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Got A Zombie Story ...

 
Turtles Voice
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09/25/2012 06:15 PM

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Got A Zombie Story ...
...who wants to help me finish it, lol.

I write. And sometimes stories begin with a bang and then they fizzle out - so frustrating. So I'll post a bit of one of my zombie stories (zombies are about to go out of style like men's chest hair and pantaloons) and it seems I can't finish any of them in time to meet the craze, lol.

Anyway, this one is just labeled Rotten and if anyone has any ideas, finds it interesting or even wants to finish it .... lol.


This is the first bit 3 or 49 (I think)





“You’re all idiots!” He exclaimed and kicked an empty box into the corner. He straightened his LL Bean denim shirt, and tugged at the waistband of his Abercrombie jeans. “No one here knows what the fuck they are talking about and no one here can even speak in a simply constructed sentence! You’re all fucking idiots!”

We laughed. I mean really. I elbowed Rotten in the ribs and I swear, I snorted a bit as I giggled. So freaking unladylike, but damn! We saved his ass, his designer-clothed ass! Of course, we knew what we were saying, he just couldn’t hear us.

“Dude, have you not heard the recent news?” Rotten wiped the tears from his eyes and grew serious. “Remember the guy that cut himself open and threw his guts at the cops? I know you remember that, it was freakin’ everywhere, man. CNN, FOX, ABC, and on and on! What the fuck? Even that stupid morning show with all those chicks talked about it. Oh, and the other guy that took out six cops by bouncing over rooftops in Pinecrest Estates. He bounced, man! He didn’t climb or struggle. They tasered that bastard six fucking times and guess what?” Rotten took a breath and took four steps in Professor Sully Kingswood’s direction. “He bounced fucking away, man! He fucking bounced!!

“Listen, man!” Rotten stepped closer. “You ain’t been payin’ attention. You ain’t been reading.” He took another step, the space between them reduced to a good eighteen inches. “I freakin’ know you teach English and all that shit, but you ain’t been reading! You know, some freaking guy from 1846 ain’t gonna tell you what’s happening out your own fuckin’ window. He just ain’t, man, and you gotta get that shit in your head real quick.”

Rotten stepped away. I was impressed, not because I don’t know what a gentle guy Rotten is (despite the name), we were freaked! Scared shitless, would be a good term. Wanting to get in the fetal position and beg for your mom to come save you is actually a more descriptive truth.

Professor Kingswood is our professor and simply happenstance found him in our presence when it started going down. We were out celebrating Princess’s first art sale. Her painting went for three hundred bucks and spending a third of that on her friends celebrating her accomplishment was why she called us.

I was taking the day off from school, laying in bed and depressed. I’m usually depressed; it’s just my nature. My favorite character in Winnie the Pooh was Eeyore because I got him. I understood. So laying in bed and crying over the most recent heartbreak was not new to me. This time I was crying over Lionel. I know, stupid name, but cute boy.

Anyway, Princess called and asked if I’d meet her at Club 13. I didn’t want to, but I work hard to maintain relationships despite my depressive ways, so I agreed to go. Princess also called Rotten, Moonshine and Highland. Now, with these odd names, and before I introduce my own, I feel the need to explain. Rotten was born Reginald Owen Tannenbaum, you know, his initials spelled ROT, so Rotten he became somewhere between 7th and 8th grade. Moonshine earned his when we met him as the new kid in the school in 9th grade. His name is Michael Smith, sorta funny, huh? Just Michael Smith. But he came from backwoods Tennessee and the first time we all got together after 6th period gym, he had good ole’ Tennessee moonshine. Ever since that day in Highland’s basement, Michael Smith was called Moonshine.

And then there’s Highland. His name came because he insisted we not call him Wayne, but that we call him by his Internet identity. His last name is Williams and he won’t admit to having a middle. He’s an odd bird, useful with his computer prowess, but too quiet for my liking.

And Princess and I got the worst of it. Her name is actually Princess, I’ve seen her birth certificate, and my name is Dove. It really is. I wish I had a nickname, but you know, folks like Michael, Reginald and Wayne get nicknames, while girls like Princess and Dove have to suffer. I met Princess in the 4th grade, we were nerdy, chubby and read too much to be cool. By 8th grade we were thinner and Goth and by graduation we were too thin and cynical.

In those years, despites heartbreaks and disappointments, the five of us bonded. We’re all a bit artistic. Princess paints, I write, Rotten can play any instrument you put in his hand and Moonshine can wittle or carve or build anything you would ever need built. Highland is our resource guy – he can find anything on the web or hack into where you need info. If you need something, Highland can find it, find it quick, somehow pay for it and have it delivered to your door within a day or two. I don’t know how he does it and I don’t ask questions, something in his demeanor repels questions.

“You need to chill your ass out!” Princess stood up from where she’d been crouched and crying in the corner. “I just saw two of my fuckin’ friends get killed so you just shut the fuck up.” She stomped on four-inch platform shoes across the dusty warehouse floor and settled against the wall outside of the glow of the streetlights streaming in the windows.

“Did you see how fast those fuckers move? We’re doomed.” Moonshine paced and rubbed his face.

“We’re not doomed,” Highland spoke quietly from his position by the window. “We just need a plan to get out of the city.”

“How are we gonna get past those things?” Moonshine demanded. “We don’t have any weapons.”

“We’re going to sit here, watch them, and figure it out.”

“This ain’t one of your video games, Highland, this is real.”

Highland looked down at the bloodstains on his shirt. “I know it’s real, dude. I was there too, you know.”

“What are you thinking, Highland?” Rotten asked.

“We just need to lay low and watch for a while, find their weaknesses and figure out our strengths.”

“I sure as hell didn’t see any weaknesses when they disemboweled Heather,” Moonshine said and joined Highland at the windows.

I stepped over to the window and looked down at the street to see the chaos. People ran in every direction and the only way you could tell the normals from the infected was the lack of blood on their clothes and the speed in which they moved. As we watched we saw a girl in heels being taken down and attacked by a man in hospital scrubs.

“First rule,” Highland said, looking over his shoulder at Princess and focusing on her feet, “good shoes. You can’t run in those shoes, Princess.”

“Well, forgive me,” Princess snapped. “I didn’t know the zombie apocalypse was going to start tonight.”

“We should have known,” Rotten said. “We should have known. All the weird stories on the news, the new vaccine they’ve been pushing for the fatal flu sweeping the country, the newscasters suddenly losing it on TV and speaking in gibberish, as their eyes rolled back in their heads – for anyone who’s watched a zombie movie, all the clues were there.”

“You people are insane,” Professor Kingswood said. “There are no zombies.”

“Oh, really? What would you call them?” Rotten asked.

“Sick. It’s just some sort of mental illness or neurological disorder, zombies don’t exist.”

“Tell that to Heather, asshole!” Princess got to her feet, walked to the bank of windows, and looked down at the street. “Tell that to the woman down being eaten by a doctor.”

“How’s that vaccine working for you, doc?” Moonshine muttered, as he watched the man pull away from the bloodied woman and wander off down the street. The woman sat up on the sidewalk and jumped to her feet with the agility of a gymnast and followed behind him, leaving a trail of blood on the concrete. “That’s ain’t no mental illness, Professor. That’s a fucking zombie if I’ve ever seen one.”

“Seen a lot of zombies have you, Michael?” Professor Kingswood sat down on a wooden crate and rubbed his face.

“As of a couple hours ago, yes,” Moonshine said.

Last Edited by Turtles Voice on 10/16/2012 05:39 PM
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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Turtles Voice (OP)
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09/25/2012 06:28 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
“Ignore him,” Highland said. “He’s in shock. I guess we all are, but at least we’ve discussed the scenario before, kinda half expecting it since we were kids.”

“Yeah, remember when we used to make our bug-out zombie plans?” Rotten asked.

“Yeah,” I said. “But that was years ago and our plan usually revolved around us being in the old neighborhood when it went down, not stuck in the city.” I was beginning to think Moonshine was right and we were doomed.

Rotten turned from the window and looked around the room, seeking weapons. “There has to be something here that we can use to protect ourselves.”

“We should just call the police and wait for them to help,” Professor Kingswood said.

“If the police were going to help don’t you think we’d see some of them down there?” Princess asked.

“I think we can take it as a given that we’re on our own,” Highland agreed.

Rotten kicked a pile of debris, sending up a cloud of dust and hearing the distinctive sound of metal against concrete. He pulled a four-foot metal bar out of the trash. “Now this is what I’m talking about,” he said and kicked another heap of litter. “Come on guys, see what you can find.”

We left our positions by the window, well, everyone except Highland who still focused on the scene below, and started searching the abandoned warehouse. Moonshine picked up a two by four with nails sticking out of it and smiled. I found a large broom, not much of a weapon, but it did have a metal handle that may hold off an attacker for a moment or two. Princess picked up a metal trash can lid and laughed.

“We are so doomed, you guys,” she said.

We looked at each and laughed.

“When did we stop planning for the apocalypse?” I asked.

“About five years ago,” Rotten said.

“Yeah, about tenth grade or so,” Moonshine agreed.

“Who drove tonight?” Highland asked, his eyes still on the street below.

“I didn’t, I caught a ride,” Rotten said.

“Yeah, me too,” Moonshine said.

“My car’s in the shop,” Princess said. “And Dove took the bus.”

I nodded. “I figured I’d get a taxi home.”

“So no one has a car?” Highland asked.

We looked around at each and shrugged. “Nope,” I said. “How ‘bout you, Professor? Did you drive tonight?”

“Yes.” He nodded. “But I’m not going out there until the police come.”

“The police aren’t coming, man,” Rotten barked.

“Where’d you park?” I asked.

“The corner of Front and Broad.”

“Two blocks away,” Highland muttered to the background noise of screams coming from the street.

“Might as well be a mile,” Moonshine said, placed his weapon over his shoulder as he would a baseball bat, and walked back to the windows.

Rotten pulled out his cell phone and checked for service. “Still no signal,” he sighed and slid it back in his pocket. “Don’t know who I’d call anyway.”

“They probably shut the towers down, Internet, too,” Highland said.

“Why would they do that?” Princess asked.

“Probably want to keep the outbreak secret, they need to keep people calm, especially after that video of the newscaster attacking the camera man went viral, imagine how many folks are trying to upload videos of this mess,” Highland glanced down at the stain on his shirt again. “Rule number two, wear dark colors.”

Professor Kingswood laughed. “You guys are ridiculous! It’s a virus like the flu, but it causes brain swelling, irrational behavior, those people are not zombies and you can’t run out there and beat them with clubs and sticks. They’re sick. The police will come and deal with them soon.”

Rotten sighed and looked at me. “I’m not even gonna try to talk to him anymore, he just doesn’t get it.”

“It may be a virus, Professor, but it’s more like rabies than the flu,” Highland said. “Come look down there and tell me if that looks like the flu to you. You know with the flu you’re feverish and tired, you’re not running down the street tearing people’s guts out. And you sure as hell don’t get up after your guts have been torn out!”

The Professor stared at Highland for a moment and then dropped his head on his chest and held it. I sorta felt bad for him. You know, he’s an educated dude so this was so far outside of his perimeter of thought. His world backed up against early American writers – Romero didn’t earn him his Master’s degree.

“We can do this,” I walked to the window with my broom. What in the fuck, Dove? I thought. “Highland’s right. We need to watch, observe and figure it out.”

“They’re zombies, Sully!” Princess yelled and we all grew still. I wondered if the hoard below had heard us. Rotten ran to the window and looked down, while Highland and Moonshine grew stiff and leaned closer to the glass. “No more Professor this or Professor that. He’s fuckin’ Sully and he screwed me in my sophomore year. You know that, Dove!”

She looked at me and I saw tears in her eyes. “I knew someone, I just never caught the name,” I said honestly.

“Sully.” She pointed. “It was him.”

I nodded my head. “Sully, it is.” I turned to the guys. “Did they hear us?”

Moonshine shook his head. Rotten stood another moment and turned to me. “I don’t think so,” he said.

Highland looked down several more seconds and then said, “No. I don’t think they heard.” He rubbed his chin and twisted his head in the way a cat does when it’s trying to figure something out. “Do you think they can see?” He turned from the window. “Do they see?” he asked.

I thought back. Did they see? My memories of the last hours were hazy. We were standing on the street, yakking, while Rotten, Highland and I smoked a butt. Moonshine and Princess were there, although they had recently sworn off the tobacco. We saw the professor walk up and Princess got stiff. Shit, I didn’t know HE was the guy that screwed her over and broke her heart and led to her dropping out in our first year in college. She never gave me a name.

Anyway, we saw him walking up and Moonshine said something about him hitting on college girls. It was a joke. We all laughed, even Princess. We were still laughing when he tried to pass us to reach the door of Club 13. Moonshine moved out of the way to allow the man entrance to the building, but before his hand made it to the door a girl ran up screaming. I’d seen her in school once or twice, but I knew her from the gallery Princess had open down on 5th Street. The rent was two hundred bucks and Princess lived in the small room in the back.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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Turtles Voice (OP)
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09/25/2012 06:44 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
“Heather! What the fuck?” I yelled, because what the fuck?

She tried to speak, but couldn’t. She pointed into the back of the parking lot. The lot was lined in old cedar trees standing fifty feet high and blocking the site of the emergency clinic on the other side.

“Heather!” Rotten grabbed her shoulders and looked back to where she pointed. “What?”

She broke away and grabbed the door handle. She pulled and when she did, Penelope came falling through the opening. Now, I shared American Literature with Penelope in Professor Kingswood one o’clock class and I was quite surprised to see her jump on top of Heather and pull out her intestines.

“What the fuck??” Moonshine screamed. “Go, go, go, go!!”

We ran. Suddenly I was back in Highland’s basement watching zombie movies, smoking weed and drinking moonshine.

Moonshine grabbed Professor Kingswood and shoved him. “Run!” he screamed and Sully ran behind us, gaining ground and even passing Rotten in the lead.

“Where?” Sully yelled.

“Go, go, go, go!” Moonshine responded.

We ran on to Front Street, coming up beside the bar. The front of the bar was chaos and I couldn’t see much more than thrashing bodies and blood smatters on the windows and concrete.

“Left!” Rotten yelled and led the pack again.

Sully fell in line beside Rotten and Princess, Highland and I had taken the back. Moonshine pushed to the front of the line and yelled, “Move! Go!”

As I said the memories are vague, but as we crossed Second Street a man ran out of the tobacco shop and tried to grab Moonshine by the throat. The man was barefooted and dressed in a cotton robe and boxer shorts. He ran at Moonshine, his hands out stretched and his mouth open (I swear, I think he was drooling), but Moonshine saw him coming. He ducked low and caught the near-naked man in the stomach with his shoulder, flipping him on the concrete and stomping his boot-covered foot on the man’s throat. “Go, go, go, go!” he yelled.

Rotten took the lead.

And then we were on the block of the government subsidized apartments. They lined both sides of the street and there was no way to get past the twenty-four dark openings that led to the sidewalk we were traveling. Rotten led us into the middle of the road.

A young pregnant woman jumped from one of the porches as though she was a cricket on hot asphalt and appeared at Princess’s side. I have to admit there is a reason I have loved that girl since 4th grade.

“No, you the fuck don’t!” Princess bellowed and elbowed the girl in the jaw. “It was supposed to be a good day!”

The heavily pregnant girl fell on the blacktop and struggled to get to her feet around the huge belly.

Princess kicked her in the head. “No!” she yelled and we ran on.

A few steps later a kid rolled out so fast in a wheelchair I was amazed that the thing didn’t topple over. He launched his broken body in Rotten’s direction. Rotten extended one hand and caught the kid in the chest. The kid fell hard against the curb, crushingly hard I should say, and we ran on.

A couple steps later an old woman did a back flip and ended up right in Sully’s path. He stopped so suddenly he fell on his butt and the woman descended on him; I kicked her in the throat. She was frail, I outweighed her by a good twenty pounds, if not more, and I heard her neck snap. Highland pulled Sully up and we ran again.

“Right!” Highland screamed, as we approached the corner.

Rotten turned and we followed.

Highland dug in the pocket of his jeans and pulled out a key. I didn’t mention that Highland was also a photographer, did I? Yeah, he’s got the digital world on his personal string.

Highland took the lead.

He followed him half a block and then he hit a metal door. “Watch out, Rotten!” he said and slid the key home.

“It’s a gig,” he said, as we fell inside and he locked the door behind us. “Naked chicks, black and white, old warehouse.” He led us up the stairs. “Don’t judge me, it pays the bills.”

“Naked chicks? Why didn’t you call me?” Moonshine asked.

“It seemed like they could see,” I said. “The tobacco shop, the kid in the wheel chair, the pregnant girl. I think they see.”

Highland rubbed his chin and looked back onto the street. “They can see, but they can’t hear?” he muttered. “Oh, and they’re fast and do back flips.”

“Seems, like,” I said and yawned. Hell, it was the middle of the night and I’d spent the day feeling sorry for myself.

“This is what I think,” Highland said, turning from the window. “We sleep, in shifts. I’m thinking Rotten and Dove will take the first watch. Princess and Moonshine, the second. I’ll take the third. But I want you guys to pay attention, make notes if you have to. I’ll wake you guys in the morning and we’ll talk.”

“What about Sully? He doesn’t get a shift?” Moonshine asked.

“Not until he understands it isn’t the flu,” Rotten said. “Hell, he might open the door and offer them aspirin or something. He can’t be trusted.”

The others moved off to stretch out on the floor, Princess choosing a place far away from Sully, and Rotten and I stared down at the street. It was quieter; the screaming had all but stopped. He elbowed me and pointed down the street, I turned to see a man rolling down the street as you might see a child rolling down at grassy hill. He rolled quickly as though the side street was on an incline instead of completely level. Rotten and I glanced at each other but we didn’t speak, we turned back to the window and watched the man roll past.

“You saw the video of that guy jumping over rooftops and down on cars and back up again, right?” he asked.

“Yeah, like five times,” I said. “Weird shit.”

“How do you think it happened? What caused this rabid flu?”

“I think it was the vaccine they were pushing everyone to get. They said it was mandatory to get one in school, but I didn’t. Lot’s of folks didn’t.”

“Yeah, there were lots of scary stories floating around on the web. They kept disappearing real quick, but people had made copies and kept reposting them. The stories of hospitals being quarantined didn’t come out until after they started giving the vaccines, but they weren’t hitting the national news. The stories came from local papers that got posted on the web and disappeared within hours,” Rotten said.

“And all the other weird stories and the videos that have been going viral for a month now. You’re right, we should have seen this coming. Hell, we’ve been watching zombie movies forever.” How many times had we gathered at one another’s house for Night Of The Living Dead marathons?
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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Turtles Voice (OP)
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09/25/2012 06:47 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Not sure if anyone is reading, lol. And I'm trying to review it a bit before I post it, I wrote it in a a few hours spattered over a couple days and it's a mess.

Can't seem to finish zombie stories, but I can finish others. Weird.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
Turtles Voice (OP)
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09/25/2012 07:03 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
And what about The Omega Man? I know we watched that one a good thirty times, if not more. Could Charleston Heston been any more attractive and hip? We should have known – we should have, but we were caught up.

I was caught up in school and a degree in English, stupid in hindsight because how many English degree graduates did I meet serving me coffee, taking my drink order in a bar, or trying to sell me two hundred dollar jeans? Countless, I can say without hesitation.

Princess sold art. She sold her own and others. She lived bare-boned and often came to my apartment to eat. Rotten gigged and he made some money at it. Moonshine worked in a giant hardware store where he sold wood and wood accoutrements. And no one really knew what Highland did. Okay, we knew he did some photography, we knew he still lived in his parents house, we knew that he did some lightshows for a few bands and we knew he could get anything you needed and only charged you if it passed the hundred buck range. We knew nothing about Highland – never had.

We didn’t know they were coming. Rotten had a clue, though, I know because I kept seeing the emails with the video attachments. But I was busy. I usually caught them on my break between Philosophy and American Literature. I won’t say I’m a trust-fund baby, I’m not, but to my friends I had it made. I didn’t have to work, not yet anyway. My Grandpa invented this product that helped folks breath easier as they slept. He got rich. And since he only had three grandkids, he set us up. College education, room, board, and food paid until we graduated – then squat until we turned thirty-five. I was approaching the last year of my very liberal education.

We had forgotten the pacts and rules we made. We had simply forgotten. At eleven we knew the zombie apocalypse was going to happen. At twelve, we had plans – serious plans. At thirteen, we’d meet in the middle of the night at the corner of Atworth and Sumner and act out plans. At fourteen, we still got together and watched the movies. At fifteen, we were different. We were dating in one fashion or another, and not each other. We forgot about the plan. Sex, concerts, fashion, drugs and cliques got in the way of our plans.

“We should have known,” I whispered. “But we forgot.”

Rotten nodded his head.

We woke Moonshine and Princess a couple hours later and stretched out on the floor beside each other. Sully had balled up his suit jacket and used it as a pillow, but Highland lay flat on his back and had no support under his head. I lay on my stomach and cushioned my head with my arm.

I tried to sleep, but my mind found it hard to settle. That had always been my problem, I thought too much. I had been told over and again in my youth that I shouldn’t think so much, but really, how do you change that? I was a ponderer. Not much of a social creature unless a subject I could discuss was broached; that’s why I still kept in touch with my old high school friends, I fit in. It was rare in my travels, even in the classes I chose to take, that I’d find people who could even consider the alternative. These old friends were odd, but they were family and I trusted them.

I thought about the guy rolling hundreds of yards as though it was a few short yards. His bones and joints were thudding against concrete and yet he smiled. A few feet is all in good fun, I thought, remembering some drunken nights in my sophomore year and the hill out front of the fraternity house of Sigma Phi. Six feet after too much beer is fun, but a hundred yards on hard pavement is demented.

Sully said it was a brain-swelling virus; a flu. He compared it to meningitis. But I never heard stories of kids with meningitis tearing out people’s guts. And frankly, seeing Penelope rip into Heather was worse than all the zombie movies I had ever seen, and I know Highland was just as freaked, especially since the spray of the initial wound hit him square in the middle of his white shirt.

I drifted off to sleep, but I dreamed of back-flipping pregnant women and seas of blood.

Highland woke us with a poke of a boot to the ribs. I sat up and swung at him. “What the fuck!” I yelled.

“I know how you are, Dove,” he said, dodging my fist. “I ain’t bending down there to get my head knocked off. What the fuck, indeed!” He ambled off to the window.

Princess sat Indian style and rubbed her dreadlocks and Moonshine jumped up and did jumping jacks. Rotten stood up with a groan and said, “Is there a john in this place?”

“Down the stairs, first door on the right,” Highland pointed.

“He shouldn’t go alone,” Moonshine picked up the two by four with nails.

“I don’t want you listening to me piss,” Rotten snapped over his shoulder, already heading to the stairs.

“What the fuck, Rot, you think you’re the only one with a bladder. Get over yourself.”

After we had woken up as well as we could without coffee and had taken our turns in the bathroom we gathered back at the window, well, everyone except Sully. I think Sully was in shock, I mean we were all in shock, but Sully seemed to have a bad case as he sat on a crate and stared at the floor.

“Okay, report what you saw,” Highland said.

“We didn’t see much, some guy rolling down the street like he was rolling down a hill. And I mean all the way down the street, it was creepy,” I said.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
Turtles Voice (OP)
Turtles bite...

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09/25/2012 07:05 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
On page 12. Gotta go cook. I'll be back.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
waterman

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09/25/2012 07:08 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Then I woke up from the dream....but when I woke up I was laying in a 6x6 room of mirrors with no doors and no widows, and each directions looked like a hallway with no end..The End...I always wanted to end a story with that last line...thanks OP
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Turtles Voice (OP)
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09/25/2012 07:58 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
I'm steaming veggies and cutting potatoes, but if you wanted to read a finished short story - I often do finish them - here's a link.

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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Turtles Voice (OP)
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09/26/2012 05:28 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
I'm back, let's see if I can post more of the story - still got a bunch.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
Turtles Voice (OP)
Turtles bite...

User ID: 15791612
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09/26/2012 05:28 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Then I woke up from the dream....but when I woke up I was laying in a 6x6 room of mirrors with no doors and no widows, and each directions looked like a hallway with no end..The End...I always wanted to end a story with that last line...thanks OP
 Quoting: waterman


Mayhaps that will be the ending - oh shit! I hate when I paint myself in a corner chuckle
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
Turtles Voice (OP)
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User ID: 15791612
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09/26/2012 05:36 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
“We saw some guy running down the street on all fours like he was a cat, he loped, must have covered five feet at a time. That’s simply not humanly possible,” Moonshine said.

“Anything else?” Highland asked.

“No, not really,” Princess said, twisting her dreadlocks up on her head and stabbing a pencil through them to keep them off her back. “We saw a prostitute get attacked by an old man. He nearly tore her head off, but she got up, kinda listing to the left, and went in the same direction of her attacker.”

“What about you? What did you see?” Rotten asked.

“Maybe an answer to our problem. Look over there,” he pointed to the sidewalk on the opposite side of the street. “See that thing that looks like old clothes or a bag of trash?”

We studied and then nodded.

“That’s a zombie. I noticed a lot of them going up the street as the sun was coming up and heading towards the parking garage. They seemed to move with a purpose. That guy was far behind and couldn’t move as fast as the others, probably because his leg was just barely hanging on. Anyway, he stepped into a patch of sun, kinda stood there for a minute, and then collapsed, looked like smoke or steam was coming off his body and he shriveled up.”

“So, you’re saying they are zombie vampires?” I asked and laughed.

“Fucking cool, man!” Moonshine said and laughed.

“So you’re saying they won’t be out in the day?” Princess asked.

“That’s what I think, but we need to still be cautious. Maybe he was abnormal,” Highland chuckled. “As though any of them are normal. But I thought we should try to go by Princess’s place and let her get better clothes and shoes and then head out to my place in the old neighborhood.”
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
Turtles Voice (OP)
Turtles bite...

User ID: 15791612
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09/26/2012 05:47 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Having trouble posting more :(
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
Turtles Voice (OP)
Turtles bite...

User ID: 15791612
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10/06/2012 06:31 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
I looked at Princess’s mini skirt and platforms and down at my shorts and sandals. “I wouldn’t mind some better clothes.”

“Yeah, I know, Dove, but your place is the opposite direction and Princess’s is just a few blocks away.”

“I’ll give you some clothes, Dove, we wear the same size anyway.”

“Okay,” I said, not happy, but I guess in the zombie apocalypse you can’t have everything you want.

“Well, I’m going home,” Sully spoke. “I am not spending anymore time with you crazy people. Zombie vampires! Jesus, the only thing that is more hysterical is that you are actually serious. This is not some movie on Shock Theatre,” he said, referencing the late night gore fest on a local cable channel. “Those people are sick.”

“Says the man that cowered in a corner all night,” Rotten said. “And where were those police you were so sure were coming? Oh, that’s right, they didn’t come! Just like we said they wouldn’t. You haven’t even gotten off your designer jeaned ass to look out the fuckin’ window all night and if it wouldn’t have been for us, especially Moonshine, you would have been the next little morsel on Penelope’s menu!”

“Sick or zombies, Sully, they will kill you if they get a hand on you. We’d all be better off sticking together. But if you want to run off to your little condo alone, feel welcome. It shouldn’t be too hard for us to find a car, I’m pretty sure those guys sleeping it off in the parking garage won’t miss their cars. We need to move fast, though. We have a lot to do before it gets dark again,” Highland said and went to the trash piled along the walls to seek out a weapon. He pulled out a two-foot piece of galvanized steel conduit. “This will have to do, we gotta go!”

“I’m going only as far as my car,” Sully said, as we piled up against the metal door that led to the street.

“Fine,” Princess said. “You were always a weak-kneed, dick pill sucking bastard anyway. We don’t need you.”

“You guys ready?” Moonshine asked from the front of the line.

“Yeah,” I said, looking around at all of my friends from school with their recycled weapons. “I think we’re good.”

“All right, we move fast. Up to Broad and down to 5th. Stay in the road, away from shadows and buildings. Put Sully in the fucking middle cuz all he’s gonna do is whine. Unless…” Rotten chuckled, “we want to let him go play with the little flu sufferers.”

“That’s mean, Rotten,” I said.

“Mean, but funny,” Princess laughed with too much gusto.

“Ready?” Moonshine yelled and threw open the door. We followed, Highland behind Moonshine, and Princess and I on either side of Sully. Rotten took the rear.

Moonshine ran to the corner and stopped, looking both ways. “There’s nobody,” he said. We stood for a moment and listened to the silence.

“Good. Move.” Highland said, and pushed him in the back.

Moonshine jogged in the middle of the road. He jumped over a few black piles that Highland had pointed to on the street earlier; zombies that couldn’t find the dark in time. There were cars parked along the street, but no hurried employees seemed to be on the way to work. It was quiet and the usual line outside of Slug of Joe was non-existent.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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Turtles Voice (OP)
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User ID: 15791612
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10/06/2012 06:37 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
“Weird,” Princess muttered, jumping over a pile of what was once a human.

I have to admit, I admired the way she jogged in four-inch platforms.

We crossed 3rd Street and Moonshine slowed, looking up and down the intersection. “There’s nobody,” he said again.

“The one’s that survived are hanging low – move!” Highland pushed him forward.

We jogged on.

“Fuck!” Moonshine yelled and jumped, coming to a hard landing on both feet. He stopped. “Fuck!” We stopped behind him and he pointed. “What the fuck!”

It was a head. A woman’s head. She still wore lipstick and eyeliner. Actually, she looked perfect besides the fact that she was missing her body.

“What the fuck!” Moonshine yelled again.

“She’s dead,” Rotten said from the rear of the pack. “Zombie 101, Moon, gotta take off the head to kill them.”

I laughed, I didn’t mean to. I mean it was a head, with make-up! Shit, I wanted to sob, but I laughed.

“What the fuck, Dove?” Moonshine yelled.

“I know,” I said, laughing harder. “I’m sorry.” The tears came.

Princess started laughing and then Highland chuckled.

“Shit!” Rotten yelled and felt to his knees, clasping his belly and laughing along with us.

Okay, we knew it was wrong, but it was either laugh or give up. It was a head, in the middle of the street, wearing make-up! I know I can’t explain it, but we laughed.

Moonshine looked at us for a moment with wide eyes and then fell into his classic giggle that almost sounded like a donkey braying. We laughed harder.

“You’re all insane!” Sully broke from the pack and ran to the corner.

“Stay out of the shadows!” Highland snapped.

“There’s nobody! They’re all fucking dead!” Sully bellowed.

“He’s gone,” Princess muttered.

“Yep,” Moonshine agreed and moved towards the man.

“Stay the fuck away from that doorway!” Rotten yelled and began to run in Sully’s direction, his metal stick held high.

Sully turned and ran into the alcove of the National Bank. He ran to the doors and pounded on the thick, metal mesh that separated him from the glass doors that led to safety. He peered through the mesh and could see no one inside. He turned and looked back at the street. He could see Rotten running in his direction and he looked for a way out. He turned to his left and then he saw them.

Four of them perched on a little marble bench out of the sun. Two were children and their eyes glowed green like the night shine you see when you spot a raccoon in your yard with a flash light, or when your headlights cross a cat in the middle of the night on a lonely, dark road. Night shine, on a city street, at seven in the morning. He looked to the right and saw three more, one an old lady in a housedress that looked like his grandma.

Sully screamed and ran towards Rotten. “Fuck! They’re in there!” He yelled and grabbed Rotten by the shoulder. He pointed back from where he had just escaped. “In there!!”

Rotten stepped to the edge of the alcove and looked inside. “Go, go, go, go!” He yelled and took off in the lead. We followed, Sully in the rear and looking totally beat up.

“Fuck, I never… What …. Jesus … Really …. Fuck … No, I …. What ….” Sully moved to the middle of the pack, but kept muttering.

Princess laughed. “Who isn’t speaking in complete sentences now?”

We passed the bar where it had all started. There were no bodies littering the street, but the sidewalk and windows looked like Polack had spent an evening there focused only on brown and red paint.

Highland didn’t say a word, but he did look down at his stained t-shirt.

We passed another head beside a Jeep and Moonshine ran and puked beside a truck. This head didn’t have make-up, or an eye, and half of its scalp was missing. This head was not funny.

“Come on, Moon,” Rotten said.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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Turtles Voice (OP)
Turtles bite...

User ID: 15791612
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10/06/2012 06:52 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Moonshine wiped his mouth with the bottom of his t-shirt and stood. “Let’s go.”

We continued to run.

“Got your key, Princess?” Highland asked.

“I don’t have a key, I don’t lock the place.”

“What the fuck!” Moonshine stopped. “You don’t fuckin’ lock the place. Really??” He jumped up and down, grabbed his blonde curls and fell to his knees. “We’re so doomed. Every fucking zombie vampire is gonna be in there. Jesus, Princess!”

“You can’t lock that back door?” Rotten asked.

She shrugged. “It’s in the alley, never thought about it.”

“We’re screwed,” I said. “Princess, really? Okay, okay. What about the front door? Can we go in that way?”

“I don’t have a key,” Princess said and looked at the overturned trash can on the curb.

“So you’re saying you don’t have a key for the front or the back of your house?” Highland asked, kicking the trash spilling out of the can.

“Yeah, that’s what I’m saying.” Princess pulled her head up and looked us in the eye. “Yeah, that’s what I’m saying. I don’t live with my parents,” she looked at Highland. “I don’t have a trust fund,” she stared me down good. “I can’t get some chick to front my bills because I’m a rock star in the making,” she poked Rotten in the chest. “And I’m not friends with fifteen jocks that will make sure I have a place to live,” she tugged Moonshine’s curls. “It’s just me folks, and this is what I have. Quit your fucking bitching and let’s move. If you don’t want to go through the alley, we’ll break a window. Move!” Princess took the lead wearing four-inch platforms. Trust be told, she rocked.

We encountered six more withered bodies on her street; the view of the river was also the exact spot where the sun rose. She stopped and looked down the shadowed and shade covered cobblestone that led to the alley that opened to the back of the gallery. She shook her head. “Rotten, make yourself useful and bust this window,” she said.

The window was a good twelve feet high and eight foot wide. Inside, perfect for window-shopping, were vintage clothes and jewelry, paintings and a giant ceramic giraffe. “Break it,” she said and held her stomach, walking away.

It took five hits from Rotten’s metal pole to break the glass – five. They sure don’t make things like they used to. It shattered and Princess cringed. “All right,” she said from the middle of the street. “Who ever has the best weapon go first.” She tilted her head, smiled, and held up her trashcan lid.

“I got it,” Rotten said.

“Right behind you,” Moonshine said.

Highland stepped in behind them.

The glass shattered under our feet and the retail space was full of light. We stepped down from the window display. “I don’t see anyone,” Moonshine said.

“Too much light,” Highland responded.

“My clothes are back there,” Princess pointed to a door behind a display case that held an old fashioned cash register.

“Of course it is,” Rotten laughed. “Back in the darkest corner.”

“Shut up, dick,” Princess elbowed him in the ribs.

Rotten looked us both up and down and sighed. “They need clothes.”

“Yeah, I know,” Moonshine agreed.

“Okay, who’s taking the lead?” Highland asked.

“I will,” Rotten paused. “Fuck, we didn’t watch enough cop movies!” He laughed and grew serious. “Okay. Moon, I’ll go first and to the left. I’ll make sure there’s no meanies and you come and clear the right. We take it slow. Princess, you have a flashlight?”

“Yeah, under the counter.” She pointed to the cash register.

“Okay, Moonshine you grab that. Highland, you head to the back. Shit, we need a gun!”

“I have a gun!” Princess said. “In there, in the closet. My step-dad gave it to me.”

“Cooking with fire, now,” Moonshine whispered as they stepped closer to the dark corner.

“Yeah, but we have to get there,” Rotten cautioned.

We moved forward, all except Sully, he sat on the edge of the street side display case picking up bits of glass, studying them and then dropping them on the floor.

I remembered our plans from the nights we’d meet on the street corner and was impressed how well we moved together until Princess reached over and switched on all the lights. We jumped.

“What the hell, you scared the shit out of me!” I snapped.

“Shhh!” She held her fingers to her lips and we heard groaning. She hit a couple more switches and the groan became louder. “Hide!” She ran to the front side of the display case. I followed.

The swinging door flew open and a couple vampire/zombies ran for cover only to burn up a few feet from Sully. Yep, they hated the light. Sully screamed, but truthfully, we had run out of patience for him. When the door fell open, Moonshine, Rotten and Highland fell against the display case, but since Princess has set lights down below to highlight her own legs, the zombies avoided that space.

“What the fuck, Princess?” Rotten bellowed. “You should have warned us!” He stood up and straightened his t-shirt.

“Like I know what I’m doing,” she said, rising from the front of the case. “Dove and I need clothes.”

The guys led their way into Princess’s living space, which basically consisted of one large room. She grabbed the flashlight from Moonshine and threw open the only closet. “Get dressed, Dove,” she said, after ensuring none of the undead was near her underwear.

I did as I was told. I kicked off the sandals and ditched the carefully shredded and expensive shorts. I pulled a pair of Levi’s off the shelf and shimmied into them as I looked for some sturdy shoes.

“Here,” Princess said, handing me a pair of LLBean Boots. “Thrift store, three bucks. You owe me.” She pulled on a pair of jeans, reached into a plastic bin and tossed me a pair of socks.

“Thanks,” I said, changing quickly.

She rattled some hangers, after her shoes where tied, and tossed me a sweater. “Ann Taylor, two bucks at Salvation Army, you owe me.” She pulled on her own sweater.

We ran out of the closet three minutes after we ran in.

“The gun, Princess, don’t forget the gun,” Rotten said and Princess ran back in the closet. She came out and shoved a bag in Rotten’s hands.

“I don’t know shit about guns,” she said and went to the mirror and pulled the pencil out of her hair.

“I do,” Highland said and took the bag from Rotten.

I joined Princess at the mirror and pulled my hair up into a ponytail, she did too, but it was harder for her considering the dreadlocks and all.

“Are we ready?” I asked, turning away from my own image.

“Yep,” Rotten said.

“Let’s rock,” Moonshine punched the wall.

“Hey, man, I know the is the apocalypse and all, but chill the fuck out. This is my house,” Princess snapped, but kept her eyes focused on the mirror and the difficulty of squirreling up six years of dreadlock growth.

“Sorry, P,” Moonshine said and joined Highland. “Do you know the gun?”

“Yeah, not much fire power, but it’ll do,” he slid two quick loaders in his pocket. He held the .38 in his hands and looked down the barrel at the wall. “It’ll have to do.”

“Let’s go,” Rotten said, moving to the door.

“What about Sully?” Princess asked.

“What about him?” Moonshine picked up his two by four.

“We can’t leave him studying glass pieces in my gallery.”

“If he ain’t coming, then he ain’t coming and I sweat to God P, if you fight us on that I’ll throw you over my shoulder and tote you out,” Moonshine said.

“Give the rat bastard a chance,” I said. “He has a car with keys.”

“I can hot wire,” Highland said, sliding the gun in his front pocket.

“Of course you can,” I said. “Can you also call a helicopter?”

“Don’t be a bitch, Dove,” Rotten said. “We’ll offer him a chance.”

“He’s an idiot,” I said. “Give him more than a chance.”

Highland sighed. “You need to know we can’t save all of them, Dove.”

“We’re gonna save him,” Princess said and pulled a baseball bat from behind her bed.

“Yeah,” I said, suddenly feeling like an idiot. But if Princess cared, well then, damn it, I cared.

“I’ll get him,” Moonshine sighed. “Are we ready?”

“Yeah,” Princess said and tossed me a nine iron.

“Really?” I asked. “A golf club?”

She shrugged and focused on Moonshine. “We’re ready.”
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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Turtles Voice (OP)
Turtles bite...

User ID: 15791612
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10/06/2012 07:07 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Moonshine burst into the retail space, his club raised. He was followed by Rotten and Highland, their pipes in the air. Princess and I took the rear with a bat and club. We were ready to rumble, but the only person we saw was Sully, crying over broken glass and the two zombies that had melted away like the wicked witch from the west when she encountered water.

“Get the fuck up,” Moonshine grabbed the professor, and Rotten and Highland searched his pockets.

“Keys, I got keys,” Rotten held them up and smiled.

“Fucking drugs, I got drugs,” Highland held up three prescription bottles. “Let’s see, we got uppers, downers and bone hardeners. What the hell, professor, no wonder you’re hitting chicks twenty years younger than you.” He shook the bottles, smiled and slid them in his pocket. “These could come in handy.”

“You don’t know me,” Sully bellowed as Moonshine set him on his feet. “You don’t know me!”

“I do,” Princess said. “In the biblical sense and I know you’re a dick. But I don’t want to see you dead. Come with us, now!” She stood before him, her hand on her hip and I thought she was amazing.

“Ready,” Rotten looked at us.

I nodded. “Let’s do it.” He nodded his head.

Really, what else could he do?

Moonshine hit the door and slid the deadbolt out of place. “You guys ready? A block down and one block up?”


“Go, already,” Princess said.

Moonshine threw open the door and jogged, we followed. We covered the first block without incident. Where were they? Moonshine turned toward Broad Street. He jogged in the middle of the road and we passed art galleries, coffee shops and tattoo studios, but we didn’t see a human. We hit Broad Street and headed towards Sully’s Escalade.

“It’s yours, dude,” Rotten tossed him the keys when we reached it.

Sully caught them and looked stunned. “What are you guys going to do?”

“We’ll find a ride, Sully,” Princess said.

Sully rubbed his head, the long hair that made him so attractive to young English students, and then he stroked his beard. “Fuck it!” he declared and tossed the keys to Highland. “I just don’t know,” he said.

Highland pushed the button on the key ring that made the doors unlock and jumped into the passenger seat. “Moonshine, you drive.” He slid a key into the ignition.

“Fuck, yeah!!” Moonshine declared, sliding into cabin and adjusting the seat.

Princess, Rotten and I slid into the backseat and Sully crawled in behind us, nearly kicking Rotten in the jaw as he slid into the rear space.

“Go, Moon,” Highland said. “Time is short.”

Moonshine drove.

It was weird seeing the city with decapitated bodies littering the sidewalks and strange bags of multi-colored, smoldering waste that we knew used to be human, scattered in the street. But Moonshine drove. We didn’t see people going off to work, although it was pushing eight am on a weekday, and we didn’t see living people in the Waffle House or in the Krispy Crème. No one was in the Starbucks on the corner of 12th and Broad when Moonshine took a hard left and hit the expressway that crossed the river. No living people were at breakfast houses or coffee shops, but on the sidewalk outside of the buildings was many burnt husks of what used to be people.

“There’s nobody,” Moonshine muttered.

“Nope, not that we can see,” I said.

“They’re still here, though,” Rotten said.

“How do you know?” Princess asked. “I think they’re all dead. We’re alone with the dead.”

“No, not all,” Highland said. “But most. Most of them are dead.”

“Shit,” Moonshine said, slowing as he entered the city limits of Freemont.

He passed the town hall seeing the similar burnt waste in front of the doors of the historic building and passed a body without a head outside of the newspaper office. “Shitfire, we are so screwed,” he muttered as he passed the Baptist church. The church owned most of a city block in the small town and as we drove past, I understood why Moonshine bitched.

Have you ever opened a window that hasn’t been opened in a long time? Have you seen the bodies resting on the windowsill? It’s not just flies. It’s dragonflies, butterflies, moths, ladybugs, spiders and other strange entities you can’t even identify. That’s what we saw on that block. We saw the dead. Some of what we saw were just pieces, a hand here, a foot there, a thigh and torso tossed over a tree branch. Others were like the burned out crap you find when you change the bulb in the front porch light, just hulls of what used to be alive.

On the block that the church owned were hundreds of dried out shells. They were once human, but I guess they chose to face the light to their absolute damnation. I assumed that they were seeking something they remembered, something familiar.

“Go faster,” Rotten said.

“Yeah, man, what the fuck?” Princess said, dropping her head onto her knees.

“Kick it, Moon, we got a ways to go,” I said and covered my eyes as well. It was hard to see the dead outside of the church. I ached for them. I believed that they were following what they remembered, which actually gave me hope, somehow they still remembered, but seeing the husks of their bodies was devastating. But at least they remembered, somehow, despite their change from human to something less, they remembered.

“I’m thirsty,” Moonshine said. “And fucking hungry. I’m stopping up here.”

“What?” Highland was caught unaware. “There’s food and water at my house!”

“And fucking zombies!” Moonshine yelled and jumped a median, the Escalade handling the upset surprisingly well. He slid into the parking lot of a convenience store. “I need food now!” He pocketed the keys and threw open the door. “Now!” he bellowed and slammed the door.

“I guess he’s hungry,” Rotten said and opened his own door.

“Fuck my life,” Highland said and pulled the gun from the bag.

“Foodies sound good to me,” I said, opening my door.

“We’re so freakin’ doomed,” Princess said, sliding out behind me.

“You folks are insane,” Sully said, as he rolled over the backseat and crawled out of the vehicle behind Rotten.

“How do you know there are zombies at my place?” Highland asked, slowing Moonshine with a hand on his arm. He held up the gun and turned to us. “Any other weapons, peeps?”

Shit. I had forgotten mine and so had Rotten and Princess. We ran back to the SUV and grabbed our gear, frankly we felt like newbis in the whole apocalypse thing. If it had been a video game we’d be on our third life.

“You think your mom survived it, Highland? I don’t think my mom or dad did. What about you, Rot? Think your folks survived it?”

“How the fuck do I know, Moon? They’re in freakin’ France!”

“How ‘bout you Dove?” Moonshine asked. “Think you’re parents are alive and kicking or burned up outside Our Lady of Peace?”

“Fuck you, Moon! What the hell, man?” Princess hit him in the back with her fist. She didn’t really hurt him, but she made her point. “Yeah, everyone’s dead, we get it. Deal with it! You whiny ass, pampered bitch. We know! They’re dead! Are you hungry or not?”

Moonshine laughed. “Hungry as hell.”

“Then quit bitching,” Princess said and led the way to the door of the store.

The store was locked tight. No one could be seen inside, despite Moonshine pounding on the glass. “They’re all gone,” he said. “We’re so fucked.”

We stood for a moment and then Rotten raised his weapon. It only took three hits to bust the glass. No alarm sounded and we busted out the rest of the glass to get through the opening. Moonshine ran to the candy aisle and shoved a Snicker’s in his mouth; he grabbed a few more and shoved them in his pocket. Highland gathered bottles of water and Red Bulls from the fridges and I grabbed some caffeine pills off the counter. Rotten was on the bread aisle and stuffed a couple loaves and packs of sticky buns in the pockets of his cargo shorts.

Princess ran to the restroom and came out bellowing, “When did they replace the tampon machines with fucking condoms? Really?” She stalked down the paper towel aisle and grabbed some of the boxes of Tampax. “What the fuck? I need a fucking tampon, on the fucking john, and all I get is condoms? Who in the hell makes these decisions??” She stomped back to the bathroom.

I laughed and I’m pretty sure Highland and Rotten blushed, but Moonshine was too busy stuffing his face to have a response. I went to the aisle Princess just recently stomped down and grabbed the rest of the tampons. How was it tampons never came up in our apocalypse plans? Hell, I grabbed all the pads, as well, and went behind the counter and stuffed them into the bags I found there. It was hitting home now. I mean, I know, the dead bodies and stuff should have done it, right? But the idea of an unstoppable blood flow messed with me. I know it’s nature and stuff, but somehow not having a tampon was suddenly worse than dead folk outside of a church.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
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Turtles Voice (OP)
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10/06/2012 07:29 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Sully grabbed wine from the small display in the corner of the store, while Highland started stacking cases of water. Moonshine was tearing through the candy aisle, shoving more calories than a body needed in their lifetime into his pockets. Rotten grabbed batteries and cheap flashlights and for some reason, air fresheners.

Princess came out of the bathroom, still carrying boxes of tampons and I met her with some bags. She dumped them in and then grabbed some Midol, Tylenol and Excedrin off the shelves. “It’s gonna suck being a woman during the apocalypse, Dove,” she said and went to the coolers and grabbed a few six-packs.

“Yep,” I said, following her and bagging her selections. “A real freaking bitch.”

“You know we’re fucked, right?” Moonshine said, snatching a bag from my hand and tossing in boxes of Twix bars and M&Ms. “Totally fucked. Every body is dead and we’re gonna have to start the new world. Us!” He laughed. “Can you imagine? Us? Shit, we’re all the biggest messes that came from Washington High School! Hell, if it wasn’t for Highland, none of us would’ve graduated.” He laughed harder. “And if it wasn’t for us, Highland never would’ve gotten laid.”

“He’s lost it,” Princess muttered.

“Yep,” I agreed.

“Wanna flip a quarter?” she asked.

“No, I got it. You’ve had a rough day.” I stepped up to Moonshine. I stood tall, using all four inches above the five-foot mark. “Stop it,” I said. I didn’t speak loudly. “Just shut up,” I almost whispered. I didn’t want to embarrass him, but we were all scared. “Quit being a dick.”

For a moment I thought he was going to hit me and that would have been bad. Not just because he could knock me out, he was a very big guy, but because the others would stand up for me. It was be chaos, as though there wasn’t enough insanity happening all around us. I felt the rage swell through him and it seemed even his eyeballs expanded with the emotion. And then he dropped to his knees.

“There’s nobody!” he sobbed.

We sort of descended on him.

Rotten was the first to reach him. “We’re gonna make it, dude,” he said, his hand on Moonshine’s shoulder.

“Yeah, Moon, it’s gonna be all right,” Highland touched his back briefly and pulled away.

“Moon Man!” Princess wrapped her arms around his neck. “You and me, you know.” She whispered something in his ear and kissed him on the cheek.

“I love ya’, Moon,” I said. “I’m sorry for being a bitch.” I ruffled his curls and kissed him on the cheek.

As I stood I caught sight of Sully standing behind the counter and double-bagging bottles of wine. Our eyes met for a moment and I suddenly understood why girls my age chased a man old enough to be their father. His hair was longish and still dark, his beard was just beginning to gray, and his jeans still fit as they would on a much younger man. But it was in his eyes. Whatever the girls went for with Sully, it wasn’t his curly dark hair or his nice ass, it was his eyes. I’d heard the word golden brown since I was a child, but I’d never actually seen it until those few moments. Sully’s eyes were golden brown. Not yellow, not brown and certainly not green, but somehow they were both bright and dark.

“I’m good,” Moonshine said, sniffing and wiping his nose on his shirt.

Princess handed Moonshine a box of Kleenex and started stuffing packs of toilet tissue and paper towels in bags.

“We should go,” I said, nodding at Highland.

“Yeah, let’s load up, guys,” Highland said.

And that’s what we did. We loaded up our unpaid purchases and climbed back into Sully’s Escalade. Rotten took over driving and Highland sat beside him. Princess and I settled in the back seat and then Sully climbed in beside us. Moonshine took the rear, stretching out as best he could and covering his eyes with his arm.

As we passed the elementary school Rotten slowed. “Look,” was all he said.

“Jesus, dude,” Princess barked.

He stopped the car. “No, look. Highland, look,” he said.

And we looked. The schoolyard was littered with the burned out shells that we knew were once human, then zombie and now dried out husks. They covered the playground and the sidewalks and more than a dozen were piled up outside the double doors that allowed entrance to the building.

“Why?” Princess asked. “Why were they at the school?”

“It’s a weekday, I think they remembered that they were supposed to be in school. Like the church, I think the zombies still remember pieces of being human. The kids went to school because that’s what they do and I think the other people went to the church because they were seeking hope and peace. And those folks at Starbucks, Waffle House and the donut shop were seeking their morning pick me up. They still remembered something about being human,” I spoke what I had been thinking earlier when I saw the husks outside of the church.

“Weird, I don’t remember that from zombie movies,” Rotten said and pulled away from the curb.

“That could be a good thing,” Highland said. “Or at least it gives us an advantage to figure out where they may be. They move at dark it seems, so we need to get to my house and prepare, but maybe they go to familiar places in the morning?” He rubbed his head. “Shit, I’m tired. I can’t think.”

“I think you’re right, Highland,” I said. “The school and Starbucks make sense, they’re remembering their schedule, but a church on Friday morning? And not even a Catholic Church,” I laughed, remembering the church ladies my mom pals around with. Yes, they were at the church every morning it seemed. But a Baptist church? They were different than us Catholics. I laughed again. They never covered this stuff in zombie movies. “Maybe the folks outside of the church were remembering God.”

Sully laughed. “God!” He laughed again and screwed open a bottle of wine. “To steal you guy’s vernacular, what the fuck, dude? God?” He took a long swallow from the bottle of cheap red wine. “So what you’re saying is the church is where the retards go to die?”


“Turn right,” I said.

Rotten glanced at me through the rearview and cautioned with one word, “Dove.”

“I know, just turn.” Our Lady of Peace was on the next corner, my mom’s church and the church I grew up attending.

Princess put her hand on my arm. “Are you sure?”

I nodded. “Just do it, Rotten.”

Rotten turned. I held my breath as Princess gripped my arm. He pulled up in front of Our Lady of Peace. I saw the pile of burnt out husks in the front of the building and jumped from the vehicle, Princess followed and so did Highland and Rotten. I approached the pile slowly and saw hints of pink plaid, green ivy and the familiar yellow dress.

I didn’t speak, what could I say? That was Momma. I knew that dress, had seen it easily hundreds of times since I was six-years-old. Momma never threw anything away. “Shit!” I fell to my knees.

“Dove!” Princess wrapped around me. Rotten grabbed both of my shoulders and kissed me on the cheek and Highland reached down and rubbed my back for a moment. No one knew what to say, and I least of all. There was my mom, a bit of yellow fabric over a dried carcass.

“Shit!” I threw them off and stood up. I walked over to the gate that led to the cemetery and stared inside. “Shit!”

“We could bury her,” Rotten suggested.

“There must be shovels and stuff in a cemetery, right?” Princess asked.

“No! We don’t have time.” I tried to settle my breathing and the numbness hit me. If it hadn’t hit before with all we’d dealt with in the last hours, it certainly hit me then. Yeah, I knew Heather and Penelope, but I didn’t love them. My mom … I loved. “We go on. Let’s go!” I turned back to the vehicle and I felt how uncomfortable the others were with my emotions, but I didn’t know how to change it. I was emotionally ravaged and angry. That was my mom.

Highland put his arm around me before I reached the car. “Remember what you said, Dove. It was God that brought her here, even if she had changed to something not human, it was God, her soul, her memories, that brought her here.” He kissed me lightly on the temple and pushed me toward the backdoor.

I crawled in the backseat and Princess crawled over top of me and pushed Sully against the other door. She reached into the back and Moonshine woke up enough to hand her a box of tissues. I cried. Princess petted my hair, hugged my neck and handed me tissues to blow my nose.

I gathered myself and sat up straighter when we hit the old neighborhood. We all did, except Sully, he stared out the window and sipped red wine from a bottle. We didn’t reminisce in words, but we all looked at old familiar places and the houses we each grew up in when we met.

My parents had moved into a smaller house on a golf course, Rotten’s parents lived on a mountaintop in North Georgia and traveled the world. Moonshine’s parents lived in the trailer park down by the river and Princess parents died in a car wreck when she was eight-years-old and her foster parents disappeared from the neighborhood shortly after kicking her out after she graduated high school. Highland’s mom was the only one left in the old neighborhood, the place where we once gathered many a day to watch horror movies and sneak beers or moonshine or other illicit intoxicants in the basement.

We’d never asked about his dad and he never spoke of him. It was just Highland and Mrs. Williams. Mrs. Williams was a kind lady, old fashioned in her demeanor. She didn’t work, watched game shows and soap operas, cooked, cleaned, joined committees and adored Highland. She was a bit out of step with the world, but just likeable. At first you’d think she was just slow, but she’d say something profound, giggle and hand you a cookie she’d just pulled from the oven. Frankly, Mrs. Williams was an enigma.

Over the years we had mentioned that Mrs. Williams probably knew what we were doing in the basement, especially after the night Moonshine puked peach moonshine on the wall. But she cleaned it up, called our parents and put us all to bed. She had to know, but she said it was terrible food poisoning and refused forever after to go the Pizza Hut on the corner. She had to know … we’d eaten pepperoni pizza and what Moonshine puked was totally peach and then Rotton puked. The rest of us kept it down, but she had to know.

Rotten slowed and turned on Highland’s street - Cardinal Lane. I straightened and grabbed my golf club and noticed that even Moonshine was alert and ready to slide over the seat with his two-by-four.

Rotten stopped in front of the house and we observed three husks in the yard, one by the garage door and the other two at the front. “What do you think it means, dude?” he whispered.

Highland rubbed his head; his unkempt curls a mess. “It’s Friday, right?”

We nodded.

“Mr. Keppler is at the garage to collect recycling. Mom says it was silly for the city to charge her for picking up recycling when they were making money on it, so she gives it to the poor folks to make money on. At the front is Miss Lily,” he sniffed and wiped his nose on the bottom of his t-shirt, “and Mrs. Eddy. Quilting every Friday morning for the last fifteen years.”

“What do you want me to do, man?” Rotten asked.

“Turn in.” He reached in his backpack and pulled out a control for the garage door. “Pull in,” he said as Rotten started up the drive and we heard the engine engage and saw the door begin to lift. “Guys, get ready.”

Moonshine slid over the backseat and would have kicked Sully if he hadn’t caught Moon’s feet. He settled between Princess and I and lifted me and set me in the middle of the seat. “I’m going first,” he said.

“He’s back,” Princess whispered in my ear.

“It’s dark in there,” Rotten stopped right outside of the opening.

“Just do it,” Highland said, rolling down his window. He picked up the gun. “Just do it.”

Rotten pulled forward slowly, thumping over what used to be Mr. Keppler. He pulled into the dark garage and stopped when the tennis ball hanging from above tapped the window and marked the parking spot.

“Flashlight!” Highland snapped. “Fucking flashlight!”

Rotten fumbled on the space between the seats and grabbed one of four. He hit the switch and handed it to Highland.

Highland took it, slowly panning it through his side of the building and handed it back. “It’s clear here. Roll down your window and check your side.”

“Looks good here,” Rotten said after doing as instructed.

“All right.” He hit the button on the control and the engine engaged, shutting the daylight out. Highland sighed. “Okay,” he whispered. “We go slow.” He handed a couple flashlights to us. “Moonshine, you check out the back on your side and Princess and Dove, crawl over Sully and check out that side. We’ll all go out together.”

Princess and I crawled over Sully and pushed him to the middle of the seat.

“Ready,” I said and Princess turned on the flashlight.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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Turtles Voice (OP)
Turtles bite...

User ID: 15791612
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10/06/2012 07:30 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
A little bit more and then I have to go get pretty to go to hubby's gig.

Hope someone is reading this, lol.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
Turtles Voice (OP)
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10/06/2012 07:31 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
I grabbed Princess’s shoulder and Moonshine screamed as he ran to the front of the garage, his two-by-four raised high.

“Well, it’s about time you got home,” Mrs. Williams said, throwing open the backdoor carrying a shotgun and wearing an apron over jeans.

I’d never seen Mrs. Williams in jeans. She always wore dresses, housedresses, skirts, skorts, pedal-pushers and truth be told, some great vintage 50s garb, but never jeans. And a shotgun?

“Come in, come in,” she opened the door and smiled. I noticed that even though her hair was not in its perfect style, she still wore lipstick. And then the scent of bacon hit me.

Moonshine caught it next and laughed. “I love you, Mrs. Williams!”

“Love you too, Michael.” She smiled. “Come on kids, we have a lot to do.”

Highland smiled and grabbed his backpack off the seat of the car.

As we piled into the back door Mrs. Williams pulled out plates of sausage and potatoes from the oven and then set a platter of sliced tomatoes, mushrooms, cucumbers and chucks of cheddar on the table. “Sit down,” she said, sliding a pan of biscuits in the oven.

She opened the fridge, as we took our old familiar places around the table, and set down three different juices and a gallon of milk. “You guys need your energy, help yourself.” She glanced at Sully as he settled at the head of the table, a place we’d never seen anyone sit. “No alcohol at my table, young man.”

I had to give Sully credit. He nodded his head, stood up and set the bottle on the counter. “I lost the lid, ma’am,” he said.

Mrs. Williams nodded and poured him a glass of orange juice. “Sit down and drink your juice.” She patted him on the shoulder.

She went to the stove and poured a huge bowl of eggs into a giant black skillet and began stirring. “Help yourselves, kids, the eggs will done in a minute.”

I grabbed a slice of tomato and Princess a slice of cucumber.

“Protein, girls,” Mrs. Williams said, her back to us. “You’re actually in the zombie apocalypse now, you need protein. Plus, we have to bury some bodies.” She stirred harder and checked the biscuits.

“What?” Highland asked, jumping from his chair. “What bodies?”

“Well, one, Midget. I didn’t know dogs could get infected, Wayne, I’m sorry.” She set the spoon on the side of the stove and gave him a hug. She pulled away and returned to the eggs. “And Lydia Cane and her mom, Eden.” She stirred harder. “They were the first, I didn’t know it was happening. I mean how many times have you kids sat around the table plotting and planning? Hundreds? I always thought I should encourage it, it’s imagination - I shouldn’t discourage that. But I certainly didn’t believe it.” She turned off the heat under the iron pan and continued to stir.

“I had just finished digging up that old dead peach tree in your dad’s garden. I know it was late. I probably shouldn’t have been out so late, but it was the anniversary of his death and the tree he planted has been dead for at least two years. I had a glass of wine,” she glanced at Sully, “and decided it was time.”

“I didn’t see them until I had clipped all the branches, cut the trunk up and moved it to the street. And when I was working to dig up the old roots, they hopped the fence. They hopped it like banshees or monkeys or something you’d see in those crazy movies you kids watch. Eden went at me and Lydia got Midget. I still had the shovel in my hands. You know, the root cutting one you just ordered for me?” She smiled over her shoulder at Highland as she pulled the biscuits from the oven. “I killed her. And then Lydia came at me, I still had the shovel in my hands, I killed her too. And I thought Midget was just injured and I ran to him, luckily I still had the shovel.” She sighed and buttered the biscuits. “You kids never talked about zombie animals.”

“Fuck!” Moonshine said and shoved a piece of sausage in his mouth.

“Language, Michael!” Mrs. Williams said and sliced open another biscuit.

“Yes, ma’am,” Moon said, and chewed his sausage.

“Zombie animals?” Princess asked, nibbling on a piece of cheddar. “Why didn’t we think of that?”

Highland paced and wiped his face from a paper towel he snatched from the roll. “Midget?” he whispered.

“I’m sorry, honey.” Mrs. Williams poured the eggs into a huge bowl and set it on the table. “I’ve got the downstairs windows covered, and I pulled up the rest of the wood from the basement for the upstairs. I thought you guys might need some sleep, so we have fresh sheets on the beds and I stored about 40 gallons of water, I know that’s not much, but the filter is slow sometimes and I’ll have more by evening. I don’t know when the power or the water will go out so in the mean time, we take advantage.”

“Mom, you’re awesome,” Highland sat down at the table, wiped tears from his eyes and spooned some eggs in his plate. “Okay, guys. Animals go zombie, now we know. Let’s eat.”

We ate and we talked like we did when we were kids - we plotted the zombie apocalypse with both jokes and seriousness. Sully didn’t say much, he ate and he ate well, as did the rest of us. But he didn’t speak. He glanced at the bottle of wine on the counter a couple times, I thought longingly, but he didn’t reach for it.

We talked about zombie animals. That was shocking to our senses, as many movies that we had studied, as many crazy teen novels we had read, we weren’t prepared for zombie animals. How would you know if an animal had gone zombie? It’s not like they could speak. And sometimes animals were afraid or skittish, but after warming up, they were cool … We had to kill animals too?

I sat back, chewing on some bacon and thought how funny it was that we would kill zombie people without much thought, but stumbled when it came to animals. Even freaking zombie animals. I took a sip of juice because it was hard to swallow. And then Moonshine spoke up and I almost spewed. I’m not sure if the reaction was from humor or terror?
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
grasptheuniverse

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Australia
10/06/2012 10:15 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
I cant finish this amazing story as I am shit at writing stories but I love reading them and this was really interesting. Excellent writing skills.
caz
Turtles Voice (OP)
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10/07/2012 05:28 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
I cant finish this amazing story as I am shit at writing stories but I love reading them and this was really interesting. Excellent writing skills.
 Quoting: grasptheuniverse


Thank you hugs
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
oahf
User ID: 25138742
Netherlands
10/07/2012 05:36 PM
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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
And in the sahara i kneeld before niger and
Anonymous Coward
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10/07/2012 05:40 PM
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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
With my left hand stil up besides my belly looking at bigger monsters and washed niger away from his wurm babys.
Anonymous Coward
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10/07/2012 05:42 PM
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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Im deaf at my right ear now i think its a little messy but it still itches.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 25143966
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10/07/2012 05:55 PM
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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
Oh and after he gave others there own light back he or could finaly go on with grabbing his whatevers.
Turtles Voice (OP)
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10/07/2012 06:12 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
“Can you imagine a zombie owl? F….”. He glanced at Mrs. Williams and smiled. “Or a zombie cat? A raccoon? Je…” He paused. “Can you imagine? A zombie crow or hawk? A coyote? Freak! A Tiger?” He laughed and coughed. I think he was feeling the same emotion I was, torn between laughter and fear. He wiped his nose, took a sip of juice and bit into a biscuit.

“Wait a minute,” Highland said. “The zombies, the undead or whatever the hell we call them, they seem sleep in the day or burn into husks and they move at night, right? At least that is what we have discerned for,” he glanced at his watch, “the last twelve hours. So do the daylight creatures live at night and the nighttime creatures live in the day? And if humans can jump around like monkeys and lope like cats and tear out guts in seconds, what can nighttime predators do in the day?” He dropped his fork and sat back.

“We have to know what are daytime and nighttime predators, right?” Princess asked.

“Shit, skunks!! Can you imagine?” Rotten asked.

We laughed, we all laughed. Including Sully.

“Oh my!” Mrs. Williams grasped her chest and giggled. “Oh my!” She giggled again and the rest of us laughed harder.

Rotten rubbed that bit of hair on his chin that I hated. “Foxes are nocturnal, roaches, some lizards, owls and bats.” He raised his eyebrows and chuckled, “Bunnies and flying squirrels?” He laughed and we followed.

“We are so f …,” Princess wiped her eyes and giggled harder. “We’re in trouble, dudes!”

I almost fell out of my seat. Yes, zombies are bad, but zombie bunnies? I didn’t just laugh, I snorted and grabbed an additional napkin.

Rotten grew serious. “In the day, if Highland’s theory is true,” he cleared his throat “we have to look out for some dogs, cats, raccoons, skunks, a shit-ton of bugs, some lizards and snakes and oh fuck…” he held up his hand, “sorry Mrs. Williams, owls! And what if it begins to be transmitted through bugs, right?” He scratched his head. “What if a mosquito bites an infected dog? Does it become a zombie mosquito spreading it everywhere?” He threw himself back in the chair. “We are so,” he paused, “doomed.”

“No wonder you guys are crazy,” Sully spoke up from the end of the table. “You think too much. Thus far we know of what? A dog and some humans? We plan for that. Okay, a little protection in the day if we’re out and about may be overkill, but at least we’re prepared. But for today, we plan for humans.” He pushed his cleaned plate aside and stood from the table. “Mrs. Williams, do you have a wine glass?”

I swear I think she blushed. Those golden brown eyes had more power than I knew.

“Mom, that’s Professor Sully Kingswood, he teaches Dove English,” Highland introduced.

“Yes, Professor, I do,” she said, and stood up, looking totally 50s chic. We all rolled our eyes. What the hell?

“He’s right,” Moonshine spoke up, but whispering, slamming jelly onto his third biscuit. “Right now we prepare for humans, but shit fire,” he glanced at Mrs. Williams, “we can’t be prepared for zombie freaking cockroaches, rats and owls right now. If they come, well then they come, but damn! One threat at a time people.” He bit into his overflowing biscuit.

Sully emptied the bottle of wine into two very healthy glasses. Mrs. Williams picked one up, sniffed, turned up her nose and drank half of it. “When you kids are ready, we have some bodies to bury.”

We had a debate in the yard, heads in the grave or heads in a separate grave? Mrs. Williams had done a good job with her root shovel of disconnecting the heads and we studied.

“They’re zombies,” Princess said. “You can’t bury their heads with their bodies.”

Moonshine, already digging, finally conceded. “Mrs. Williams? Got another shovel?”

Rotten started on the fresh grave.

We fell into bed about noon. Princess and I were in one room upstairs and Moonshine and Rotten were downstairs on cots. Sully got the couch in the deceased Mr. Williams den. Highland had his room, his computers, and shortwave; I don’t think he slept at all that afternoon.

“Okay, this is what I learned today, the connection was crappy, but,” he began, bleary-eyed over a bowl of grits with sausage and cheese. “The highways are closed outside of Atlanta, Columbia, Charlotte and Jacksonville. Talked to a guy on shortwave, he’s in Charleston and looking to get out. He’s got supplies and plans, but since the roads are shut down, he’s at a loss as to what to do next. Talked to a family in Greenville, they’re ready to move and have a bus. They’d planned to go west, but with the road closures they don’t know what to do either. There are back roads …” he trailed off. “I don’t know.”

Mrs. Williams glanced at her son, her jaw tight and then pounded a metal spoon on the side of a glass bowl. “What do we know, troop?” she asked.

I rubbed my head, Princess checked the ends of her dreadlocks and Rotten rubbed that snatch of hair on his chin.

“What do zombies need?” She put the spoon in the bowl and stirred (what later became the best biscuits ever made).

“Food,” Highland muttered, his forehead in his hands.

“Three minutes without air, three days without water, three weeks without food. Finish your grits, kids, and go secure the upstairs.”



I worked with Rotten and we nailed big sheets of one-inch plywood over the windows and Princess worked with Moonshine. Highland was the boss and made sure everything was secure. Sully opened another bottle of wine and poured Mrs. Williams a glass.

“Is he flirting with her?” Princess whispered down the hall as we nailed up plywood. Highland had gone to check the radio.

I shrugged my shoulders and thought, what if he is? Mrs. Williams hadn’t had a date in twenty years. My mind boggled. I was twenty-three and had at least three sexual encounters a year. Yes, I’m not in a relationship, but damn – I’m just a girl. “Maybe,” I hedged. “Are you mad?”

She shrugged her shoulders and hammered harder. “No, I’m not mad.”

“Good,” I said and helped Rotten heave a piece of plywood up to cover the four by eight windows in the hall. “But maybe he is,” I said pulling the hammer out of my pocket and spitting a nail from my mouth.

Princess didn’t respond and we moved into the guest bedroom we shared. “She is pretty hot,” she said and pounded a nail into the frame of the window.

“Fifty’s chic,” I responded, holding the wood as Rotten hit the first nail.

“Yeah,” she sighed. “It’s all right.” She pounded in a nail. “I hate him anyway,” she laughed.

“I know,” I said and hammered.

“They just busted Cruise!” Highland burst in the room. “Oh my God!”

“Who? What?” Moonshine dropped off the ladder he’d been standing on. “What?”

“Cruise! Shortwave guy!” Highland took a breath. “The guy in Charleston that I’ve been talking to.”

“The zombies? What the fuck?” Rotten jumped off the ladder.

“No! Not the damned zombies, the freakin’ feds!” Highland grabbed his hair and paced. “Cops! I heard it happen! They busted in, they shouted this legal crap and there were gunshots.” He squatted in a corner and tugged his hair. “It wasn’t zombies! What the fuck?” He slid down the wall and landed hard on his ass.

“What the fuck?” Moonshine raced to him and dropped down at his side.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


[link to www.facebook.com (secure)]
Turtles Voice (OP)
Turtles bite...

User ID: 15791612
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10/07/2012 06:29 PM

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“Shit!” Princess dropped her hammer and ran to Highland’s side, falling to her knees.

“So you’re saying cops are killing survivors, Highland? That’s what you’re saying?” Rotten stared at him.

Highland rubbed his face. “Yes, that’s what I’m saying. I heard it, I heard a door break and someone scream something about the homeland and start shooting.”

“Why would cops kill survivors,” I asked. “That doesn’t make sense, right?” I polled them with my eyes.

Rotten sighed and sat down on the floor, reaching over to grab Highland’s foot and shake it gently in solidarity. “I’ve heard stuff, I’ve read stuff. Agendas and depopulation ideas.”

Rotten was a forum junky. He read from the time he woke up, until work. Granted, he usually didn’t wake up till noon and he sure didn’t work everyday. Rotten searched the bottom of the barrel, from prophecy and UFO sites to all manner of the end-of-the-world sites. We always said he was depressed, looking at that scary stuff all the time and anticipating the end of the world, but we listened.

“You know, we’re the useless eaters. The proles from 1984. Especially us,” he looked us each in the eye and laughed. “Especially us. Maybe this was planned, you know the fucking vaccine they made damn near everyone take. How’d you get out of it, Moon?” Rotten asked.

“You forged the paperwork, bro, you know that,” Moonshine said. “You even came up with a batch number that worked out.”

Rotten nodded. “And you, Dove, what about you?”

“I avoided it,” I stated simply.

“Sully!” Rotten jumped to his feet. “Sully!” He ran to the door and was met by Mrs. Williams and Sully with wineglasses in hand.

“What?” Sully snapped. “Are they here?”

“No! Did you take the vaccine the college was pushing? Did you?”

Sully looked at his alligator boots and sighed. “No, I didn’t. I was late the morning of my appointment, I had another set for this morning.”

“Mrs. Williams? Did you take it?” He was almost in her face.

“No, Reginald, I didn’t. Most of the ladies in church did and I know most of the people in the shelter did, but I didn’t. I didn’t trust it,” she chuckled and hid her wine glass behind her back. “I’ve been listening to you guys for too long.”

“Thank God!” Rotten slid down the wall beside Moonshine, Highland and Princess. “How long were you on shortwave with him, Highland?”

Highland rubbed his eyes. “Last time about twenty minutes, this morning?” He scratched his head. “A good forty or more.”

“Shit!” Rotten jumped to his feet. “They don’t want survivors!” He paced. “Oh my God! I knew you guys thought I was crazy, but I was studying. Fuck Dove, I sent you links, didn’t you read any of them?” He turned to me and although I’ve known him since we were kids and could kick his ass till 9th grade, he scared me.

“Some of them,” I said and looked down at the floor as though I had failed him.

“Which ones, Dove? Which ones? You’re smart, I need your help here, damn it!”

“Jesus, Rot, I don’t remember! I read some of them, I watched some of the videos – I’m taking a full course load, I’m lucky if I remember to eat and feed Princess.”

“Fuck you, Dove,” Rotten paced.

“Yeah, Dove, that wasn’t nice.” Princess stood up and paced with Rotten.

I felt like shit. I knew they considered me smart, even Highland did at times, and I had failed them. “I’m sorry, guys. Let me think.” I stood up and paced between them in the space between the bed and wall. I reached out and touched Princess’s arm, “I’m sorry,” I whispered.

She nodded her head sharply and I knew it wasn’t okay. Princess had been through more than I, or any of our friends, could comprehend. At fourteen, our first night truly drunk together, she told me she believed that pedophiles could see a sign on her head and sought her out. She then started naming people from our school and community. Teachers I liked and others in our small community. I wanted, even in my stoned drunkenness to call her a liar, but I knew she wasn’t.

All of our group had been protected, I had well off parents and a trust fund. Rotten’s parents were probably richer than my own, but they were hippies so no one really knew. Moonshine’s folks were still attentive to him even after his dad’s business bankrupted and they moved to a trailer park and his dad started a lawn care business, Moonshine never wanted for anything – everybody loved the big, sweet, curly-headed guy. And Highland had Mrs. Williams, who before the apocalypse seemed like a dumb-blonde at times, but after … wow!
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

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My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
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Turtles Voice (OP)
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10/07/2012 06:34 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
And then there was Princess. Yes, it’s her legitimate name. Like I said, I’ve seen her birth certificate. She didn’t know much about her birthparents – she couldn’t really remember. I met her in 3rd grade when we were eight years old and her parents had died a month earlier. She should have remembered, but she couldn’t. She lived with foster parents and had an 11pm curfew every night except weekends when it was 2am – she was eight years old.

Yes, I’ve been taking care of Princess since then and we’ve had more sleepovers than I can remember over the years. I shouldn’t have said what I said. I was stressed, but it was no excuse.

I grabbed her hand and led her to the hall where we had more room to pace. I started muttering out loud, which I do silently during tests when I’m calling up information I have read. The hall was huge and Rotten told me later – great acoustics.

“Zombies … depopulation … agendas …” I paced and Princess held my hand and kept up. I stopped. “I saw the vids, Rotten, I read some of the articles. Help me!” I said as the rest of them followed us into the hall.

Rotten stared out through a little hole cut out of the center of the plywood that covered the windows – a place to observe or shoot. He and Highland had evidently had more discussions than the rest of us.

“Since I have entered politics, I have chiefly had men’s views confided to me privately. Some of the biggest men in the United States, in the field of commerce and manufacture are afraid of something. They know there is a power somewhere so organized, so subtle, so watchful, so interlocked, so complete, so pervasive, that they better not speak above their breath when they speak in condemnation of it. That was President Wilson in about 1913. I think that is what Rotten is expecting you to get,” Highland said.

“Good memory, dude,” Rotten said and pulled away from the hole in the thick plywood. “This isn’t a movie and we can’t expect anyone to save us. The vaccine did this and everyone who had a real job, was in school, or on welfare or social security was expected to get it. This was planned. It isn’t the government or the politicians; it’s something above anything we can see. Fuck,” he said and Mrs. Williams didn’t even correct him. “Think about it, if a president was afraid of whatever it is, it’s freaking real.”

“For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places,” Princess said and squeezed my hand.

“You’re quoting the Bible again, Princess. How’s that been working for you?” Sully asked and lifted the wineglass to his lips.

She moved so quick I could not have tightened my grip if I had wanted to. One second she was standing beside me and the next she was shoving the wineglass into Sully’s face. I swear looking back it happened in half a second – it certainly couldn’t have been longer.

Next thing we all knew Sully was down on the ground and holding his face. I could see blood spilling over his fingers.

“Jesus, P!” Moonshine yelled.

“What the fuck?” Rotten ran to the fallen man.

“Oh my God,” I whispered.

“Wayne, first aid kit!” Mrs. Williams spoke and even though she spoke softly, we calmed. “Boys,” she instructed Moonshine and Rotten, “take him to my room. Girls, go get some water and rags. In the linen closet,” she pointed.

We did as we were told and as freaked as we were, I don’t think a word was spoken.

Mrs. Williams sent the boys away to finish covering the windows and had Princess and I stay in the room. We placed towels from her bathroom under Sully’s head and she poured both alcohol and peroxide over his wounds. He screamed.

She pulled out a needle and some thread that she sterilized in alcohol and turned to Princess. “Tell me what happened,” she said.

And as Princess described the relationship she had with Sully in her freshman year, Mrs. Williams stitched up the cuts in Sully’s face. At first Sully screamed and then he tried to fight, but Princess and I held him down while she continued to talk. Finally, he calmed and Princess finished her story.

“That’s just terrible, Princess,” Mrs. Williams said, gently covering Sully’s stitches with some crème from the first aid kit. “Just terrible.” She set gauze over the cuts, measured the tape and applied it, conscious of Sully’s pain. “You’re going to be okay, Sully.” She smiled.

We met back down in the kitchen; it was just growing dark outside. “Sully’s asleep, I gave him a couple pain pills,” Mrs. Williams said, setting plates of carved meat, cheese and condiments on the table. “You shouldn’t have hit him, Princess, but I understand.” She rubbed Princess’s shoulder and set down a couple loaves of bread. “Reginald, why were you asking Wayne about the time he spent on shortwave?”

Rotten jolted as though he had been shocked. “What the…” he hit the side of his head with his palm. “If they busted that guy, Highland, how do you think they got him? Was it the time he spent on the radio? I damned sure know they can track that sh..., f…” he glanced at Mrs. Williams.

“Shit!” Highland said. “Sorry, Mom. We both know they can track communication.” Highland jumped to his feet. “We have to go and soon.”

“Well, we can’t go tonight,” Mrs. Williams said, setting juice, milk and jugs of water on the table. “Sully needs rest and it’s almost dark.”

“She’s right,” I said, finally finding my voice. I was still in shock that Princess shoved that delicate wine glass in Sully’s face and I was having trouble forgetting the open wounds that Mrs. Williams probed and picked bits of glass from with tweezers. The zombies were bad, my mom all shriveled up in front of the church was horrible, but somehow, Sully was worse. “We should leave in the morning. But where? The roads are closed to go west and all that’s east is ocean.” I bit into a chunk of cheese wrapped in ham.

“We’ll go to Uncle Paul’s,” Mrs. Williams said, settling at the table. “Up at the lake.”

“Mom, we can’t go to Uncle Paul’s, he’s dead and his kids own the place – they sold it.” Highland said and paced.

“No, they didn’t. The deal fell through. We’ll go to Uncle Paul’s. I grew up there, Wayne. I know that area and I believe I know a place where we’ll be safe until the sick ones run out of energy.”

Highland stopped and looked at his mother across the table. “The island?” he whispered.

She nodded her head. “Let’s get rid of the perishables tonight, kids, we’re leaving at sun up.”

“How far?” Rotten asked.

“Forty-five miles on the highway, less on back roads,” Highland said and glanced at his mom. “And less by foot.” He sat down at the table, and piled some meat on his plate. “Even less on foot.”

“What are we talking? Thirty or thity-five miles on foot?” Moonshine asked.

“I don’t know, it’s never the same,” Highland said and glanced at his mother again.

“Can we make thirty miles in a day?” Princess asked, looking at a piece of beef suspiciously, but then finally putting it in her mouth.

“People can run a mile in minutes,” Rotten said. “There’s lots of minutes in a day.”

“But we have to carry stuff,” Moonshine said. “Food and guns and do we have any freaking guns besides Mrs. Williams shotgun? It’s the zombie, f… um … apocalypse!”

“We have guns,” Highland said.

“How are we going to carry enough food to last us for weeks over thirty miles on foot in a single day?” Moonshine asked. “We’re seven folks! And what about water? And what if the zombies don’t run out of food for six weeks? Then we’ll have to be prepared for at least nine or twelve weeks. And somehow we’re supposed to carry that much food in a day and hang out on an island for a few months?” Moonshine jumped from the table and punched the wall.

Princess kicked me. “Whose turn is it?”

I pointed at her. I was pretty sure I got the last one.

Princess jumped up from the table and everyone stilled. She was pretty scary after what she did to Sully. “Do you want to whine, live or die?” She poked Moonshine in the chest, which would have been humorous at any other time – considering he stood more than a foot taller and was a good hundred pounds heavier. “Do you want to live or do you want to bitch that’s it’s too damn hard to live? Really? I’m asking?” She pushed him in a corner. I had to say, even without the heels and the short skirt, she rocked. Princess had no fear, or perhaps, she had every fear.

Moonshine threw his hands in the air. “Back off, P. I don’t want to hurt you!”

“You’re gonna hurt me, Moon?” She put her hands on her hips. “Me?” she asked.

And damn if she didn’t look tiny next to him.

“Shit!” Moonshine turned into the wall and restrained his hand from punching it. “All right! We’re walking into the wilderness with enough food and water to last months, oh joy, joy, I’m on board!”

Princess winked at me, sat down at the table and studied more protein in the form of meat.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
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Turtles Voice (OP)
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10/07/2012 06:48 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
The rest of the meal was in silence. We all knew we had to be ready to go as soon as the sun rose. There was too much to think about and right before the sun hit the horizon Highland took us downstairs and distributed guns. We each got a rifle and a .45. We looked at the trunks filled with guns that Highland had in the basement in amazement. Like I said, we didn’t know Highland.

The only shooting most of us had done was on video games. Highland explained how to unlock our weapon and commented that shooting was much the same as the games we’d grown up with, but warned to be prepared for a kick. We were sent upstairs and Mrs. Williams hit the electrical panel to kill all the power.

We didn’t know the agendas of a zombie. We were pretty sure they couldn’t hear, but we knew that they could see. We didn’t know if they could smell us out, but we were almost certain they had memories and returned to places (and perhaps people?) they once knew or were attached to.

Moonshine and Princess took the hall, we all figured Moonshine didn’t need to be alone and Princess was the toughest one of us to handle him at the moment. Highland took his own room, Rotten took the guest bedroom and I ended up the bathroom of Mrs. Williams room. Sully was knocked out on the bed and Mrs. Williams was in another window.

We watched and waited and saw nothing through the little openings in the plywood. My muscles were growing stiff from standing in the bathtub and Sully had begun to mutter in his drunken and pain-pilled sleep. “I don’t see anything,” I muttered. “Nothing and it’s nearly midnight.”

”I know,” Mrs. Williams whispered from the other room. “And frankly, as dark as it is, what could we see?”

She left her post and called us into the hall. “We need light, not a lot, but at least something.” She looked at Highland.

“Yard lights?” he asked.

“There could be forty million zombies out there right now, but all I see is black. I think she’s right,” Princess said.

Rotten nodded. “There’s no moon and hardly any lights from the town, I can’t see sh… a thing.”

“All right. Dove, come on.” He headed to the stairs.

I followed; I don’t know why he picked me. I’d left my rifle in the bathtub, but had the .45 in my hand.

When we reached the first floor and the door that led to the basement and the electrical switches, he spoke. “Do you think we have this figured out right?”

He clicked on a flashlight and descended into the darkness. “Seems like, Highland,” I said, following him. “I mean if they’re killing survivors we have to go. And your mom’s right, I can’t see shit out there, it’s pitch dark out there. It was never this dark when we were kids. There’s no street lights, no lights from town, no lights from other houses hardly.”

“Mom and I used to go to Uncle Paul’s a lot when I was a kid, almost every weekend for years. I guess he wasn’t really my uncle.” He stopped by the electrical box and focused the flashlight on the floor. “I don’t know what he was, but I know we weren’t really related. I never saw them in any other way than casual, like brother and sister, and if they slept together I sure didn’t know.” He squatted down, turned off the flashlight and whispered.

“We’d take the highway and I’d watch the time because mom told me too. And we’d take the back roads and I’d watch the time, again because she told me to. She even bought me a little notebook so I could record it all, and a map of the area, which she hung on my wall. Later, she gave me a really nice watch so I could use the stopwatch from our driveway to Uncle Paul’s. By highway, depending on traffic, it was fifty to sixty-five minutes. Backs roads were forty to forty-five and walking …,” he sighed. “Could be as little as ten or as much as a solid day. I’ve looked at the map and I studied the watch. There’s no possible way to do it in ten, but we have.”

What do you say to that? Okay, there are zombies and now a Stephen King short story is being told to me as reality. “We’re walking, Highland, we’ve agreed.” I didn’t know what else to say.

“I know, Dove, but I’ve studied the map, it’s a good thirty miles as the crow files to Uncle Paul’s cabin and we did it in ten. Not just once or twice, but many times.” He handed me the flashlight and hit a switch, lighting the basement. “Run up stairs, get in place and I’ll hit the outdoor lights.”
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
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10/07/2012 06:52 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
I did as he said and joined Mrs. Williams in the bedroom. Just as I raised my gun, and peeped through the hole left for me, he hit the lights. I could see the back yard clearing to the edge of the security fence. “We’re cooking with fire, now,” I said and waited.

“Got one! Um, two!” Moonshine bellowed from the hall. I ran to look and Mrs. Williams waved me on.

I took to the window beside where Princess and Moonshine held their posts. Rotten took the far window. We looked out to see a man rolling and a woman doing cartwheels down the road.

“Jesus,” Princess whispered and raised her rifle.

“Don’t shoot unless they threaten us,” Rotten said.

“Really, then what the hell are we doing?” Princess dropped her rifle to her side and pulled her eye from the hole in the plywood.

“Haven’t you done enough, P?” Rotten jerked his head to indicate the room where Sully lay. “You’ll get your chance, just chill. We shoot when they threaten us – not before.”

“He’s right,” Highland said. “We conserve ammunition.”

“Look!” Mrs. Williams nearly screamed from the bedroom.

We ran, all of us, we were horrible soldiers.

“Look,” she exclaimed again and giggled that silly laugh we all loved.

We fell into the bedroom, almost fighting among ourselves to be the first to see. There were five of us and we worked it out, grudgingly. We shared the small holes in the plywood, Rotten and me shared the bathroom, Princess and Moonshine took one window and Highland shared the other with his mom.

“Oh my,” Mrs. Williams giggled.

I took my turn at the hole and saw cats – lots of cats, perched on the security fence. Before Rotten elbowed me away for his own turn, I saw cats in the yard sitting like little meatloaves inside the light and staring into the darkness, alert, but relaxed.

“Wow,” I muttered.

Mrs. Williams giggled again and ran to the hall, peering out through the windows we had abandoned.

Everyone ran, but I took another look through the window to see three crows land in the yard and none of the cats even acknowledged the birds as they studied the darkness on the other side of the fence. I giggled too and then ran to the hall.

“What the fuck?” Moonshine muttered and then apologized to Mrs. Williams.

“Hell, yeah!” Princess laughed and hugged Moonshine, slapping him on the back.

Rotten gave up his view and looked at me in confusion, his eyebrows raised.

I pushed my eye to the view and felt the giggle growing inside me expand. I wasn’t snorting, I was giggling like I was a kid again. As I stared out into the yard, I saw predators and prey together. I saw songbirds and hawks, bunnies and cats and dogs, both domestic and wild and I think I even saw a turtle and some snakes. They were coming into the light of the yard despite the fact that many of them were nocturnal. I won’t say they formed complete circles around the house, but after running from window to window and peering down from the second floor, it sure looked like it.

Princess was giggling and crying, Highland settled into a corner and pulled his hair, I think trying to figure it out, and Rotten looked out through all the windows and didn’t say a word. Moonshine stared and didn’t move as he gazed into the front yard as a deer settled beside the stepping stones that led to Mrs. Williams flower garden.

Sully appeared in the bedroom doorway, bandages over and under one eye and a larger bandage on his cheek. “What’s going on?” he asked, leaning against the door jam.

Mrs. Williams rushed to him and, holding his arm gently and whispering encouragement sweetly, she helped him to the window. “Look,” she said.

He watched for several moments without saying a word and then sighed.

“It’s freaking Noah’s Ark, man!” Moonshine giggled. “Look at them,” he giggled harder and fell to his knees; his laughter turning to tears. None of us rushed to him this time as our own giggles, struggles and ponderings also devolved into a good cry.

“Wow,” I said and wiped my eyes as the tears subsided. I looked at my friends and saw the same shaking, tearful, wonder I just had experienced written on their faces.

“I know,” Princess smiled and sniffed.

Highland stood up, not wiping his own tears away and ran to the window. He peered out for half a second, it couldn’t have been any more than that, and screamed, “Guns, threat, guns!”

We ran to our stations as Highland raised his rifle and shot, breaking the glass on the outside of the plywood. Princess took the next shot and by the time the third shot came I was stumbling into the tub and peering into the backyard. Two were in the yard, and from my lone perspective, two more were on the fence. I worried about what Rotten and Mrs. Williams were seeing on the other side of the yard when I took my first shot, shattering the stained glass window that I had admired since I was a child.

I missed. I shot again and saw the woman’s head tip back. She fell to the ground right beside the yellow lab that she had been pursuing. The dog scuttled back on his hind legs and bumped into a raccoon. The raccoon scooted over a bit and gave the dog some room. I took my next shot, focusing now and not worried about what the others were doing. I focused on the videos games we played as children and lined up my next shot.

I pulled the trigger and the old man in pajamas, sucking on a squirrel as though it was a lollypop, dropped. I focused on the fence, but no one was there. I pulled my eye away and saw an elderly woman swinging from a tree branch, she wore a yellow dress and for a moment I thought of my mom, and then I noticed the blood stains around the collar. I focused and fired. She fell from the branch and the animals below her scuttled away, each making room for the other.

I heard the others firing, dogs barking, cats crying and studied on the yard. I couldn’t see any movement, nothing coming towards me, and then I looked down into the yard. All the animals were looking at me, or I should say, looking right above my little hole onto the world. I pulled out the pistol and when the face appeared, just a kid with pieces of furry flesh hanging from his teeth, I fired. The animals below had been watching and had already made room for his descent.

“Light!” Highland screamed from the hall. “We need more light!”

“Light’s attracting them!” Moonshine bellowed.

“The light is saving the animals,” Mrs. Williams declared. “Sully!” Mrs. Williams bellowed behind me at her station at the window. “Sully, take this gun and shoot those bastards.” I heard Sully slip into the room on unsteady feet. “Take it,” she demanded. And then I heard her heels run into the hall and down the stairs.

It seemed like merely seconds that she made it to the basement and hit the switch that lit the bottom floor and the rest of the yard lights. The house was suddenly a beacon in the night.

“Fuck!” Moonshine yelled. “What is she doing?”

“Shut up, Moon!” Princess snapped, in a whisper. “She knows what she’s doing.”

I heard a couple more shots and then I heard Mrs. Williams’ pounding feet on the bottom floor and the distinctive sound of the front door unsealing from the weather stripping. I wasn’t the only one either, because I heard gasps from the rest of the house.

“What is she doing?” Rotten barked from his position in the guest room.

“Mom!” Highland whispered as loud as he could.

I heard her run again and then, the familiar sound of the sliding glass door opening. I glanced down below and saw the animals moving in lines towards the access. I truly couldn’t believe what I was seeing.

I heard a couple more shots from the hall and I wanted to run to see but I remained focused and saw an owl fly into the yard and land on the branch outside the window. It made brief eye contact with me and then studied the yards outside of the light. The owl screamed like a woman in pain and then turned it’s head away from me and looked at the very edge of the fence that hid the air conditioning unit from the street. It made that ungodly noise again and then a man dressed in a uniform appeared, perched like a cat on the edge of the fence.

I fired again and luckily he fell out of the fenced yard.

“Is that a mountain lion?” Princess squeaked from the hall.

“Prolly,” I laughed as the owl outside of the window preened its feathers.

“I got foxes!” Rotten said and laughed.

Highland giggled. “I’ve got turkeys. Freaking turkeys!”

“Shoot, Sully!” Mrs. Williams yelled at the sliding glass door in the dining room, right below the master bedroom.

We ran, all of us deserting our places again. I heard a dog growl as I ran to the window, elbowing Rotten out of the way, and saw six of them in the yard. A pit mix grabbed the throat of one of the undead, tearing away the meat and the head bounced a couple times and landed on the grave we had dug earlier and had placed the other heads of the dead zombies. The dog fell to the ground for a moment and shuddered. He then came to life … or something. He seemed to grow before my eyes, he became bigger, stronger and drool dropped off his teeth. His demeanor changed, it almost seemed as though his jaws grew bigger, thicker and more deadly, but that could have been my imagination. I raised the rifle and fired. The dog fell. “Fuck!” I yelled.

A little girl dropped on the patio, her Hello Kitty pajamas stained in brown. She attempted to grab a black cat, but it darted out of her path so she settled on a possum that she tore into like a taco. The animal screamed and I heard two shots, one crumpling the girl and the other knocking the animal from her hands before she hit the ground.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
[link to www.amazon.com]


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10/07/2012 07:06 PM

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Re: Got A Zombie Story ...
“Windows, people!” Highland yelled and I heard his feet pounding on the stairs.

I ran back to the bathroom and passed Sully. He stood in the corner beside the window Mrs. Williams had given him to protect. The barrel of the rifle was under his chin. I stopped and almost felt like I had been transformed to one of those below us eating animals.

“Really?” I bellowed. “Are you serious? Is this what you’re gonna do?” I wanted to hit him. I ran to his window and peered down on the yard, more animals were coming in and I saw cardinal sitting next to eagle on the patio. I ran to the bathroom and checked. It was calm.

I went back to the window Sully cowered by and I heard scuttling on the roof. “Incoming,” I yelled. I heard later that it was the local sheriff, blood-stained and chewing on a hand that the others believed was his wife’s. Moonshine took him down.

“Rotten!” Highland screamed from downstairs, as I shot a woman dressed in yoga clothes and chasing a rabbit.

“Jesus!” I yelled and focused on the fence line as I heard Rotten’s feet pounding on the stairs.

“No you don’t!” I heard Highland shout and then the sharp blast of a .45.

I heard Rotten fall and curse. “Animals!” He regained his footing and I heard him fire.

“Good one,” Princess giggled and opened up. “Kill the fucking lights!!”

I knocked down two climbing the fence and turned and slapped Sully. I almost felt bad about it. I know Princess messed him up, but at least I didn’t slap that side. “Wake the fuck up!” I screamed in his face and grabbed the rifle from under his chin and slammed it in his chest. “Wake up!” I yelled again. His fingers closed around the gun and I ran to the bathroom. I looked into the yard and saw nothing except some pigeons landing on the fence.

I ran back through the room and was pleased to see Sully looking through the hole in the plywood and holding the gun as though he may actually use it. I passed Moonshine and Princess in the hall and hit the window Rotten had left when he ran downstairs. I stared down into the yard, studied the fence line and saw nothing. I heard shouts from downstairs and a few more rounds going off.

I studied the patio.

I heard another round and Rotten scream.

My belly clenched up tight. No! I thought. Not Rotten!

“Got him, dude!” Highland laughed. “Did you shit your pants? I would have.” A body rolled on the patio and the sliding glass door slammed.

“Front, front!” Moonshine yelled and I heard rounds going off.

I ran out of the guest room Princess and I shared and took my place at one of the four windows. I almost wet my pants as I saw what was coming in the yard. “Lights!” I screamed. “Fucking lights!” I fired, the first was a lady in a cute pink dress, okay, a viciously stained dress, but pink. The second was a pastor, white collar and all. The third was a lady in nursing scrubs. “Lights!” I yelled again.

“On it!” I heard Highland scream as the front door slammed. “On it!”

Half a dozen blue birds landed on the branch outside the window and wrapped their wings around each other and cowered and shivered.

A child appeared beside the birds, hanging on one arm from the branch of a pecan tree, he couldn’t have been more than three. His pajamas, full of colorfully illustrated cars and trucks, looked a hundred years old, brown and sullied. He smiled at me; he smiled. His teeth were speckled with blood and flesh, yet they still looked crisp and white as any child’s teeth appear. He grinned and grabbed one of the birds and bit into it as though it was ice cream on a hot summer day. I pulled the pistol and knocked that crazy bastard out of the tree. I looked below and the animals that hadn’t made it into the house were forming new circles, but they dodged the body and blood from the monkey-acting, bird-eating kid.

What were we to do with animals? We couldn’t save them all. I wanted to tear down the plywood and let the blue birds in the house. I couldn’t do that. As much as I wanted to save them, I couldn’t risk everyone else.

The lights went out and I both was grateful and afraid. A few seconds later the solar garden lights turned on and I strained to see down in the yard. I saw foxes, cats, birds, a couple skunks and a few possums crowding the bit of light on the lawn.

“Candles, kids,” Mrs. Williams called up the stairs.

We lit the candles and using the light I checked on Sully. He had dropped his rifle to his side, but he still stared into the yard. “The a… a… animals,” he stuttered. I pulled him away and looked. The owl had moved onto the grill and on the patio was rodents, gerbils or mice or rats, I didn’t know what they were, they all looked the same to me. And sitting on the patio table was the black cat that had survived the jaws of the zombie girl in Hello Kitty pjs.

I felt bad for Sully. I lit the candle that Mrs. Williams had left and pushed it in his hands. “First battle, Sully. We survived.”

“Thanks,” he said. “I shot one.” He pointed to the fence line and I saw a crumpled woman in shorts and a gray sports bra.

I rubbed his shoulder. The rest of us had had a crappy day, but somehow I understood that it was worse for Sully. The rest of us had been planning since we were kids – Sully never had a clue that it could happen.
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

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My Novel,(yes, I wrote a book) Kicking The Goat Silly
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