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Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 3558872
United States
09/21/2012 03:36 PM
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Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
I had a logo commissioned by an artist, at a great price, only to find out (contract has not been completed) that they do vector graphics and not detailed photoshop style graphics. So, the detail I required in the logo will not be present. Though, I am wondering if detail is necessary as the logo is going on a web site.

For those that are perhaps in the know, as far as a business logo is concerned, should vector graphics be used over a bitmap style graphic? Does it matter, thoughts? Thanks!
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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09/21/2012 03:44 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
bump
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1303612
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09/21/2012 03:47 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
There's no reason you can't get detail in a vector graphic. The main reason for a vector is if the image is ever enlarged it doesn't lose it's resolution. With a bitmap image if you try to make it bigger chances are it will lose detail and resolution and appear grainy. If you are doing the logo for web only then a low res would be OK but for printed graphics no way.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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09/21/2012 03:52 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
There's no reason you can't get detail in a vector graphic. The main reason for a vector is if the image is ever enlarged it doesn't lose it's resolution. With a bitmap image if you try to make it bigger chances are it will lose detail and resolution and appear grainy. If you are doing the logo for web only then a low res would be OK but for printed graphics no way.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1303612


Well the logo would be used for both. I am being told that high detail images such as this:

(as an example)

[link to www.hispanicmpr.com]


Is not possible in vector. Is that true?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 300884
Sweden
09/21/2012 04:23 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
Pros always use vector for logos and such. It's much better.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1303612
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09/21/2012 04:26 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
There's no reason you can't get detail in a vector graphic. The main reason for a vector is if the image is ever enlarged it doesn't lose it's resolution. With a bitmap image if you try to make it bigger chances are it will lose detail and resolution and appear grainy. If you are doing the logo for web only then a low res would be OK but for printed graphics no way.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1303612


Well the logo would be used for both. I am being told that high detail images such as this:

(as an example)

[link to www.hispanicmpr.com]


Is not possible in vector. Is that true?

It is possible in vector, it's just text. I use a program called Adobe Streamline that will take a logo such as that and turn it into a vector image. Otherwise, you can bring the image into Illustrator and using the pen tool trace it out to recreate a vector image.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 3558872
SE

User ID: 1673157
Canada
09/21/2012 04:38 PM

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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
You really do want your logo in VECTOR!

Vector, as mentioned won't lose resolution as its "print size" is increased.

Vector is also best for most vehicle labeling applications.

Vector images are easily 'rasterized' into graphics types that you can use for computer graphics applications like web or docs.

However, that being said, the resizing quality-loss problem can be overcome in raster (jpeg, tiff, bitmap type and more) by producing the original with very high DPI (dots per inch, like 1200 dpi, 2400 dpi or 4800 dpi). This task can only be done properly at the time of the images creation.

As a comparison example, 72 to 96 dpi is typical for most of the graphics you will ever see on your monitor.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 20190047
United States
09/21/2012 04:41 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
The help troll strikes again.

please learn to use google.

The graphic that you claim is too difficult is childsplay.

see for yourself

[link to www.xara.com]

iamwith
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 6728935
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09/21/2012 04:44 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
You always want your logo in vector. I would question anyone who says otherwise. You can easily import your vector into Photoshop or a raster program if you want to add more detail, but keep in mind the best and most effective logos are usually the simplest. Stay away from textures and shadows and silly 3d effects and too many colors. Simplicity is the key to good design and communication. Take a look at the best and most recognizable brands out there. Coke, Apple, FedEx etc. Very simply yet very effective.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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09/21/2012 04:57 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
You always want your logo in vector. I would question anyone who says otherwise. You can easily import your vector into Photoshop or a raster program if you want to add more detail, but keep in mind the best and most effective logos are usually the simplest. Stay away from textures and shadows and silly 3d effects and too many colors. Simplicity is the key to good design and communication. Take a look at the best and most recognizable brands out there. Coke, Apple, FedEx etc. Very simply yet very effective.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 6728935


Thanks! I hear you, trying to convince a woman is another question... ;)
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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09/21/2012 04:59 PM
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Re: Questions on Vector Graphics vs Graphics done in Photoshop
Women like things too complicated and "pretty" or so I have noticed... ;)

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