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I live my entire life in a constant state of depression

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 14553694
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11/28/2012 04:49 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
GET CHECKED For LYME FIRST!
Psychiatric Lyme has been linked with virtually every psychiatric diagnosis and can affect people of all ages and from every walk of life. A former honor roll student is diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder and pegged as a “problem kid” because he can’t sit still in class. A lawyer has to close her practice because she can’t concentrate and suffers from anxiety attacks. A young mother is so sensitive to noise that she can no longer tolerate her baby’s cry and is afraid that she will harm her child. A retired salesman develops a compulsive habit of writing all over everything—he covers everything from the tablecloth to matchbooks with meaningless scribbles.

Family members are baffled by these transformations; counselors and physicians are consulted, often to no avail. While these individuals may also have migrating muscles pain, headaches and problems with their joints—common signs of Lyme—these symptoms are rarely picked up in a mental health evaluation. And when traditional psychiatric medication fails to produce a cure, the patient grows more desperate.
Anonymous Coward
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11/28/2012 04:51 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
The Magick of Life

[link to www.youtube.com]
SlimExponent

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11/28/2012 05:18 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
I like to embrace the black dog of depression. I like the not caring about anything because there is no worth in anything. I like the numb feeling- comfortably numb.

Its a break from my normal state of anxiety. You can never be too paranoid is my minds motto.

Plus, when the black dog finally shakes you off, there is is that brief period of mania high.
Anonymous Coward
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11/28/2012 09:52 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
i know this will sound cliche, but try to find pleasure in the little/simple things in life (nature, music, friends, family, pets, art etc.) make an effort to spend time with positive people whom you actually like, especially important when you are feeling introverted and down.

i get down sometimes as well & I question my whole existence on a daily basis...its tough, but genrally i feel happy. but there are people in my life that when i spend time with them bring out a happy content side in me & i always come away feeling good after spending time with them.

hug your friends & family & tell them you love them (hopefully this is true?) its hard to do for some people. but it makes for powerfully connections.

good luck, from someone in the same boat

:)
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 28462079


goodnews
Anonymous Coward
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11/28/2012 09:52 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
Depression is caused by negative self talk. If you are blaming yourself for everything and regret everything, it is no wonder you are depressed!

I'm 39 and had been severely clinically depressed since I was a teenager. This changed for me a few years ago when I stopped the negative self talk. It took a while to get use to talking positively to myself, and a lot of practice, but it really does work!

You must learn how to forgive YOURSELF and then forgive others who have caused you harm or injustice. I read about a technique that I use that helps a lot. Anytime you have a negative thought, don't react emotionally to it. Don't relive the pain. Release it. Let it go. Just observe the thought and sent it on its way. Imagine the negative thought or idea on a puffy cloud and send it on up in the sky out of sight/out of mind. Or sometimes I image the idea in a heart shaped helium balloon and let it go.

Replace the negative thoughts with positive. This takes practice and don't be too hard on yourself while you are practicing. That's why it's called practice - you won't master it at first. :) Replace the I hate yous with I am a good person. Learn to tell yourself that you love you. Replace your regrets with the acknowledgement that you learned a lesson and you are thankful for the experience because you are sure you won't repeat it again.

Stop the blaming and STOP LIVING IN THE PAST. Be kind to yourself, smile at yourself in the mirror, and move forward.

I know you can do it because I believe in you.

B6 deficiency is linked to depression. Go buy a bottle and you'll be feeling a bit better in a week.

Also, depressed people should not be reading GLP. ;)

I think you are a good person and am sending you love.

hf
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1585861


clappa Great advice. You are worth it OP!
 Quoting: TheSeventhGate




This is a great post to the OP ... people do care! :) :hf:
 Quoting: IrishCol


goodnews
Anonymous Coward
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11/28/2012 09:55 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
I have a lot to be happy for, but I still cannot be happy. I pretend I'm happy, but I'm never really am. I blame myself for all things, and regret everything. No matter how much I tell myself tomorrow is going to be better, it never is.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 27302733


Well! I think you are looking at things the wrong way.
Have you ever wondered why there are so many depressed people. And only a hand full of people that for some reason seem to have their ducks in a row, well this is not true.
We are all the same and the condition you have is just the way you are.

Here is a thing you should try and use. When you think to yourself Wow im depressed (Pick a safe word) A word that you can use to change you mind and lead you away from thinking your something your not. (Even if A Doctor Says you Are) And Don't take Meds.

A safe word is a positive word, And Dont tell anyone your word Keep this safe.

If Any of this has helped let me know.

I have been usesing this for 20+ years and it works. Works for everything.

goodnews
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 12774950

That works for me too. My word is 'magic'. When I think of that word I think of magic moments when I was a kid, and that one day everything'll change, and the real magic will take over the world. And it will.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 28639414


goodnews

Great stuff here in this thread.. Great stuff.
Anonymous Coward
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11/28/2012 09:57 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
I have a lot to be happy for, but I still cannot be happy. I pretend I'm happy, but I'm never really am. I blame myself for all things, and regret everything. No matter how much I tell myself tomorrow is going to be better, it never is.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 27302733


a few things you can do that might help:

start observing your thought life. for every negative thought, recognize it and force yourself to turn it into a positive one. difficult, i know, but it can be done. your "self talk" is a vital piece to your mental environment.

for example, in your post you say that tomorrow is never better. FALSE. the bulk of depressive problems stems from negative thinking habits.

tomorrow IS going to be better. for one thing, you have survived everything in your life up to this point. good job. life aint easy and it's not for sissies.

be as social as you can. no more isolation. even if you don't feel like it or if it is awkward for you. do it anyway.

laugh more. make it happen. belly laughter is the best.

realize the areas for which you have control and the areas for which you are powerless. be okay with both.

exercise and do nice things to pamper yourself.

cure and help is not going to run toward you. you have to chase it down. i know, its hard to come up with inner strength in the midst of depression. do it anyway.

just do it. if you want to feel better, this is the only way. get up on your feet and make the changes that will help you.
 Quoting: Salt



another thing you can do is to not place too much importance on what you are feeling. place more importance on what you know and less on what you feel.

don't let your feelings govern everything you do.
feelings to not represent reality.

in spite of whatever you are feeling, the world is still turning and EVERYTHING is okay.
 Quoting: Salt


And remember, You are who you are.. Use this.

goodnews
Anonymous Coward
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11/28/2012 10:05 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
Take antipressants, don't listen to the naysayers. It turned my whole world around for the better. And I'm not "zombified" or anything like that: I'm simply comfortable in the world instead of in constant pain like I was before.
Anonymous Coward
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11/28/2012 10:06 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
For
I have a lot to be happy for, but I still cannot be happy. I pretend I'm happy, but I'm never really am. I blame myself for all things, and regret everything. No matter how much I tell myself tomorrow is going to be better, it never is.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 27302733


You are dehydrated perhaps.

Drink lots more water.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 27245451


For real. It helps me a lot. A half teaspoon of celtic sea salt in two quarts of water makes it even better.

Then, attend to your gut. Neurotransmitters are formed in your gut. Bone stock and probiotics will help. So will cleaning up your diet.

Start there. I'm depressed too. It gets better each year but I'm not happy yet. Quitting coffee and alcohol helped. And I've got to let go cigs and sugar too. Keep swallowing vitamins.

But that water and chicken soup advice...its good.
Anonymous Coward
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11/28/2012 10:10 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
I have a lot to be happy for, but I still cannot be happy. I pretend I'm happy, but I'm never really am. I blame myself for all things, and regret everything. No matter how much I tell myself tomorrow is going to be better, it never is.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 27302733


You are dehydrated perhaps.

Drink lots more water.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 27245451


Thanks. I drink fluids non-stop. I definitely drink the suggested 8 glasses per day.

When I was about 16.5 years old, I was sitting on one of my friend's front porch. Something hit me like a train, like my entire life flashed before my eyes, but It took a long time, so not necessarily a 'flash' but for about 15 minutes or so, I went into this deep sinking sad and self-loathing world where I decided I didn't like who I was.

I have never recovered from that.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 27302733


Maybe you'll get over that in time. I'm a big disappointment to myself also but I still manage to be happy and to find hope for tomorrow. A lot of being happy is adjusting to who you really are (from heredity or whatever) and lowering your expectations. Expect less and then you won't be so disappointed.
Anonymous Coward
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New Zealand
11/28/2012 10:15 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
Im the same
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 28378701

Let's face it this is a fucking depressing planet to live on.
Perhaps we're sane?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 27531391
United States
11/28/2012 10:27 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
Im the same
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 28378701

Let's face it this is a fucking depressing planet to live on.
Perhaps we're sane?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 4473716


rockon
CrossBone

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11/28/2012 10:34 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
I'm in my 40s now and I've lived with diagnosed, clinical depression all my life. In my 20s I was self-medicating myself liberally with alcohol, anxiolytes (mainly benzodiazepines) and occasional weed smoking. My depression and alcoholism got progressively worse and eventually my condition deteriorated into psychotic depression. I was hospitalized for some time.

My experiences from both depression and alcoholism is that they are a lot alike: there is no cure and the dark abyss of sickness is always there waiting for you to fall in.

You'll never be happy-go-lucky type of a personality, but that's OK. You are what you are. You may be dark, brooding and pessimistic, but that's your outlook on life and the society has no right to expect you to cheer up and take the "normal" maddeningly cheerful and disgustingly positive view on life. You should completely disregard the ignorant people who say that "oh, everybody gets the blues now and then" and then tell you to cheer up. They don't know shit about what real depression is like. The monster we have to live with has its fangs and nails embedded so deep in our brain tissue that telling us to cheer up is just as ridiculous as telling a cancer patient to cure himself. At the best depression compares to chronic physical pain, at the worst it is a debilitating and lethal condition.

However, when your life gets disrupted/disabled because of the depression, there are things you can and should do to make the life more bearable. You can't exorcise the monster completely, but you can learn to live with it.

It all starts from this question: do you want to be alive?

When I hit the bottom I had a revelation: I can keep on drinking, popping benzos the doctors kindly keep prescribing to me and wallowing in my despair, but it will kill me before I'm 40. I seriously considered that option as, to be honest, I didn't want to live that much. However, I didn't want to die either, because that would mean that the life and the universe had won by managing to crush me. So, in therapy I decided that I'll live - just to give the finger to life, the universe and the sadistic god who allegedly gave me this life devoid of any meaning. Go ahead, do you worst. I'll bend, but I will not break and give you the satisfaction.

That was my motivation, you've got to find yours.

The next step is to find something to do with all the empty hours. Initially, I spent quite a lot of time in therapy trying to find alternatives to drinking. Eventually I found another drug to replace the alcohol, sedatives and weed.

For me it was regimented exercise: bicycling, boxing and weight workouts. I enjoy reading, making plans and charting my progress in detail, so I read a lot of human physiology, anatomy, nutritional science and theory of sports, and turned my exercises into science.

Even if you don't drink or do recreational drugs, I think finding such a hobby or hobbies should help you cope with depression. I'm not saying that you should start exercising religiously, but try experimenting with different activities and see if you like any of them. If you don't like it, stop doing it and find something else. Experiment! Don't just think of a hobby and how (un)interesting it sounds. With a depression-prone personality, you'll just end up discarding all ideas before you even try them.

Heck, become a prepper and start making plans for the doomsday. I didn't believe in Y2K, but I did do prepping, because reading on survival techniques, creating a bug-out kit and planning for all kids of contingencies was simply fun!

If your depression is so bad that you can't think straight, get help. For me, the warning signs were unpaid bills (didn't care anymore), loss of all social life and spending all day in bed drunk/asleep. I know I'm going to get bashed for this, but my experience is that SSRI drugs (prozac-type medication) do help. They dull the sharpest mental pain and thus help you to gain back control over your life. You SHOULD NOT, however, settle just for the pills and keep popping them for the rest of your life. That's an easy solution for the doctors and they like to prescribe SSRI pills liberally just to get rid of you. The medication should ALWAYS be accompanied by therapy or at least peer support (someone who's been through the same experience) or maybe a family member or a friend who can truly relate to you. I don't recommend the last one, since helping someone deal with moderate/severe depression is extremely draining, especially if you're not suffering from the same condition.

I did SSRI drugs and Naltrexone (for controlling my alcoholism) for two years, but I haven't been taking them ever since. These pills did help by dulling the sharpest pain of depression and curbing my craving for alcohol, but cognitive therapy was the most effective ingredient in my recovery. Cognitive therapy is about helping you to spot harmful and disproportional thought patterns and how to correct them. It's rather fast and practical, and does not involve any of the stereotypical Freudian psychoanalysis of your earliest childhood memories, sexual dysfunction or mother-father grudges.

One more thing. You say that you try to tell yourself that tomorrow is going to be better. Don't waste your time on thinking about tomorrow - or the past, for that matter. This moment is what matters. Dwelling on the past or the future will just depress you more.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 21734520


Thank you for this!
IrishCol

User ID: 28224126
United Kingdom
11/28/2012 11:48 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
Its comforting to see people really do care and sad too that so many feel the same...


I have worked for many years with people who suffered ill mental health, from depression through to schizophrnia and more and honestly can say there is alot of great advice and some good points being raised, and I hope the OP and others can take some positives from this! hf
 Quoting: IrishCol


I bet not one was checked for Lyme Disease. The public doesn't understand that this is a worldwide problem and these are one of the symptoms along with 100 others. Anger is to top one..Once treated for a year ALL THE SYMPTOMS will be GONE.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14553694


Lyme disease is a bacterial infection not a mental health illness and some common symptoms being muscle and joint paint, numbess and tingling, speech problems and abnormal muscle movement, chills, fever, general ill feeling to name a few.
 Quoting: IrishCol


WrONG..It is a MENTAL illness and affects your brain. My son has it and he went mental
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14553694



I think you better research that again .. there's a big difference!!!!
IrishCol

User ID: 28224126
United Kingdom
11/28/2012 11:51 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
I'm in my 40s now and I've lived with diagnosed, clinical depression all my life. In my 20s I was self-medicating myself liberally with alcohol, anxiolytes (mainly benzodiazepines) and occasional weed smoking. My depression and alcoholism got progressively worse and eventually my condition deteriorated into psychotic depression. I was hospitalized for some time.

My experiences from both depression and alcoholism is that they are a lot alike: there is no cure and the dark abyss of sickness is always there waiting for you to fall in.

You'll never be happy-go-lucky type of a personality, but that's OK. You are what you are. You may be dark, brooding and pessimistic, but that's your outlook on life and the society has no right to expect you to cheer up and take the "normal" maddeningly cheerful and disgustingly positive view on life. You should completely disregard the ignorant people who say that "oh, everybody gets the blues now and then" and then tell you to cheer up. They don't know shit about what real depression is like. The monster we have to live with has its fangs and nails embedded so deep in our brain tissue that telling us to cheer up is just as ridiculous as telling a cancer patient to cure himself. At the best depression compares to chronic physical pain, at the worst it is a debilitating and lethal condition.

However, when your life gets disrupted/disabled because of the depression, there are things you can and should do to make the life more bearable. You can't exorcise the monster completely, but you can learn to live with it.

It all starts from this question: do you want to be alive?

When I hit the bottom I had a revelation: I can keep on drinking, popping benzos the doctors kindly keep prescribing to me and wallowing in my despair, but it will kill me before I'm 40. I seriously considered that option as, to be honest, I didn't want to live that much. However, I didn't want to die either, because that would mean that the life and the universe had won by managing to crush me. So, in therapy I decided that I'll live - just to give the finger to life, the universe and the sadistic god who allegedly gave me this life devoid of any meaning. Go ahead, do you worst. I'll bend, but I will not break and give you the satisfaction.

That was my motivation, you've got to find yours.

The next step is to find something to do with all the empty hours. Initially, I spent quite a lot of time in therapy trying to find alternatives to drinking. Eventually I found another drug to replace the alcohol, sedatives and weed.

For me it was regimented exercise: bicycling, boxing and weight workouts. I enjoy reading, making plans and charting my progress in detail, so I read a lot of human physiology, anatomy, nutritional science and theory of sports, and turned my exercises into science.

Even if you don't drink or do recreational drugs, I think finding such a hobby or hobbies should help you cope with depression. I'm not saying that you should start exercising religiously, but try experimenting with different activities and see if you like any of them. If you don't like it, stop doing it and find something else. Experiment! Don't just think of a hobby and how (un)interesting it sounds. With a depression-prone personality, you'll just end up discarding all ideas before you even try them.

Heck, become a prepper and start making plans for the doomsday. I didn't believe in Y2K, but I did do prepping, because reading on survival techniques, creating a bug-out kit and planning for all kids of contingencies was simply fun!

If your depression is so bad that you can't think straight, get help. For me, the warning signs were unpaid bills (didn't care anymore), loss of all social life and spending all day in bed drunk/asleep. I know I'm going to get bashed for this, but my experience is that SSRI drugs (prozac-type medication) do help. They dull the sharpest mental pain and thus help you to gain back control over your life. You SHOULD NOT, however, settle just for the pills and keep popping them for the rest of your life. That's an easy solution for the doctors and they like to prescribe SSRI pills liberally just to get rid of you. The medication should ALWAYS be accompanied by therapy or at least peer support (someone who's been through the same experience) or maybe a family member or a friend who can truly relate to you. I don't recommend the last one, since helping someone deal with moderate/severe depression is extremely draining, especially if you're not suffering from the same condition.

I did SSRI drugs and Naltrexone (for controlling my alcoholism) for two years, but I haven't been taking them ever since. These pills did help by dulling the sharpest pain of depression and curbing my craving for alcohol, but cognitive therapy was the most effective ingredient in my recovery. Cognitive therapy is about helping you to spot harmful and disproportional thought patterns and how to correct them. It's rather fast and practical, and does not involve any of the stereotypical Freudian psychoanalysis of your earliest childhood memories, sexual dysfunction or mother-father grudges.

One more thing. You say that you try to tell yourself that tomorrow is going to be better. Don't waste your time on thinking about tomorrow - or the past, for that matter. This moment is what matters. Dwelling on the past or the future will just depress you more.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 21734520


Thank you for this!
 Quoting: CrossBone


What a fantastic post...open and honest. Great advice!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 14553694
Canada
11/29/2012 12:37 PM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
...


I bet not one was checked for Lyme Disease. The public doesn't understand that this is a worldwide problem and these are one of the symptoms along with 100 others. Anger is to top one..Once treated for a year ALL THE SYMPTOMS will be GONE.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14553694


Lyme disease is a bacterial infection not a mental health illness and some common symptoms being muscle and joint paint, numbess and tingling, speech problems and abnormal muscle movement, chills, fever, general ill feeling to name a few.
 Quoting: IrishCol


WrONG..It is a MENTAL illness and affects your brain. My son has it and he went mental
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14553694



I think you better research that again .. there's a big difference!!!!
 Quoting: IrishCol


IrishCol..I have spoken with MANY of the top scientists and Lyme doctors, they did the research and you will be reading their reports soon. YOU better do some research..
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 12774950
Canada
12/01/2012 10:09 AM
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Re: I live my entire life in a constant state of depression
I'm in my 40s now and I've lived with diagnosed, clinical depression all my life. In my 20s I was self-medicating myself liberally with alcohol, anxiolytes (mainly benzodiazepines) and occasional weed smoking. My depression and alcoholism got progressively worse and eventually my condition deteriorated into psychotic depression. I was hospitalized for some time.

My experiences from both depression and alcoholism is that they are a lot alike: there is no cure and the dark abyss of sickness is always there waiting for you to fall in.

You'll never be happy-go-lucky type of a personality, but that's OK. You are what you are. You may be dark, brooding and pessimistic, but that's your outlook on life and the society has no right to expect you to cheer up and take the "normal" maddeningly cheerful and disgustingly positive view on life. You should completely disregard the ignorant people who say that "oh, everybody gets the blues now and then" and then tell you to cheer up. They don't know shit about what real depression is like. The monster we have to live with has its fangs and nails embedded so deep in our brain tissue that telling us to cheer up is just as ridiculous as telling a cancer patient to cure himself. At the best depression compares to chronic physical pain, at the worst it is a debilitating and lethal condition.

However, when your life gets disrupted/disabled because of the depression, there are things you can and should do to make the life more bearable. You can't exorcise the monster completely, but you can learn to live with it.

It all starts from this question: do you want to be alive?

When I hit the bottom I had a revelation: I can keep on drinking, popping benzos the doctors kindly keep prescribing to me and wallowing in my despair, but it will kill me before I'm 40. I seriously considered that option as, to be honest, I didn't want to live that much. However, I didn't want to die either, because that would mean that the life and the universe had won by managing to crush me. So, in therapy I decided that I'll live - just to give the finger to life, the universe and the sadistic god who allegedly gave me this life devoid of any meaning. Go ahead, do you worst. I'll bend, but I will not break and give you the satisfaction.

That was my motivation, you've got to find yours.

The next step is to find something to do with all the empty hours. Initially, I spent quite a lot of time in therapy trying to find alternatives to drinking. Eventually I found another drug to replace the alcohol, sedatives and weed.

For me it was regimented exercise: bicycling, boxing and weight workouts. I enjoy reading, making plans and charting my progress in detail, so I read a lot of human physiology, anatomy, nutritional science and theory of sports, and turned my exercises into science.

Even if you don't drink or do recreational drugs, I think finding such a hobby or hobbies should help you cope with depression. I'm not saying that you should start exercising religiously, but try experimenting with different activities and see if you like any of them. If you don't like it, stop doing it and find something else. Experiment! Don't just think of a hobby and how (un)interesting it sounds. With a depression-prone personality, you'll just end up discarding all ideas before you even try them.

Heck, become a prepper and start making plans for the doomsday. I didn't believe in Y2K, but I did do prepping, because reading on survival techniques, creating a bug-out kit and planning for all kids of contingencies was simply fun!

If your depression is so bad that you can't think straight, get help. For me, the warning signs were unpaid bills (didn't care anymore), loss of all social life and spending all day in bed drunk/asleep. I know I'm going to get bashed for this, but my experience is that SSRI drugs (prozac-type medication) do help. They dull the sharpest mental pain and thus help you to gain back control over your life. You SHOULD NOT, however, settle just for the pills and keep popping them for the rest of your life. That's an easy solution for the doctors and they like to prescribe SSRI pills liberally just to get rid of you. The medication should ALWAYS be accompanied by therapy or at least peer support (someone who's been through the same experience) or maybe a family member or a friend who can truly relate to you. I don't recommend the last one, since helping someone deal with moderate/severe depression is extremely draining, especially if you're not suffering from the same condition.

I did SSRI drugs and Naltrexone (for controlling my alcoholism) for two years, but I haven't been taking them ever since. These pills did help by dulling the sharpest pain of depression and curbing my craving for alcohol, but cognitive therapy was the most effective ingredient in my recovery. Cognitive therapy is about helping you to spot harmful and disproportional thought patterns and how to correct them. It's rather fast and practical, and does not involve any of the stereotypical Freudian psychoanalysis of your earliest childhood memories, sexual dysfunction or mother-father grudges.

One more thing. You say that you try to tell yourself that tomorrow is going to be better. Don't waste your time on thinking about tomorrow - or the past, for that matter. This moment is what matters. Dwelling on the past or the future will just depress you more.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 21734520


Thank you for this!
 Quoting: CrossBone


What a fantastic post...open and honest. Great advice!
 Quoting: IrishCol


Yea! this is a good follow-up, Kind of reminds me of how my mom suffered. (she's not with us anymore),

I sure hope OP is Picking up what we are all putting down because it is all real positive, Except for a few comments..

And i hope

Anonymous Coward
User ID: 21734520
Finland
11/28/2012 04:22 AM
Is Doing well.

goodnews

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