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How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini

 
Intergalactic Diplomat
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How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider the necessity of alternative dimensional 'inflection points' to even define infinity?

If a particular mathamatical conclusion is a simple line above a series of numbers that repeat indefinately, how can we know there is not a divergance after, for example, the 1,0000,0000,000,000th repettition of said numbers? And this variance or divergence would be the anamoly, or 'alternative dimension' expressed in numbers that is necessary to preserve the integrity of the definition (or concept) of infinity?

Wouldn't a variance in the very definition of infinity be required that would cross multiple dimensions?
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Zero makes it possible.
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Zero makes it possible.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 26268975


0=0
So 0 to infinity is used to define a ficticious paradigm for the sake of i wonder what

So 0 as a fictional concept, can only be defined in mathamatics... can we define 0 or infinity outside of mathamatical parameters?

Last Edited by Intergalactic Diplomat on 12/20/2012 04:58 PM
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
You just don't get it.
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Zero makes it possible.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 26268975


So 0 as a fictional concept, can only be defined in mathamatics... can we define 0 or infinity outside of mathamatical parameters?
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat


You bet, e.g. zeroing the powers aka balance.
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Infinity is seen in every Fib Sequence~
Do the math that way maybe?
[link to en.wikipedia.org]
get-bent~
it's a vibe~
get-bent.com
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
How can 'infinity' be a viable mathematical concept when one must consider the necessity of alternative dimensional 'inflection points' to even define infinity?

If a particular mathematical conclusion is a simple line above a series of numbers that repeat indefinitely, how can we know there is not a divergance after, for example, the 1,0000,0000,000,000th repetition of said numbers? And this variance or divergence would be the anomaly, or 'alternative dimension' expressed in numbers that is necessary to preserve the integrity of the definition (or concept) of infinity?

Wouldn't a variance in the very definition of infinity be required that would cross multiple dimensions?
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat



Okay, that at least took care of your spelling errors, but I'm not even going to begin on the grammatical ones. It is however at least a beginning to helping you appear to be somewhat qualified to play pseudo-intellectual. By all means now, carry on.

cool2
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Humans do not have the proper hardware to apprehend infinity. Symbolic representations and abstract operations are as close as most will get without special training.
Intergalactic Diplomat (OP)

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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
How can 'infinity' be a viable mathematical concept when one must consider the necessity of alternative dimensional 'inflection points' to even define infinity?

If a particular mathematical conclusion is a simple line above a series of numbers that repeat indefinitely, how can we know there is not a divergance after, for example, the 1,0000,0000,000,000th repetition of said numbers? And this variance or divergence would be the anomaly, or 'alternative dimension' expressed in numbers that is necessary to preserve the integrity of the definition (or concept) of infinity?

Wouldn't a variance in the very definition of infinity be required that would cross multiple dimensions?
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat



Okay, that at least took care of your spelling errors, but I'm not even going to begin on the grammatical ones. It is however at least a beginning to helping you appear to be somewhat qualified to play pseudo-intellectual. By all means now, carry on.

cool2
 Quoting: Okie


Order... huayessir

Last Edited by Intergalactic Diplomat on 12/20/2012 05:05 PM
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Very close. Infinity is finite if observed from a dimension beyond its own bounds. A circle is infinite within one dimension. A sphere is infinite within two dimensions. To test this concept simply observe pi and how its accuracy for calculating spheres and circles can be adjusted from vague to infinity itself. Mathematical operations that work with infinity are quite possible and will be used extensively in the future to create new breakthroughs. The first step is accepting that when working with infinity accuracy is traded for speed the same as anything. Simple analog processing could be the first breakthrough on this road to better understanding. But the key is to start with fast inaccurate techniques and slowly improve the accuracy instead of the method we used for digital processing which started with accuracy and built speed. I always hope someone will understand what I write but they seldom do.
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Very close. Infinity is finite if observed from a dimension beyond its own bounds. A circle is infinite within one dimension. A sphere is infinite within two dimensions. To test this concept simply observe pi and how its accuracy for calculating spheres and circles can be adjusted from vague to infinity itself. Mathematical operations that work with infinity are quite possible and will be used extensively in the future to create new breakthroughs. The first step is accepting that when working with infinity accuracy is traded for speed the same as anything. Simple analog processing could be the first breakthrough on this road to better understanding. But the key is to start with fast inaccurate techniques and slowly improve the accuracy instead of the method we used for digital processing which started with accuracy and built speed. I always hope someone will understand what I write but they seldom do.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1018225


thanks for input

hf
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
|DEAD|SERIOUS

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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Because you don't understand infinity, you just live it.
God Leo
|DEAD|SERIOUS

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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
I might also add that the universe contracts after it expands. Humans are actually fallen angels from el nath
God Leo
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Infinity is seen in every Fib Sequence~
Do the math that way maybe?
[link to en.wikipedia.org]
 Quoting: Abalone~


spiral architechture

spock

Last Edited by Intergalactic Diplomat on 12/20/2012 05:13 PM
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
I might also add that the universe contracts after it expands. Humans are actually fallen angels from el nath
 Quoting: |DEAD|SERIOUS


Word, Vanilla Ice was fo sho.
|DEAD|SERIOUS

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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Infinity is seen in every Fib Sequence~
Do the math that way maybe?
[link to en.wikipedia.org]
 Quoting: Abalone~


spiral architechturespock
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat


Right. Pi vibrates 3 times. Because phi vibrates once. But phi also has an infinite state, it is all explained in the maya
God Leo
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider the necessity of alternative dimensional 'inflection points' to even define infinity?

If a particular mathamatical conclusion is a simple line above a series of numbers that repeat indefinately, how can we know there is not a divergance after, for example, the 1,0000,0000,000,000th repettition of said numbers? And this variance or divergence would be the anamoly, or 'alternative dimension' expressed in numbers that is necessary to preserve the integrity of the definition (or concept) of infinity?

Wouldn't a variance in the very definition of infinity be required that would cross multiple dimensions?
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat


pi goes on forever.

pi is the eye

dollar dollar bill ya
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Theoretical mathematicians think nothing of dividing by zero.

That's how they came up with the ridiculous concept (while masquerading as "physicists") of "Black Holes".

cruise
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Infinity is The Earth was formless and empty.
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider the necessity of alternative dimensional 'inflection points' to even define infinity?

If a particular mathamatical conclusion is a simple line above a series of numbers that repeat indefinately, how can we know there is not a divergance after, for example, the 1,0000,0000,000,000th repettition of said numbers? And this variance or divergence would be the anamoly, or 'alternative dimension' expressed in numbers that is necessary to preserve the integrity of the definition (or concept) of infinity?

Wouldn't a variance in the very definition of infinity be required that would cross multiple dimensions?
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat


The answer to this is endless
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider the necessity of alternative dimensional 'inflection points' to even define infinity?

If a particular mathamatical conclusion is a simple line above a series of numbers that repeat indefinately, how can we know there is not a divergance after, for example, the 1,0000,0000,000,000th repettition of said numbers? And this variance or divergence would be the anamoly, or 'alternative dimension' expressed in numbers that is necessary to preserve the integrity of the definition (or concept) of infinity?

Wouldn't a variance in the very definition of infinity be required that would cross multiple dimensions?
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat


pi goes on forever.

pi is the eye

dollar dollar bill ya
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 21761661


but does pi go on forever after the 3rd dimension collapses? and how is it 'represented' numerically? wouldnt it become a variant or rogue entity in the 3rd dimensional quantification ...and suddenly change or be 'interrupted' if it were a sound definition of a "infinate" subset of quantity?

i would imagine things of 'fictions' would be the only things destined for "destruction".... like the paradigm of the eye... not the eye itself

Last Edited by Intergalactic Diplomat on 12/20/2012 05:45 PM
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 30426509


lmao

@ Irony

"The Fixx"

"Saved by zero"



Great pull. Making more sense now

im in a state of nonsense

Last Edited by Intergalactic Diplomat on 12/20/2012 05:47 PM
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider the necessity of alternative dimensional 'inflection points' to even define infinity?

If a particular mathamatical conclusion is a simple line above a series of numbers that repeat indefinately, how can we know there is not a divergance after, for example, the 1,0000,0000,000,000th repettition of said numbers? And this variance or divergence would be the anamoly, or 'alternative dimension' expressed in numbers that is necessary to preserve the integrity of the definition (or concept) of infinity?

Wouldn't a variance in the very definition of infinity be required that would cross multiple dimensions?
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat


pi goes on forever.

pi is the eye

dollar dollar bill ya
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 21761661


but doe pi go on forever after the 3rd dimension collapses? and how is it 'represented' numerically? wouldnt it become a variant or rogue entity in the 3rd dimensional quantification ...and suddenly change or be 'interrupted' if it were a sound definition of a "infinate" subset of quantity?

i would imagine things of 'fictions' would be the only things destined for "destruction".... like the paradigm of the eye... not the eye itself
 Quoting: Intergalactic Diplomat

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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Ever tried to divide by zero on a calculator?

It cannot display the answer.

Now tell me,

what is the only value in the universe,

That cannot be displayed by an electronic screen?
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Ever tried to divide by zero on a calculator?

It cannot display the answer.

Now tell me,

what is the only value in the universe,

That cannot be displayed by an electronic screen?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 20063747


3d
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Re: How can 'infinity' be a viable mathamatical concept when one must consider an alternative dimensional inflection point to even define infini
Ever tried to divide by zero on a calculator?

It cannot display the answer.

Now tell me,

what is the only value in the universe,

That cannot be displayed by an electronic screen?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 20063747


3d
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 30443981


Indeed,

The fractal.

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