Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 2,424 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 8,736
Pageviews Today: 13,897Threads Today: 5Posts Today: 62
12:05 AM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

"The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain

 
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/09/2012 07:15 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
I, the op might be a dickhead, that doesn't mean all germans are like me.



 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25123144


^^THIS message is the whole purpose of my ramblings.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/09/2012 07:16 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
"I went often to look at the collection of curiosities in Heidelberg Castle, and one day I surprised the keeper of it with my German. I spoke entirely in that language. He was greatly interested; and after I had talked a while he said my German was very rare, possibly a "unique"; and wanted to add it to his museum.

If he had known what it had cost me to acquire my art, he would also have known that it would break any collector to buy it. Harris and I had been hard at work on our German during several weeks at that time, and although we had made good progress, it had been accomplished under great difficulty and annoyance, for three of our teachers had died in the mean time. A person who has not studied German can form no idea of what a perplexing language it is.

Surely there is not another language that is so slipshod and systemless, and so slippery and elusive to the grasp. One is washed about in it, hither and thither, in the most helpless way; and when at last he thinks he has captured a rule which offers firm ground to take a rest on amid the general rage and turmoil of the ten parts of speech, he turns over the page and reads, "Let the pupil make careful note of the following exceptions." He runs his eye down and finds that there are more exceptions to the rule than instances of it. So overboard he goes again, to hunt for another Ararat and find another quicksand. Such has been, and continues to be, my experience. Every time I think I have got one of these four confusing "cases" where I am master of it, a seemingly insignificant preposition intrudes itself into my sentence, clothed with an awful and unsuspected power, and crumbles the ground from under me. For instance, my book inquires after a certain bird -- (it is always inquiring after things which are of no sort of consequence to anybody): "Where is the bird?" Now the answer to this question -- according to the book -- is that the bird is waiting in the blacksmith shop on account of the rain. Of course no bird would do that, but then you must stick to the book. Very well, I begin to cipher out the German for that answer. I begin at the wrong end, necessarily, for that is the German idea. I say to myself, "Regen (rain) is masculine -- or maybe it is feminine -- or possibly neuter -- it is too much trouble to look now. Therefore, it is either der (the) Regen, or die (the) Regen, or das (the) Regen, according to which gender it may turn out to be when I look. In the interest of science, I will cipher it out on the hypothesis that it is masculine. Very well -- then the rain is der Regen, if it is simply in the quiescent state of being mentioned, without enlargement or discussion -- Nominative case; but if this rain is lying around, in a kind of a general way on the ground, it is then definitely located, it is doing something -- that is, resting (which is one of the German grammar's ideas of doing something), and this throws the rain into the Dative case, and makes it dem Regen. However, this rain is not resting, but is doing something actively, -- it is falling -- to interfere with the bird, likely -- and this indicates movement, which has the effect of sliding it into the Accusative case and changing dem Regen into den Regen." Having completed the grammatical horoscope of this matter, I answer up confidently and state in German that the bird is staying in the blacksmith shop "wegen (on account of) den Regen." Then the teacher lets me softly down with the remark that whenever the word "wegen" drops into a sentence, it always throws that subject into the Genitive case, regardless of consequences -- and that therefore this bird stayed in the blacksmith shop "wegen des Regens.""


[link to www.crossmyt.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25123144
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 24966437
South Africa
10/09/2012 07:19 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Ah.. Deutsch, die Sprache der Liebe.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 998738


...and Lieder. Especially Schubert's Lieder.


hf
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 24966437
South Africa
10/09/2012 07:20 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
And by the way, isn't English also a Germanic language?!
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/09/2012 07:25 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
how do you say, "I want to butt hump an aardvark" in German?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 3960495


English --> German

"I want to butt hump an aardvark" --> "Ich möchte ein Erdferkel bumsen:"
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 24966437
South Africa
10/09/2012 07:25 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Ah.. Deutsch, die Sprache der Liebe.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 998738


Zwei Holländer besteigen einen Flug nach London. Einer nimmt den Fensterplatz, der andere setzt sich neben ihn auf den mittleren Platz. Kurz vor dem Start setzt sich ein Deutscher auf den Platz am Gang.

Nach dem Start zieht der Deutsche seine Schuhe aus, wackelt mit seinen Zehen und macht es sich gemütlich, als der Holländer auf dem Fensterplatz sagt: "Entschuldigen Sie, ich muss aufstehen und mir eine Cola holen."

"Bleiben Sie ruhig sitzen", sagt der Deutsche, "ich sitze am Gang. Ich hol' Ihnen Ihre Cola."

Kaum ist er aufgestanden, nimmt einer der Holländer einen seiner Schuhe und spuckt hinein. Als er mit der Cola zurückkehrt, sagt der andere Holländer: "Das sieht gut aus, ich hätte auch gerne eine." Wieder erklärt sich der Deutsche bereit, sie zu holen. Als er weg ist, nimmt der andere Holländer den anderen Schuh und spuckt ebenfalls hinein. Als der Deutsche zurückkommt, lehnen sie sich alle zurück und genießen den Flug.

Als das Flugzeug zur Landung ansetzt, zieht der Deutsche seine Schuhe an und bemerkt sofort was passiert ist.

"Warum nur?" fragt er, "Wie lange wird das noch weitergehen? Dieser Kampf zwischen unseren Nationen. Dieser Hass. Diese Animositäten. Dieses In-die-Schuhe-Spucken und In-die-Cola-Pissen."
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 976158





cruise
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/09/2012 07:26 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Ah.. Deutsch, die Sprache der Liebe.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 998738


Zwei Holländer besteigen einen Flug nach London. Einer nimmt den Fensterplatz, der andere setzt sich neben ihn auf den mittleren Platz. Kurz vor dem Start setzt sich ein Deutscher auf den Platz am Gang.

Nach dem Start zieht der Deutsche seine Schuhe aus, wackelt mit seinen Zehen und macht es sich gemütlich, als der Holländer auf dem Fensterplatz sagt: "Entschuldigen Sie, ich muss aufstehen und mir eine Cola holen."

"Bleiben Sie ruhig sitzen", sagt der Deutsche, "ich sitze am Gang. Ich hol' Ihnen Ihre Cola."

Kaum ist er aufgestanden, nimmt einer der Holländer einen seiner Schuhe und spuckt hinein. Als er mit der Cola zurückkehrt, sagt der andere Holländer: "Das sieht gut aus, ich hätte auch gerne eine." Wieder erklärt sich der Deutsche bereit, sie zu holen. Als er weg ist, nimmt der andere Holländer den anderen Schuh und spuckt ebenfalls hinein. Als der Deutsche zurückkommt, lehnen sie sich alle zurück und genießen den Flug.

Als das Flugzeug zur Landung ansetzt, zieht der Deutsche seine Schuhe an und bemerkt sofort was passiert ist.

"Warum nur?" fragt er, "Wie lange wird das noch weitergehen? Dieser Kampf zwischen unseren Nationen. Dieser Hass. Diese Animositäten. Dieses In-die-Schuhe-Spucken und In-die-Cola-Pissen."
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 976158


chuckle
•••Weltschmerz•••

User ID: 14081264
Germany
10/09/2012 07:27 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Best. Thread. Ever.
But I must admit, I like the german language. And if you think it's hard to master... Try hungarian. Some say it is related to sumerian. Very complex and very well-sounding.

German-dialect-wise, I love the franconian dialect. It sounds a lot like english, and if you're deeply into it, no other german can understand a word u'r sayin :)
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 18942840
Canada
10/09/2012 07:35 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
I took 2 semesters of German in night classes before I traveled to Europe. I could order my food and ask for directions -- but beyond the basics I am still lost. It is a very complicated language.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 24966437
South Africa
10/09/2012 07:35 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
German his given us some beautiful words:

Weltschmerz
Weltanschauung
Daseinsberechtigung
Feindberuhrung
Fingerspitzengefühl
Das Ding an Sich
Klangfarbe
Materialschlacht
Kampfbereit
Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgese​tz
Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän
Schadefreude
Frühlingserwachen
Hottentottenpotentatentantenattentat
Frontkameradschaft
Backpfeifengesicht
Sauerkraut
Ampelmännchen
Fahrvergnügen
Aha-Erlebnis
Vergangenheitsbewältigung
Vernichtungsgedanke
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1273864


Kindergarten
•••Weltschmerz•••

User ID: 14081264
Germany
10/09/2012 07:38 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
German his given us some beautiful words:

Weltschmerz
Weltanschauung
Daseinsberechtigung
Feindberuhrung
Fingerspitzengefühl
Das Ding an Sich
Klangfarbe
Materialschlacht
Kampfbereit
Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgese​tz
Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän
Schadefreude
Frühlingserwachen
Hottentottenpotentatentantenattentat
Frontkameradschaft
Backpfeifengesicht
Sauerkraut
Ampelmännchen
Fahrvergnügen
Aha-Erlebnis
Vergangenheitsbewältigung
Vernichtungsgedanke
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1273864


Kindergarten
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437


Zeitgeist
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 25213002
Germany
10/09/2012 07:38 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
I'm lucky I've been born here. Took me around 30 years to get to my current level of English and it would have been an impossible task for me to learn German as a foreign language. Our grammar is insane, just like French. Thankfully, as children we learn language by magic, and not through books.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 24966437
South Africa
10/09/2012 08:07 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
German his given us some beautiful words:

Weltschmerz
Weltanschauung
Daseinsberechtigung
Feindberuhrung
Fingerspitzengefühl
Das Ding an Sich
Klangfarbe
Materialschlacht
Kampfbereit
Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgese​tz
Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän
Schadefreude
Frühlingserwachen
Hottentottenpotentatentantenattentat
Frontkameradschaft
Backpfeifengesicht
Sauerkraut
Ampelmännchen
Fahrvergnügen
Aha-Erlebnis
Vergangenheitsbewältigung
Vernichtungsgedanke
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1273864


Kindergarten
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437


Zeitgeist
 Quoting: •••Weltschmerz•••



Gotterdammerung - sorry, don't know how to do the umlaut on the keyboard.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 25213002
Germany
10/09/2012 08:59 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Gotterdammerung - sorry, don't know how to do the umlaut on the keyboard.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437

There's a very easy replacement for German umlauts:

ä = ae
ö = oe
ü = ue


So just write "Goetterdaemmerung" and you're perfect. :-)
Thor's Hamster

User ID: 1248699
United States
10/09/2012 09:07 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
BLASPHEMY!!!
Apollo astronauts couldn't have passed through Van Allen's Belt. Van Allen wore suspenders.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 24966437
South Africa
10/09/2012 05:13 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Gotterdammerung - sorry, don't know how to do the umlaut on the keyboard.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437

There's a very easy replacement for German umlauts:

ä = ae
ö = oe
ü = ue


So just write "Goetterdaemmerung" and you're perfect. :-)
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25213002



hf
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/10/2012 02:54 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Saxonion dialect is the best.


 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25185095


I wonder why in saxon schools they are trying to drive it out of young students and keep them from speaking the dialect.

They want the students to speak all High German (Hochdeutsch).



When you look at other areas of Germany, Bavaria for instance, the Bavarian students will be aloud to speak Bavarian in school and even the teachers might speak the dialect.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/10/2012 02:57 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain



I wonder why in saxonian* schools they are trying to drive it out of young students and keep them from speaking the dialect.



*corrected
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/10/2012 03:00 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Gotterdammerung - sorry, don't know how to do the umlaut on the keyboard.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437

There's a very easy replacement for German umlauts:

ä = ae
ö = oe
ü = ue


So just write "Goetterdaemmerung" and you're perfect. :-)
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25213002


May I add:


ß = ss


hf
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/10/2012 03:25 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
"Mark Twain
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He is most noted for his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885),[2] the latter often called "the Great American Novel."

Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. He apprenticed with a printer. He also worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion's newspaper. After toiling as a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River before heading west to join Orion. He was a failure at gold mining, so he next turned to journalism. While a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," which became very popular and brought nationwide attention. His travelogues were also well received. Twain had found his calling."


[link to en.wikipedia.org]
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/10/2012 03:26 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
I'm lucky I've been born here. Took me around 30 years to get to my current level of English and it would have been an impossible task for me to learn German as a foreign language. Our grammar is insane, just like French. Thankfully, as children we learn language by magic, and not through books.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25213002


thats right. or try learning polish. almost humanly impossible i've been told.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/10/2012 03:29 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Best. Thread. Ever.
But I must admit, I like the german language. And if you think it's hard to master... Try hungarian. Some say it is related to sumerian. Very complex and very well-sounding.

German-dialect-wise, I love the franconian dialect. It sounds a lot like english, and if you're deeply into it, no other german can understand a word u'r sayin :)
 Quoting: •••Weltschmerz•••


personally i like bavarian dialect better.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 25123144
Germany
10/10/2012 03:29 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
"I went often to look at the collection of curiosities in Heidelberg Castle, and one day I surprised the keeper of it with my German. I spoke entirely in that language. He was greatly interested; and after I had talked a while he said my German was very rare, possibly a "unique"; and wanted to add it to his museum.

If he had known what it had cost me to acquire my art, he would also have known that it would break any collector to buy it. Harris and I had been hard at work on our German during several weeks at that time, and although we had made good progress, it had been accomplished under great difficulty and annoyance, for three of our teachers had died in the mean time. A person who has not studied German can form no idea of what a perplexing language it is.

Surely there is not another language that is so slipshod and systemless, and so slippery and elusive to the grasp. One is washed about in it, hither and thither, in the most helpless way; and when at last he thinks he has captured a rule which offers firm ground to take a rest on amid the general rage and turmoil of the ten parts of speech, he turns over the page and reads, "Let the pupil make careful note of the following exceptions." He runs his eye down and finds that there are more exceptions to the rule than instances of it. So overboard he goes again, to hunt for another Ararat and find another quicksand. Such has been, and continues to be, my experience. Every time I think I have got one of these four confusing "cases" where I am master of it, a seemingly insignificant preposition intrudes itself into my sentence, clothed with an awful and unsuspected power, and crumbles the ground from under me. For instance, my book inquires after a certain bird -- (it is always inquiring after things which are of no sort of consequence to anybody): "Where is the bird?" Now the answer to this question -- according to the book -- is that the bird is waiting in the blacksmith shop on account of the rain. Of course no bird would do that, but then you must stick to the book. Very well, I begin to cipher out the German for that answer. I begin at the wrong end, necessarily, for that is the German idea. I say to myself, "Regen (rain) is masculine -- or maybe it is feminine -- or possibly neuter -- it is too much trouble to look now. Therefore, it is either der (the) Regen, or die (the) Regen, or das (the) Regen, according to which gender it may turn out to be when I look. In the interest of science, I will cipher it out on the hypothesis that it is masculine. Very well -- then the rain is der Regen, if it is simply in the quiescent state of being mentioned, without enlargement or discussion -- Nominative case; but if this rain is lying around, in a kind of a general way on the ground, it is then definitely located, it is doing something -- that is, resting (which is one of the German grammar's ideas of doing something), and this throws the rain into the Dative case, and makes it dem Regen. However, this rain is not resting, but is doing something actively, -- it is falling -- to interfere with the bird, likely -- and this indicates movement, which has the effect of sliding it into the Accusative case and changing dem Regen into den Regen." Having completed the grammatical horoscope of this matter, I answer up confidently and state in German that the bird is staying in the blacksmith shop "wegen (on account of) den Regen." Then the teacher lets me softly down with the remark that whenever the word "wegen" drops into a sentence, it always throws that subject into the Genitive case, regardless of consequences -- and that therefore this bird stayed in the blacksmith shop "wegen des Regens.""


[link to www.crossmyt.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25123144
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 24966437
South Africa
10/10/2012 08:12 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
German his given us some beautiful words:

Weltschmerz
Weltanschauung
Daseinsberechtigung
Feindberuhrung
Fingerspitzengefühl
Das Ding an Sich
Klangfarbe
Materialschlacht
Kampfbereit
Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgese​tz
Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän
Schadefreude
Frühlingserwachen
Hottentottenpotentatentantenattentat
Frontkameradschaft
Backpfeifengesicht
Sauerkraut
Ampelmännchen
Fahrvergnügen
Aha-Erlebnis
Vergangenheitsbewältigung
Vernichtungsgedanke
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1273864


Kindergarten
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437


Zeitgeist
 Quoting: •••Weltschmerz•••



Gotterdammerung - sorry, don't know how to do the umlaut on the keyboard.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437




fest

This one is very popular at the moment among people speaking English.

Well, it looks like the English language has forsaken the centuries-old habit of using French words to express themselves - in favour of good strong German words nowadays..
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 25302316
Germany
10/10/2012 08:26 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
German his given us some beautiful words:

Weltschmerz
Weltanschauung
Daseinsberechtigung
Feindberuhrung
Fingerspitzengefühl
Das Ding an Sich
Klangfarbe
Materialschlacht
Kampfbereit
Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgese​tz
Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän
Schadefreude
Frühlingserwachen
Hottentottenpotentatentantenattentat
Frontkameradschaft
Backpfeifengesicht
Sauerkraut
Ampelmännchen
Fahrvergnügen
Aha-Erlebnis
Vergangenheitsbewältigung
Vernichtungsgedanke
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1273864


Kindergarten
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437


Autobahn
Blitzkrieg
Bratwurst

"Deutsche Sprache, schwere Sprache."
"German Language, difficult Language."

ohyeah
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 25302316
Germany
10/10/2012 08:52 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
And by the way, isn't English also a Germanic language?!
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24966437


Yes, English and German Language have the same roots and many words are identical or broadly similar.

and - und
going - gehen
Home - Heim
...

[link to de.wiktionary.org]
Thor's Hamster

User ID: 1248699
United States
10/10/2012 08:54 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Damn you, Samuel Clemens....DAMN YOU!!!!
Apollo astronauts couldn't have passed through Van Allen's Belt. Van Allen wore suspenders.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 26007616
Germany
10/27/2012 03:05 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
bump
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 26007616
Germany
10/27/2012 03:07 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Autobahn
Blitzkrieg
Bratwurst

"Deutsche Sprache, schwere Sprache."
"German Language, difficult Language."

ohyeah
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25302316


yoda
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 26007616
Germany
10/27/2012 03:09 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: "The Awful German Language" by Mark Twain
Identical words
Adjektive · adjectives

abnormal
abrupt
abstinent
absurd
anal
analog
arrogant
banal
beige
bilateral
bitter
blind
blond
brutal
clean (Drogen)
clever
cool
diagonal
digital
elegant
emotional

Substantive · nouns

AIDS, Aids n.
April m.
August m.
Bavaria f.
CD f.
DJ m.
DNA f.
Dr.
DVD f.
EU f.
Germania f.
Halloween n.
Holocaust m.
Islam m.
NATO f.
Nazi m.
November m.
PC m.
Satan m.
September m.
SMS f.
UFO n.
UNO f.
WC n.

Länder, Regionen, Orte · countries, regions, places

Afghanistan
Alaska
Andorra
Angola
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belize
Benin
Bhutan
Brunei
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Chile
China
Costa Rica
Dominica
Ecuador
El Salvador
England
Eritrea
Ghana
Grenada
Guatemala
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Guyana
Haiti
Holland
Honduras
Iran m.
Israel
Japan
Jupiter m.
Kiribati
Korea
Kosovo m.
Kuwait
Laos
Lesotho
Liberia
Liechtenstein
Malaysia
Mali
Malta
Mars m.
Mauritius
Monaco
Montenegro
Namibia
Nepal
Nicaragua
Niger
Nigeria
Oman
Pakistan
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Pluto m.

Andere · others

alias
all
amen
apropos
ca.
circa
ergo
et al.
et cetera
etc.
etc. pp.
h.c. (honoris causa)
in (Präposition)
junior
minus
per (Präposition)
plus (Präposition)
pro (Präposition)
so
versus (Präposition)
vs. (Präposition)
via (Präposition)

Verben: Endung -(e)n im Deutschen

Unterschiede: Endung -(e)n bei deutschen Verben

abseil: abseilen
bind: binden
blink: blinken
bluff: bluffen
box: boxen
bring: bringen
charter: chartern
design: designen
dope: dopen
download: downloaden
end: enden
fall: fallen
fast: fasten
film: filmen
filter: filtern
find: finden
foul: foulen
hack: hacken
lade: laden (Fracht)
land: landen
lease: leasen
manage: managen
order: ordern
pack: packen
pass: passen
piss: pissen
press: pressen
pump: pumpen
recycle: recyclen
roll: rollen
send: senden
sing: singen
sink: sinken
spring: springen
sprint: sprinten
start: starten
stink: stinken
surf: surfen
test: testen
text: texten
tick: ticken
warn: warnen
wind: winden
wring: wringen
zoom: zoomen

Groß-/Kleinschreibung

Unterschiede: Groß-/Kleinschreibung

addition: Addition f.
adoption: Adoption f.
adverb: Adverb n.
agent: Agent m.
aggression: Aggression f.
alarm: Alarm m.
album: Album n.
alibi: Alibi n.
alligator: Alligator m.
alphabet: Alphabet n.
altar: Altar m.
alternative: Alternative f.
aluminium: Aluminium n.
amateur: Amateur m.
American football: American Football
amplitude: Amplitude f.
angst: Angst f.
anorak: Anorak m.
aquarium: Aquarium n.
arena: Arena f.
argon: Argon n.
argument: Argument n.
arm: Arm m.
aroma: Aroma n.
arsenal: Arsenal n.
asteroid: Asteroid m.
asthma: Asthma n.
astronaut: Astronaut m.
asymptote: Asymptote f.
atlas: Atlas m.
atom: Atom n.
aubergine: Aubergine f.
audio: Audio
aura: Aura f.
automation: Automation f.
automat: Automat m.
aversion: Aversion f.
baby: Baby n.
babysitter: Babysitter m.
badminton: Badminton n.
balance: Balance f.
ball: Ball m.
band: Band f.
bank: Bank f.
bar: Bar f.
barometer: Barometer n.
baseball: Baseball
basis: Basis f.
basketball: Basketball
bass: Bass m.
bastard: Bastard m.
berserker: Berserker n.
beryllium: Beryllium n.
bikini: Bikini m.
bison: Bison m.
bit: Bit n.
blitzkrieg: Blitzkrieg m.
blockade: Blockade f.
block: Block m.
bluffer: Bluffer m.
bluff: Bluff m.
bodybuilder: Bodybuilder m.
bodybuilding: Bodybuilding n.
bodyguard: Bodyguard m.
boom: Boom m.
boss: Boss m.
boutique: Boutique f.
boxer: Boxer m.
box: Box f.
bridge: Bridge n.
bringer: Bringer m.
broccoli: Broccoli m.
bronze: Bronze f.
browser: Browser m.
budget: Budget n.
bunker: Bunker m.
bus: Bus m.
butler: Butler m.
butter: Butter f.
byte: Byte n.
café: Café n.
calcium: Calcium n.
casino: Casino n.
cello: Cello n.
cent: Cent m.
chance: Chance f.
chaos: Chaos n.
charisma: Charisma n.
charts: Charts
cheeseburger: Cheeseburger m.
chip: Chip m.
chlorophyll: Chlorophyll n.
cholera: Cholera f.
clique: Clique f.
clown: Clown m.
club: Club m.
cobalt: Cobalt n.
cockpit: Cockpit n.
cocktail: Cocktail m.
code: Code m.
comeback: Comeback n.
compiler: Compiler m.
computer: Computer m.
container: Container m.
cornflakes: Cornflakes
couch: Couch f.
cowboy: Cowboy m.
crew: Crew f.
curry: Curry m., n.
dachshund: Dachshund m.
deck: Deck n.
definition: Definition f.
delegation: Delegation f.
delinquent: Delinquent m.
demonstration: Demonstration f.
demo: Demo f.
deodorant: Deodorant n.
depot: Depot n.
depression: Depression f.
despot: Despot m.
dessert: Dessert n.
detail: Detail n.
detonation: Detonation f.
dialog (amerikanisch): Dialog m.
dimension: Dimension f.
dimmer: Dimmer m.
dingo: Dingo m.
diplomat: Diplomat m.
disco: Disco f.
diva: Diva f.
division: Division f.
dock: Dock n.
dogma: Dogma n.
doping: Doping n.
doppelgänger: Doppelgänger m.
download: Download m., n.
drama: Drama n.
drink: Drink m.
echo: Echo n.
element: Element n.
elite: Elite f.
ellipse: Ellipse f.
e-mail: E-Mail f., n.
emotion: Emotion f.
episode: Episode f.
erosion: Erosion f.
euro: Euro m.
evolution: Evolution f.
expedition: Expedition f.
experiment: Experiment n.
explosion: Explosion f.
exponent: Exponent m.
fan: Fan m.
fanfare: Fanfare f.
farm: Farm f.
fast food: Fast Food n.
fax: Fax n.
film: Film m.
filter: Filter m.
finder: Finder m.
finger: Finger m.
fitness: Fitness f.
form: Form f.
format: Format n.
forum: Forum n.
fossil: Fossil n.
foul: Foul n.
fragment: Fragment n.
frisbee: Frisbee n.
frost: Frost m.
fusion: Fusion f.
gallium: Gallium n.
gangster: Gangster m.
garage: Garage f.
gas: Gas n.
gel: Gel n.
generation: Generation f.
generator: Generator m.
genre: Genre n.
germanium: Germanium n.
gesundheit (amerikanischer Höflichkeitsausdruck): Gesundheit
ghostwriter: Ghostwriter m.
giraffe: Giraffe f.
gladiator: Gladiator m.
gnu: Gnu n.
gold: Gold n.
golf: Golf n. (Sportart)
gorilla: Gorilla m.
grapefruit: Grapefruit f.
graph: Graph m.
hacker: Hacker m.
hamburger: Hamburger m.
hammer: Hammer m.
hamster: Hamster m.
hand: Hand f.
handball: Handball
handstand: Handstand m.
hardware: Hardware f.
helium: Helium n.
heroin: Heroin n.
highlight: Highlight n.
hippie: Hippie m.
hit: Hit m.
hobby: Hobby n.
hockey: Hockey n.
horde: Horde f.
horn: Horn n.
horror: Horror m.
hot dog: Hot Dog m., n.

[link to de.wiktionary.org]

News