year may be intercalated on three grounds: 'aviv [i.e.the ripeness of barley], fruits of trees, and the equinox. On two of these grounds it should be intercalated, but not on one of them alone.[4]
The Bible designates Nisan, which it calls Aviv (Exodus 13:4), as the first month of the year (Exodus 12:2). At the same time, the season of the fall Festival of Booths (Sukkoth), is called "the end of the year" (Exodus 23:16). The Sabbatical year in which the land was to lie fallow, necessarily began at the time the winter barley and winter wheat would have been sown, in the fall.[citation needed] The Gezer calendar, an Israelite or Canaanite inscription c. 900 BCE, also begins in the fall.[5]
Modern practice follows the scheme described in the Mishnah: Nisan is the new year for the reigns of kings and the festivals. Rosh Hashanah, which means "the head of the year", and is celebrated in the month of Tishrei, is "the new year for the counting of years."[6] This is when the numbered year changes, which is most significant for determining the Shemittah and Yovel years.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1358798


Thanks for the secular info......however I Hold the bible to be the ultimate authority, so Chapter and Verse Please?
mopar28m
Rom. 3:31

User ID: 14265444
United States
09/17/2012 01:29 AM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Its according to the Talmud that Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year.

According to the biblical observed calendar, the calendar that is laid out in the bible, the new year begins in the Spring after the aviv barley has been sighted in the promised land.
 Quoting: mopar28m


Ok?............is the talmud biblical? Chapter and Verse otherwise I call BS.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 23660256


No, the Talmud is NOT biblical. It doesn't follow scripture at all.

Some of the Jewish sects put the Talmud above the bible which is wrong in & of itself.
vaccinefreehealth.spam

vaccinefreehealth@hushmail.com

Racin​g to end vaccinations.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:31 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Its according to the Talmud that Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year.

According to the biblical observed calendar, the calendar that is laid out in the bible, the new year begins in the Spring after the aviv barley has been sighted in the promised land.
 Quoting: mopar28m


Ok?............is the talmud biblical? Chapter and Verse otherwise I call BS.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 23660256


No, the Talmud is NOT biblical. It doesn't follow scripture at all.

Some of the Jewish sects put the Talmud above the bible which is wrong in & of itself.
 Quoting: mopar28m


Thank you!!!!!

Case Closed!

Rosh Hashana is not head of the year becaues a civil calendar cannot be found in the Holy Bible!


Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The traditions of man,,I tell ya......
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:33 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
bump

For awarness that only on the 10th day of the 7th month is a jubilee supposed to be declared at it's proper year.

No "head of the year" BS. Unbiblical.

Otherwise, chapter and verse?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1358798
United States
09/17/2012 01:36 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Rosh Hashanah postponement
Day of week Number of days
Monday 353 355 383 385
Tuesday 354 384
Thursday 354 355 383 385
Saturday 353 355 383 385
To calculate the day on which Rosh Hashanah falls, it is necessary to first calculate the molad (lunar conjunction or new moon) of Tishrei, and then determine whether the start of the year must be postponed. The molad can be calculated by multiplying the mean length of a lunar month (29 days, 12 hours, and 793 parts) by the elapsed time since another molad whose weekday is known. (There are 1080 "parts" in an hour, making one part equal to 31/3 seconds.) The molad tohu began 2 days, 5 hours, and 204 parts after the beginning of the week.
The rules are complicated by the fact that the months subject to adjustment, Marcheshvan and Kislev, are the eighth and ninth months of the ecclesiastical year while Tishrei is the seventh month. This means that adjustments must be made in one year in anticipation of the day of the week on which Rosh Hashanah will fall in the next year, which may itself be affected by the day on which it will fall in the third year, and so on. The process is further complicated by the need to insert leap months in accordance with their own cycle.
Nevertheless, only four possible adjustments are needed. These are called the Rosh Hashanah postponement rules, or deḥiyyot:[56]
If the molad occurs at or later than 18 hours, Rosh Hashanah is postponed a day. This is called deḥiyyah molad zaken, meaning an "old conjunction."
If the molad occurs on a Sunday, Wednesday, or Friday, Rosh Hashanah is postponed a day. If deḥiyyah molad zaken places Rosh Hashanah on one of these days, it is postponed a second day. This is called deḥiyyah lo ADU, an acronym meaning "not one, four, or six."
The first of these (deḥiyyah molad zaken) is thought to be a relic of when the calendar was established empirically (although there is some doubt); the second (deḥiyyah lo ADU) is applied for religious reasons.[57]
The last two rules are applied much less frequently and exist to prevent illegal year lengths. Because they apply to the molad, they are never used if another postponement is made. Their names are Hebrew acronyms for the way they are calculated:
If the molad in a common year falls on a Tuesday after 9 hours and 204 parts, Rosh Hashanah is postponed to Thursday. This is deḥiyyah GaTaRaD, an acronym meaning "3 (Tuesday), 9, 204."
If the molad following a leap year falls on a Monday after 15 hours and 589 parts, Rosh Hashanah is postponed to Tuesday. This is deḥiyyah BeTUTeKaPoT, and acronym for "2 (Monday), 15, 589."
At the innovation of the rabbis, the mathematical calendar has been arranged to ensure that Yom Kippur does not fall on a Friday or Sunday, and Hoshana Rabbah does not fall on Shabbat.[58] These rules have been instituted because Shabbat restrictions also apply to Yom Kippur, so that if Yom Kippur were to fall on Friday, it would not be possible to make necessary preparations for Shabbat (such as candle lighting). Similarly, if Yom Kippur fell on a Sunday, it would not be possible to make preparations for Yom Kippur because the preceding day is Shabbat.[59] Additionally, the laws of Shabbat override those of Hoshana Rabbah, so that if Hoshana Rabbah were to fall on Shabbat certain rituals that are a part of the Hoshana Rabbah service (such as carrying willows, which is a form of work) could not be performed.[60]
To prevent Yom Kippur (10 Tishrei) from falling on a Friday or Sunday, Rosh Hashanah (1 Tishrei) cannot be a Wednesday or Friday. Likewise, to prevent Hoshana Rabbah (21 Tishrei) from falling on a Saturday, Rosh Hashanah cannot be a Sunday. This leaves only four days on which Rosh Hashanah can fall: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, which are referred as the "four gates." Each day is associated with a number (its order in the week, starting with Sunday as 1), and these numbers are associated with Hebrew letters. Therefore the keviyah uses the letters ה,ג,ב and ז (representing 2, 3, 5, and 7, for Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday) to denote the starting day of the year.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:38 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Rosh Hashanah postponement
Day of week Number of days
Monday 353 355 383 385
Tuesday 354 384
Thursday 354 355 383 385
Saturday 353 355 383 385
To calculate the day on which Rosh Hashanah falls, it is necessary to first calculate the molad (lunar conjunction or new moon) of Tishrei, and then determine whether the start of the year must be postponed. The molad can be calculated by multiplying the mean length of a lunar month (29 days, 12 hours, and 793 parts) by the elapsed time since another molad whose weekday is known. (There are 1080 "parts" in an hour, making one part equal to 31/3 seconds.) The molad tohu began 2 days, 5 hours, and 204 parts after the beginning of the week.
The rules are complicated by the fact that the months subject to adjustment, Marcheshvan and Kislev, are the eighth and ninth months of the ecclesiastical year while Tishrei is the seventh month. This means that adjustments must be made in one year in anticipation of the day of the week on which Rosh Hashanah will fall in the next year, which may itself be affected by the day on which it will fall in the third year, and so on. The process is further complicated by the need to insert leap months in accordance with their own cycle.
Nevertheless, only four possible adjustments are needed. These are called the Rosh Hashanah postponement rules, or deḥiyyot:[56]
If the molad occurs at or later than 18 hours, Rosh Hashanah is postponed a day. This is called deḥiyyah molad zaken, meaning an "old conjunction."
If the molad occurs on a Sunday, Wednesday, or Friday, Rosh Hashanah is postponed a day. If deḥiyyah molad zaken places Rosh Hashanah on one of these days, it is postponed a second day. This is called deḥiyyah lo ADU, an acronym meaning "not one, four, or six."
The first of these (deḥiyyah molad zaken) is thought to be a relic of when the calendar was established empirically (although there is some doubt); the second (deḥiyyah lo ADU) is applied for religious reasons.[57]
The last two rules are applied much less frequently and exist to prevent illegal year lengths. Because they apply to the molad, they are never used if another postponement is made. Their names are Hebrew acronyms for the way they are calculated:
If the molad in a common year falls on a Tuesday after 9 hours and 204 parts, Rosh Hashanah is postponed to Thursday. This is deḥiyyah GaTaRaD, an acronym meaning "3 (Tuesday), 9, 204."
If the molad following a leap year falls on a Monday after 15 hours and 589 parts, Rosh Hashanah is postponed to Tuesday. This is deḥiyyah BeTUTeKaPoT, and acronym for "2 (Monday), 15, 589."
At the innovation of the rabbis, the mathematical calendar has been arranged to ensure that Yom Kippur does not fall on a Friday or Sunday, and Hoshana Rabbah does not fall on Shabbat.[58] These rules have been instituted because Shabbat restrictions also apply to Yom Kippur, so that if Yom Kippur were to fall on Friday, it would not be possible to make necessary preparations for Shabbat (such as candle lighting). Similarly, if Yom Kippur fell on a Sunday, it would not be possible to make preparations for Yom Kippur because the preceding day is Shabbat.[59] Additionally, the laws of Shabbat override those of Hoshana Rabbah, so that if Hoshana Rabbah were to fall on Shabbat certain rituals that are a part of the Hoshana Rabbah service (such as carrying willows, which is a form of work) could not be performed.[60]
To prevent Yom Kippur (10 Tishrei) from falling on a Friday or Sunday, Rosh Hashanah (1 Tishrei) cannot be a Wednesday or Friday. Likewise, to prevent Hoshana Rabbah (21 Tishrei) from falling on a Saturday, Rosh Hashanah cannot be a Sunday. This leaves only four days on which Rosh Hashanah can fall: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, which are referred as the "four gates." Each day is associated with a number (its order in the week, starting with Sunday as 1), and these numbers are associated with Hebrew letters. Therefore the keviyah uses the letters ה,ג,ב and ז (representing 2, 3, 5, and 7, for Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday) to denote the starting day of the year.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1358798


Chapter and Verse Buddy.

Otherwise quit trolling.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1358798
United States
09/17/2012 01:39 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Biblical and Talmudic units of measurement, such as the Omer, used primarily by ancient Israelites, appear frequently within the Hebrew Bible as well as in later Judaic scripture, such as the Mishnah and Talmud. These units of measurement are still an important part of Jewish life today. There is much debate within Judaism, as well as by outside scholars, about the exact relationship between measurements in the system and those in other measurement systems, such as the International Standard Units system used in almost all parts of world except the USA, and in modern scientific writing. Classical statements, such as that an Etzba was seven barleycorns laid side by side, or that a Log was equal to six medium-sized eggs, are so indefinite and vague as to be nearly useless. Nevertheless, the entire system of measurement corresponds almost exactly with the Babylonian system, and in all probability the Israelite measurement system was derived from the Babylonian, with some lesser level of influence from the Egyptian system.[1] It may therefore be assumed that the relationship between the Israelite measurements and SI units is the same as the relationship between the Babylonian system and SI Units.[1]

Year
Main article: Hebrew calendar
The Hebrew calendar is a lunar calendar synchronised with the seasons by intercalation, i.e. a lunisolar calendar. There are thus 12 ordinary months plus an intercalary month. The months originally had very descriptive names, such as Ziv (meaning light) and Ethanim (meaning strong, perhaps in the sense of strong rain - i.e. monsoon), with Canaanite origins, but after the Babylonian captivity, the names were changed to the ones used by the Babylonians. With the Babylonian naming, the intercalary month has no special name of its own, and is merely referred to as Adar I, the following month being Adar/Adar II (in the Babylonian calendar, it was Adar II that was considered to be the intercalary month).
[edit]Week
The Israelite month was clearly broken up into weeks, since the Genesis creation (and biblical references to Shabbat) describe a seven day week. The seven-day cycle is not seen as a cycle in nature and is rather a custom biblically originating from Genesis 1:3-2:3.
The Hebrew calendar follows a seven-day weekly cycle, which runs concurrently but independently of the monthly and annual cycles. The names for the days of the week are simply the day number within the week. In Hebrew, these names may be abbreviated using the numerical value of the Hebrew letters, for example "Day 1, or Yom Rishon".
[edit]Day
In addition to "tomorrow" (machar) and "yesterday" (etmol), the Israelite vocabulary also contained a distinct word for two days ago (shilshom). Maḥaratayim ("the day after tomorrow"), is a dual form of machar, literally "two tomorrows". In the Bible, the day is divided up vaguely, with descriptions such as midnight, and half-night.[17][18][19] Nevertheless, it is clear that the day was considered to start at dusk.
By Talmudic times, the Babylonian system of dividing up the day (from sunset to sunrise, and sunrise to sunset), into hours (Hebrew: שעה, sha'ah), parts (Hebrew: חלק, heleq, plural halaqim), and moments (Hebrew: רגע, rega, plural rega'im), had been adopted; the relationship of these units was:
1 part (heleq) = 76 moments (rega'im) (each moment, rega, is 0.04386 of a second; 22.8 rega'im is 1 second)
1 hour (sha'ah) = 1080 parts (halaqim) (each heleq is 3⅓ seconds)
1 day = 24 hours (sha'ah)
To complicate matters, Halakha states that there is always 12 hours between sunrise and sunset, so these measurements are averages. For example, in the summer, a day time hour is much longer than a night time hour.
mopar28m
Rom. 3:31

User ID: 14265444
United States
09/17/2012 01:40 AM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
According to the biblical observed calendar, the calendar that is laid out in the bible, the new year begins in the Spring after the aviv barley has been sighted in the promised land.
 Quoting: mopar28m

Ok?............is the talmud biblical? Chapter and Verse otherwise I call BS.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 23660256

No, the Talmud is NOT biblical. It doesn't follow scripture at all.

Some of the Jewish sects put the Talmud above the bible which is wrong in & of itself.
 Quoting: mopar28m

Thank you!!!!!

Case Closed!

Rosh Hashana is not head of the year becaues a civil calendar cannot be found in the Holy Bible!

Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The traditions of man,,I tell ya......
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 23660256


BUT, there is a calendar laid out in the bible. Ex. 12:2 - this month (chodesh - new moon) shall be the beginning of your months. This was stated after the barley had been destroyed by hail.

So after the ripened barley has been spotted in Israel, the following new moon (chodesh, first sliver) starts the new year. From there you start counting to the first festivals of the new year according to Lev. 23.
vaccinefreehealth.spam

vaccinefreehealth@hushmail.com

Racin​g to end vaccinations.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:43 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
...

Ok?............is the talmud biblical? Chapter and Verse otherwise I call BS.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 23660256

No, the Talmud is NOT biblical. It doesn't follow scripture at all.

Some of the Jewish sects put the Talmud above the bible which is wrong in & of itself.
 Quoting: mopar28m

Thank you!!!!!

Case Closed!

Rosh Hashana is not head of the year becaues a civil calendar cannot be found in the Holy Bible!

Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The traditions of man,,I tell ya......
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 23660256


BUT, there is a calendar laid out in the bible. Ex. 12:2 - this month (chodesh - new moon) shall be the beginning of your months. This was stated after the barley had been destroyed by hail.

So after the ripened barley has been spotted in Israel, the following new moon (chodesh, first sliver) starts the new year. From there you start counting to the first festivals of the new year according to Lev. 23.
 Quoting: mopar28m


Yes, I'm aware of this all too well.

Thank you.

So basically, we've been in the year 5993 since this spring. I actually think it's a different year, but I won't get into that.

The topic is: Is there evidense of a civil calendar in the bible? Chapter and verse?
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 01:44 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Correction 5773
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 02:03 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
Can you please Rosh my Codesh? thank you.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 23660256
United States
09/17/2012 03:53 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Breaking: Rosh Hashana New Year? Think again
jihad