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How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1076652
United States
12/28/2012 10:56 PM
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How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
“People are always trying to smuggle drugs in,” said Gretl Plessinger, spokeswoman for the Florida Department of Corrections. “Our ultimate goal is to get rid of it, but I’d be a fool to tell you that will ever be realized.”

[link to www.washingtontimes.com]

So, how easy is it to get drugs in prison?


Drugs are easier to get inside prison than on the street – they just cost a lot more, says a 15-year inmate who testified Wednesday at the inquest into the death of prison activist Laurence Stocking.

[link to www.cbc.ca]

Seems it's pretty easy.

So, we obviously have a problem here. Are there any other methods to combat drug use other than criminilization?


Portugal presents the most significant and successful example of a post-criminalization, health-centered drug policy. In 2001, Portuguese legislators decriminalized low-level drug possession and reclassified it as an administrative violation. The explicit aim of the policy shift was to adopt an approach to drugs based not on dogmatic moralism and prejudice but on science and evidence. At the heart of this policy change was the recognition that the criminalization of drug use was not justifiable and that it was actually a barrier to more effective responses to drug use. Every objective analysis has clearly demonstrated that Portugal has drastically decreased its rates of violent crime, addiction, and disease transmission since reforming its drug laws.


[link to www.drugpolicy.org]

Other countries have successful drug programs that don't revolve around criminilization. So, why can't something similiar to Portugal's drug program work here?

Is it because we need workers in our prisons?


To be profitable, private prison firms must ensure that prisons are not only built but also filled. Industry experts say a 90-95 per cent capacity rate is needed to guarantee the hefty rates of return needed to lure investors. Prudential Securities issued a wildly bullish report on CCA a few years ago but cautioned, "It takes time to bring inmate population levels up to where they cover costs. Low occupancy is a drag on profits." Still, said the report, company earnings would be strong if CCA succeeded in ramp(ing) up population levels in its new facilities at an acceptable rate".

[link to www.apfn.org]

Could the war on drugs be used to keep our prison populations full? And in turn keep the profits high of corporations that own said prisons? Could be.

Lastly, i'll post some statistics about the war on drugs that may or may not surprise you.


Amount spent annually in the U.S. on the war on drugs: More than $51,000,000,000

Number of people arrested in 2010 in the U.S. on nonviolent drug charges: 1,638,846

Number of people arrested for a marijuana law violation in 2010: 853,838
■ Number of those charged with marijuana law violations who were arrested for possession only: 750,591 (88 percent)

Number of Americans incarcerated in 2009 in federal, state and local prisons and jails: 2,424,279 or 1 in every 99.1 adults, the highest incarceration rate in the world

Fraction of people incarcerated for a drug offense in state prison that are black or Hispanic, although these groups use and sell drugs at similar rates as whites: 2/3

Number of states that allow the medical use of marijuana: 16 + District of Columbia

Estimated annual revenue that California would raise if it taxed and regulated the sale of marijuana: $1,400,000,000

Number of murders in 2010 in Juarez, Mexico, the epicenter of that country’s drug war: 3,111, the highest murder rate of any city in the world

Number of students who have lost federal financial aid eligibility because of a drug conviction: 200,000+

Number of people in the U.S. that died from an accidental drug overdose in 2007: 27,658

Number of people annually infected with HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C by sharing contaminated syringes: 32,000

Tax revenue that drug legalization would yield annually, if currently-illegal drugs were taxed at rates comparable to those on alcohol and tobacco: $46.7 billion

[link to www.drugpolicy.org]
wisc_natureboy

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12/28/2012 11:00 PM

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Re: How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
Nice post OP, but I must state the obvious:

The war on drugs is nothing more than
the primary drug importer/dealer eliminating the competition.

riotpolice
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We all breathe the same air.
.-.. --- ...- . / .- .-.. .-..
(love/all)
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 1076652
United States
12/28/2012 11:05 PM
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Re: How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
The war on drugs is being used to fill private for-profit prison, among other things.

66: number of facilities owned and operated by Corrections Corporation of America, the country’s largest private prison company based on number of facilities
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 1076652
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12/28/2012 11:06 PM
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Re: How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
General Statistics:

1.6 million: Total number of state and federal prisoners in the United States as of December 2010, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics

128,195: Number of state and federal prisoners housed in private facilities as of December 2010

37: percent by which number of prisoners in private facilities increased between 2002 and 2009

217,690: Total federal inmate population as of May 2012, according to the Bureau of Prisons

27,970: Number of federal inmates in privately managed facilities within the Bureau of Prisons

33,330: Estimated size of detained immigrant population as of 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security



Corrections Corporation of America

66: number of facilities owned and operated by Corrections Corporation of America, the country’s largest private prison company based on number of facilities

91,000: number of beds available in CCA facilities across 20 states and the District of Columbia

$1.7 billion: total revenue recorded by CCA in 2011

$17.4 million: lobbying expenditures in the last 10 years, according to the Center for Responsive Politics

$1.9 million: total political contributions from years 2003 to 2012, according to the National Institute on Money in State Politics

$3.7 million: executive compensation for CEO Damon T. Hininger in 2011

132: recorded number of inmate-on-inmate assaults at CCA-run Idaho Correctional Center between Sept. 2007 and Sept. 2008



42: recorded number of inmate-on-inmate assaults at the state-run Idaho State Correctional Institution in the same time frame (both prisons at the time held about 1,500 inmates)

The Geo Group, Inc., the U.S.’s second largest private detention company

$1.6 billion: total revenue in year 2011, according to its annual report

65: number of domestic correctional facilities owned and operated by Geo Group, Inc.

65,716: number of beds available in Geo Group, Inc.’s domestic correctional facilities

$2.5 million: lobbying expenditures in the last 8 years, according to the Center for Responsive Politics

$2.9 million: total political contributions from years 2003 to 2012, according to the National Institute on Money in State Politics

$5.7 million: executive compensation for CEO George C. Zoley in 2011

$6.5 million: damages awarded in a wrongful death lawsuit against the company last June for the beating death of an inmate by his cellmate at a GEO Group-run Oklahoma prison. An appeal has been filed and is pending.

$1.1 million: fine levied against the company in November 2011 by the New Mexico Department of Corrections for inadequate staffing at one of its prisons
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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12/28/2012 11:09 PM
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Re: How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
Nice post OP, but I must state the obvious:

The war on drugs is nothing more than
the primary drug importer/dealer eliminating the competition.

:riotpolice:
 Quoting: wisc_natureboy


Thank you. I also agree, the US government (CIA) is the largest drug dealer in the world. The money they make goes towards black projects that are never known to the public.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 29757648
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12/28/2012 11:11 PM
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Re: How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
so if somebody gets murdered in prison, that means there is no point trying to stop people from getting murdered outside prison?
ANHEDONIC

User ID: 26795689
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12/28/2012 11:17 PM

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Re: How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
Well done.

clappa

"You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger"
nightlight7

User ID: 20322482
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12/28/2012 11:25 PM
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Re: How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
There are many other entities and interests benefiting from WOD besides the prison industry.

2) Big Pharma & medical industry get to sell you their drugs and treatments for depression, anxiety, pain,...

3) Large bureacracies (DEA, law enforcement) get more funding and power.

4) Government gets to beef up its forces and gradually chip off constitutional protections of the population (such as privacy, property rights).

5) Government also gets to pick out and lock away the segments of population most likely to disobey the laws in general.

6) Majority population gets to keep the minority males during their peak reproductive years away from the majority females (or any females). This used to be completely overt and chief rationale in the early decades of drug prohibitions in 19th and early 20th century. Presently of course, it is quietly understood and accepted by the majority.

With such alliance behind, it's no wonder the seemingly irrational and expensive WOD is kept alive.
Anonymous Coward
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12/28/2012 11:26 PM
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Re: How can we win the war on drugs in the streets, when we can't even win it in our prisons?
Nice post OP, but I must state the obvious:

The war on drugs is nothing more than
the primary drug importer/dealer eliminating the competition.

:riotpolice:
 Quoting: wisc_natureboy


Exactly. Perfect one sentence summary. All the border smuggling is nothing compared with the jet liners flying thousands of keys into the states on an offically sponsored run. Governments are the world's biggest drug dealers and control the supply at the very top, with military assets and bases forming the importing and distribution side of things.

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