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Message Subject Jordan Protests - Game Changer - Moslem Brotherhood TRYING TO SAVE Jordan's King?
Poster Handle Anonymous Coward
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The blue-eyed king and beautiful queen of Jordan are facing the biggest crisis of their reign. On Tuesday night, riots and protests broke out in many of the country’s cities. Some in the crowd shouted “the people want the fall of the regime.” Others burned the monarch’s portrait. One longtime supporter of the royals even suggested privately “it’s not a question of if, but when” King Abdullah’s rule will end. That may well be an overstatement. The protests only included a few thousand people all told. But the pressures for truly major political reforms are mounting. ...

In the past, protests often focused on Queen Rania, a brilliant and beautiful woman commonly seen as a power behind the throne. ... King Abdullah, having failed to defend his prime ministers and turned on successive spymasters, did little to protect his wife’s reputation. But as she adopted a much lower profile, Abdullah’s prestige did not rise. Instead, discontent focused on the king. Now the monarch himself is increasingly alone before the people, and reliant more than ever before on foreign support.

The money Jordan’s government once received from the Gulf monarchies has grown increasingly scarce... So American support for the Hashemite monarch is more important than ever. Abdullah has promised political reforms, not least, to shore up support in Washington...

In Jordan, as in Egypt and many other Arab countries, the Muslim Brotherhood is a strong political force, and its members may be encouraging the current unrest. But the bedrock problem is economic. The financial demands on Jordan just keep growing. To maintain a vital agreement for support from the International Monetary Fund, Jordan must pare back its hugely expensive government subsidies for basic goods. But those make the difference for many Jordanians between hovering above the poverty line and sinking below it.

[link to www.thedailybeast.com]
 
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