Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 2,334 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 1,731,932
Pageviews Today: 2,403,575Threads Today: 602Posts Today: 12,050
07:44 PM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 25783006
United States
11/25/2012 05:01 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story

I try not to be biased, but I had my doubts about hiring Stevie. His placement counselor assured me that he would be a good, reliable busboy. But I had never had a mentally handicapped employee and wasn't sure I wanted one. I wasn't sure how my customers would react to Stevie. He was short, a little dumpy with the smooth facial features and thick-tongued sp
eech of Downs Syndrome.

I wasn't worried about most of my trucker customers because truckers don't generally care who buses tables as long as the meatloaf platter is good and the pies are homemade. The four-wheeler drivers were the ones who concerned me; the mouthy college kids traveling to school; the yuppie snobs who secretly polish their silverware with their napkins for fear of catching some dreaded "truck stop germ" the pairs of white-shirted business men on expense accounts who think every truck stop waitress wants to be flirted with. I knew those people would be uncomfortable around Stevie so I closely watched him for the first few weeks.

I shouldn't have worried. After the first week, Stevie had my staff wrapped around his stubby little finger, and within a month my truck regulars had adopted him as their official truck stop mascot. After that, I really didn't care what the rest of the customers thought of him. He was like a 21-year-old in blue jeans and Nikes, eager to laugh and eager to please, but fierce in his attention to his duties. Every salt and pepper shaker was exactly in its place, not a bread crumb or coffee spill was visible when Stevie got done with the table.

Our only problem was persuading him to wait to clean a table until after the customers were finished. He would hover in the background, shifting his weight from one foot to the other, scanning the dining room until a table was empty. Then he would scurry to the empty table and carefully bus dishes and glasses onto cart and meticulously wipe the table up with a practiced flourish of his rag. If he thought a customer was watching, his brow would pucker with added concentration. He took pride in doing his job exactly right, and you had to love how hard he tried to please each and every person he met.

Over time, we learned that he lived with his mother, a widow who was disabled after repeated surgeries for cancer. They lived on their Social Security benefits in public housing two miles from the truck stop. Their social worker, who stopped to check on him every so often, admitted they had fallen between the cracks. Money was tight, and what I paid him was probably the difference between them being able to live together and Stevie being sent to a group home. That's why the restaurant was a gloomy place that morning last August, the first morning in three years that Stevie missed work.

He was at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester getting a new valve or something put in his heart. His social worker said that people with Downs Syndrome often have heart problems at an early age so this wasn't unexpected, and there was a good chance he would come through the surgery in good shape and be back at work in a few months.

A ripple of excitement ran through the staff later that morning when word came that he was out of surgery, in recovery, and doing fine. Frannie, the head waitress, let out a war hoop and did a little dance in the aisle when she heard the good news. Bell Ringer, one of our regular trucker customers, stared at the sight of this 50-year-old grandmother of four doing a victory shimmy beside his table. Frannie blushed, smoothed her apron and shot Belle Ringer a withering look.

He grinned. "OK, Frannie, what was that all about?" he asked.

"We just got word that Stevie is out of surgery and going to be okay."

"I was wondering where he was. I had a new joke to tell him. What was the surgery about?"

Frannie quickly told Bell Ringer and the other two drivers sitting at his booth about Stevie's surgery, then sighed: "Yeah, I'm glad he is going to be OK," she said. "But I don't know how he and his Mom are going to handle all the bills. From what I hear, they're barely getting by as it is." Belle Ringer nodded thoughtfully, and Frannie hurried off to wait on the rest of her tables.

Since I hadn't had time to round up a busboy to replace Stevie and really didn't want to replace him, the girls were busing their own tables that day until we decided what to do. After the morning rush, Frannie walked into my office. She had a couple of paper napkins in her hand and a funny look on her face.

"What's up?" I asked.

"I didn't get that table where Bell Ringer and his friends were sitting cleared off after they left, and Pony Pete and Tony Tipper were sitting there when I got back to clean it off," she said. "This was folded and tucked under a coffee cup."

She handed the napkin to me, and three $20 bills fell onto my desk when I opened it. On the outside, in big, bold letters, was printed "Something For Stevie.

Pony Pete asked me what that was all about," she said, "so I told him about Stevie and his Mom and everything, and Pete looked at Tony and Tony looked at Pete, and they ended up giving me this." She handed me another paper napkin that had "Something For Stevie" scrawled on its outside. Two $50 bills were tucked within its folds.

Frannie looked at me with wet, shiny eyes, shook her head and said simply: "truckers."

That was three months ago. Today is Thanksgiving, the first day Stevie is supposed to be back to work. His placement worker said he's been counting the days until the doctor said he could work, and it didn't matter at all that it was a holiday. He called 10 times in the past week, making sure we knew he was coming, fearful that we had forgotten him or that his job was in jeopardy.

I arranged to have his mother bring him to work. I then met them in the parking lot and invited them both to celebrate his day back. Stevie was thinner and paler, but couldn't stop grinning as he pushed through the doors and headed for the back room where his apron and busing cart were waiting.

"Hold up there, Stevie, not so fast," I said. I took him and his mother by their arms. "Work can wait for a minute. To celebrate you coming back, breakfast for you and your mother is on me!"

I led them toward a large corner booth at the rear of the room. I could feel and hear the rest of the staff following behind as we marched through the dining room. Glancing over my shoulder, I saw booth after booth of grinning truckers empty and join the procession. We stopped in front of the big table. Its surface was covered with coffee cups, saucers and dinner plates, all sitting slightly crooked on dozens of folded paper napkins.

"First thing you have to do, Stevie, is clean up this mess," I said. I tried to sound stern. Stevie looked at me, and then at his mother, then pulled out one of the napkins. It had "Something for Stevie" printed on the outside. As he picked it up, two $10 bills fell onto the table.

Stevie stared at the money, then at all the napkins peeking from beneath the tableware, each with his name printed or scrawled on it. I turned to his mother.

"There's more than $10,000 in cash and checks on table, all from truckers and trucking companies that heard about your problems. "Happy Thanksgiving,"

Well, it got real noisy about that time, with everybody hollering and shouting, and there were a few tears, as well. But you know what's funny? While everybody else was busy shaking hands and hugging each other, Stevie, with a big, big smile on his face, was busy clearing all the cups and dishes from the table. Best worker I ever hired.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 28222898
United States
11/25/2012 05:12 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Wonderful story best post of the day!!sweet_kiss
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1128116
Canada
11/25/2012 05:12 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
lmao awesome
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1381928
United States
11/25/2012 05:14 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Brings a tear to this old man's eye...

imagine this country if the politicians and leaders could come together like this
Ralph--a house dog

User ID: 25802009
United States
11/25/2012 05:27 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Very heartwarming! And it is always good to hear of those who have the ability to look beyond the disability of another and see the real person inside.
"Who decides?"
---Robert A. Heinlein

[link to www.westcoasttruth.com]

"Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night.....Rage, rage against the dying of the light"
----Dylan Thomas
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 9788321
United States
11/25/2012 05:30 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
It's very telling that human beings can't help but love someone who has no preconceived notions about life, religion, or society.

If only we could all be more like Stevie and forget everything we THINK we know about life... humanity would come back into balance.
Abi ~

User ID: 25045778
United States
11/25/2012 05:30 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
bump

ty for a wonderful story!!! good to know there are still wonderful, caring souls in the world..
You accept the love you think you deserve~~~

Love cannot live where there is no trust~~~

Truth has no temperature~~~
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 28457482
United States
11/25/2012 05:35 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Awwwww.

hf
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 28117669
United States
11/25/2012 05:37 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
It's very telling that human beings can't help but love someone who has no preconceived notions about life, religion, or society.

If only we could all be more like Stevie and forget everything we THINK we know about life... humanity would come back into balance.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 9788321


So if we all started sacrificing ourselves for someone else, because we're sacrificed for someone else, then everything will be balanced?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 3646007
United States
11/25/2012 05:45 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
red_heart
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 28434736
Japan
11/25/2012 09:43 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
I cried.
black calx
hee ho ho ho!

User ID: 1516834
United States
11/25/2012 09:47 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Nice! It's good to hear news about caring people for a change.

hf
[link to www.youtube.com (secure)]

Watch "The Money Masters" and read "The Creature From Jekyll Island" by G. Edward Griffin to unveil the true enemy.

Buddha say - don't bend over backwards.

"At times reality just can't be trusted." - Clyde Lewis
beeches

User ID: 28167778
United States
11/25/2012 09:49 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Let me tell you this story rings so true.

the best is imagining him waiting impatienty for the customers to be finished eating - I can so identify -

thanks for posting this!!!!!!
Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good life.
black calx
hee ho ho ho!

User ID: 1516834
United States
11/25/2012 09:49 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
It's very telling that human beings can't help but love someone who has no preconceived notions about life, religion, or society.

If only we could all be more like Stevie and forget everything we THINK we know about life... humanity would come back into balance.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 9788321


So if we all started sacrificing ourselves for someone else, because we're sacrificed for someone else, then everything will be balanced?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 28117669


I think the point is we should be living a life of service to others, not service to self. Then the population wouldn't be in such a state of greed.
[link to www.youtube.com (secure)]

Watch "The Money Masters" and read "The Creature From Jekyll Island" by G. Edward Griffin to unveil the true enemy.

Buddha say - don't bend over backwards.

"At times reality just can't be trusted." - Clyde Lewis
beeches

User ID: 28167778
United States
11/25/2012 09:51 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
The point for me is that Stevie found a job he loved, and that people missed him when he was gone.

that is heaven on earth for anyone who works with kids with disablilities.


WOW!!!!
Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good life.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 27691647
United States
11/25/2012 09:58 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
I thought for sure there was going to be some DOOM message on that napkin...
sTTsTTT

User ID: 20711409
United States
11/25/2012 09:59 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
I sincerely wish you had posted as a "regular" rather than anonymous. Would love to give you green Karma for this unexpected & uplifting story!

Thank you.
Apocalypse: All shall be revealed. And all shall be revealed.
*******
All Human Beings are Human. Not all Humans are Human Beings.
*******
TDJ

User ID: 26423286
United States
11/25/2012 10:00 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
I got this in an email a long time ago. Once my eyes stopped watering I sent it to everyone I had on my list. Most replied with a "thanks" don't usually hear back about email.

dog h2o fight
If something can corrupt you, you're corrupted already.

Bob Marley

“The duty of a patriot is to protect his country from its government.”
THOMAS PAINE (1737-1809)

Do not pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one. Bruce Lee
CORNHAULER (cornholer)
User ID: 27720836
United States
11/25/2012 10:00 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
If stevie
The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story

I try not to be biased, but I had my doubts about hiring Stevie. His placement counselor assured me that he would be a good, reliable busboy. But I had never had a mentally handicapped employee and wasn't sure I wanted one. I wasn't sure how my customers would react to Stevie. He was short, a little dumpy with the smooth facial features and thick-tongued sp
eech of Downs Syndrome.

I wasn't worried about most of my trucker customers because truckers don't generally care who buses tables as long as the meatloaf platter is good and the pies are homemade. The four-wheeler drivers were the ones who concerned me; the mouthy college kids traveling to school; the yuppie snobs who secretly polish their silverware with their napkins for fear of catching some dreaded "truck stop germ" the pairs of white-shirted business men on expense accounts who think every truck stop waitress wants to be flirted with. I knew those people would be uncomfortable around Stevie so I closely watched him for the first few weeks.

I shouldn't have worried. After the first week, Stevie had my staff wrapped around his stubby little finger, and within a month my truck regulars had adopted him as their official truck stop mascot. After that, I really didn't care what the rest of the customers thought of him. He was like a 21-year-old in blue jeans and Nikes, eager to laugh and eager to please, but fierce in his attention to his duties. Every salt and pepper shaker was exactly in its place, not a bread crumb or coffee spill was visible when Stevie got done with the table.

Our only problem was persuading him to wait to clean a table until after the customers were finished. He would hover in the background, shifting his weight from one foot to the other, scanning the dining room until a table was empty. Then he would scurry to the empty table and carefully bus dishes and glasses onto cart and meticulously wipe the table up with a practiced flourish of his rag. If he thought a customer was watching, his brow would pucker with added concentration. He took pride in doing his job exactly right, and you had to love how hard he tried to please each and every person he met.

Over time, we learned that he lived with his mother, a widow who was disabled after repeated surgeries for cancer. They lived on their Social Security benefits in public housing two miles from the truck stop. Their social worker, who stopped to check on him every so often, admitted they had fallen between the cracks. Money was tight, and what I paid him was probably the difference between them being able to live together and Stevie being sent to a group home. That's why the restaurant was a gloomy place that morning last August, the first morning in three years that Stevie missed work.

He was at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester getting a new valve or something put in his heart. His social worker said that people with Downs Syndrome often have heart problems at an early age so this wasn't unexpected, and there was a good chance he would come through the surgery in good shape and be back at work in a few months.

A ripple of excitement ran through the staff later that morning when word came that he was out of surgery, in recovery, and doing fine. Frannie, the head waitress, let out a war hoop and did a little dance in the aisle when she heard the good news. Bell Ringer, one of our regular trucker customers, stared at the sight of this 50-year-old grandmother of four doing a victory shimmy beside his table. Frannie blushed, smoothed her apron and shot Belle Ringer a withering look.

He grinned. "OK, Frannie, what was that all about?" he asked.

"We just got word that Stevie is out of surgery and going to be okay."

"I was wondering where he was. I had a new joke to tell him. What was the surgery about?"

Frannie quickly told Bell Ringer and the other two drivers sitting at his booth about Stevie's surgery, then sighed: "Yeah, I'm glad he is going to be OK," she said. "But I don't know how he and his Mom are going to handle all the bills. From what I hear, they're barely getting by as it is." Belle Ringer nodded thoughtfully, and Frannie hurried off to wait on the rest of her tables.

Since I hadn't had time to round up a busboy to replace Stevie and really didn't want to replace him, the girls were busing their own tables that day until we decided what to do. After the morning rush, Frannie walked into my office. She had a couple of paper napkins in her hand and a funny look on her face.

"What's up?" I asked.

"I didn't get that table where Bell Ringer and his friends were sitting cleared off after they left, and Pony Pete and Tony Tipper were sitting there when I got back to clean it off," she said. "This was folded and tucked under a coffee cup."

She handed the napkin to me, and three $20 bills fell onto my desk when I opened it. On the outside, in big, bold letters, was printed "Something For Stevie.

Pony Pete asked me what that was all about," she said, "so I told him about Stevie and his Mom and everything, and Pete looked at Tony and Tony looked at Pete, and they ended up giving me this." She handed me another paper napkin that had "Something For Stevie" scrawled on its outside. Two $50 bills were tucked within its folds.

Frannie looked at me with wet, shiny eyes, shook her head and said simply: "truckers."

That was three months ago. Today is Thanksgiving, the first day Stevie is supposed to be back to work. His placement worker said he's been counting the days until the doctor said he could work, and it didn't matter at all that it was a holiday. He called 10 times in the past week, making sure we knew he was coming, fearful that we had forgotten him or that his job was in jeopardy.

I arranged to have his mother bring him to work. I then met them in the parking lot and invited them both to celebrate his day back. Stevie was thinner and paler, but couldn't stop grinning as he pushed through the doors and headed for the back room where his apron and busing cart were waiting.

"Hold up there, Stevie, not so fast," I said. I took him and his mother by their arms. "Work can wait for a minute. To celebrate you coming back, breakfast for you and your mother is on me!"

I led them toward a large corner booth at the rear of the room. I could feel and hear the rest of the staff following behind as we marched through the dining room. Glancing over my shoulder, I saw booth after booth of grinning truckers empty and join the procession. We stopped in front of the big table. Its surface was covered with coffee cups, saucers and dinner plates, all sitting slightly crooked on dozens of folded paper napkins.

"First thing you have to do, Stevie, is clean up this mess," I said. I tried to sound stern. Stevie looked at me, and then at his mother, then pulled out one of the napkins. It had "Something for Stevie" printed on the outside. As he picked it up, two $10 bills fell onto the table.

Stevie stared at the money, then at all the napkins peeking from beneath the tableware, each with his name printed or scrawled on it. I turned to his mother.

"There's more than $10,000 in cash and checks on table, all from truckers and trucking companies that heard about your problems. "Happy Thanksgiving,"

Well, it got real noisy about that time, with everybody hollering and shouting, and there were a few tears, as well. But you know what's funny? While everybody else was busy shaking hands and hugging each other, Stevie, with a big, big smile on his face, was busy clearing all the cups and dishes from the table. Best worker I ever hired.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25783006
If stevie was black he whould be trashed,by the truckers.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 27628598
Canada
11/25/2012 10:00 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Brings a tear to this old man's eye...

imagine this country if the politicians and leaders could come together like this
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1381928


forget politicians race and religion that shit only serves to divide us. It's stories like Stevie and folded napkins that unite us.

do you hear me Trin?

FIVE stars OP
better to give than get
User ID: 28484670
United States
11/25/2012 10:02 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Even though society is so fricken screwed up, people have good hearts in general. Giving is good for the heart!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 28476673
United States
11/25/2012 10:10 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Not to pee on your parade but this is email fantasy. I like the part where they make the truckers the good guys and everyone else assholes. I'm an actual trucker and in my experience the percentage of asshole in the trucker population is high.
StormeyGoddess

User ID: 22004193
United States
11/25/2012 10:10 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Great story, made me cry! :-) By far the best post EVER!
"Don't look back, you're not going that way."

"As for me and my family, we will serve the Lord.”
Hawk-02
Hawk-o-Holic

User ID: 897951
United States
11/25/2012 10:10 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Thankd for making me cry OP...
WAR INSIDE MY HEAD.
Hawk-02
Hawk-o-Holic

User ID: 897951
United States
11/25/2012 10:11 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Not to pee on your parade but this is email fantasy. I like the part where they make the truckers the good guys and everyone else assholes. I'm an actual trucker and in my experience the percentage of asshole in the trucker population is high.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 28476673


and thanks for making me laugh lmao
WAR INSIDE MY HEAD.
AKObserver

User ID: 28430921
United States
11/25/2012 10:13 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Wonderful Story! Reminds me of Bill Porter 'Door to door' the Watkin's company NJ salesman with CP. Great movie too.
If only we spent as much time and effort being kind as others spend being ugly think of the possibilities!
Thank You for posting.hugs

Last Edited by AKObserver on 11/25/2012 10:14 PM
dieoff

User ID: 6145585
United States
11/25/2012 10:16 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Something for Stevie

Claim: Stevie, a young man with Down syndrome, receives generous donation from truckers who frequent the restaurant where he works.

Status: False.

Is Stevie real, and is his story as related here true?

Unfortunately, no — "Something for Stevie" is a work of fiction by author Dan Anderson, published in rpm Magazine for Truckers in November 1998 and reprised in the 2000 book Stories for a Faithful Heart.
dieoff

User ID: 6145585
United States
11/25/2012 10:17 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
bsflag
closing eyes

User ID: 24721119
United States
11/25/2012 10:18 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Nice story!
If you woke up breathing, you have another chance!
beachmama

User ID: 27445655
United States
11/25/2012 10:20 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Beautiful story Op. There are spiritual lessons in this tale that we can all learn from. Compassion, understanding, giving unconditionally, and loving unconditionally.
StormeyGoddess

User ID: 22004193
United States
11/25/2012 10:26 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The Folded Napkin ... A Truckers Story
Something for Stevie

Claim: Stevie, a young man with Down syndrome, receives generous donation from truckers who frequent the restaurant where he works.

Status: False.

Is Stevie real, and is his story as related here true?

Unfortunately, no — "Something for Stevie" is a work of fiction by author Dan Anderson, published in rpm Magazine for Truckers in November 1998 and reprised in the 2000 book Stories for a Faithful Heart.
 Quoting: dieoff


Still a tear jerker! :-) Hope we all learn a lesson from it, anyway.

Be kind to others.
"Don't look back, you're not going that way."

"As for me and my family, we will serve the Lord.”
Related Threads

News