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Unschooling?

 
teacup
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User ID: 32093471
Australia
01/13/2013 04:14 AM

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Unschooling?
What is this new fad that thinks the education system is evil?

I'm sending mine to school to be indoctrinated.
teacup (OP)

User ID: 32093471
Australia
01/13/2013 04:16 AM

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Re: Unschooling?
For those who haven't heard of it, its homeschooling. Except you don't teach your kids anything unless they show an interest and want to learn about it.

So they guide their own education.
teacup (OP)

User ID: 32093471
Australia
01/13/2013 04:19 AM

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Re: Unschooling?
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Anti Vortex

User ID: 32092929
United Kingdom
01/13/2013 06:47 AM

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Re: Unschooling?
Sounds fine unless they've already had any desire to learn killed in school, in which case they would do nothing but sit around playing video games all day.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 4901221
Australia
02/06/2013 09:17 PM
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Re: Unschooling?
unschooling is the only way to learn anything real!
WindyMind

User ID: 26518293
United States
02/06/2013 09:24 PM

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Re: Unschooling?
This is what my daughter said she is going to do.

I hate it.

What to do?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 33836610
United States
02/06/2013 09:28 PM
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Re: Unschooling?
For those who haven't heard of it, its homeschooling. Except you don't teach your kids anything unless they show an interest and want to learn about it.

So they guide their own education.
 Quoting: teacup


It works too!!

Kids are amazing.

Intentionally, one year, I didn't show my son how to ride his bike. I bought him the bike took off the training wheels and said here you go.

In two days he had figured it out and he was so proud of himself.

He still talks about how he taught himself to ride a bike, 3 years later.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 33836610
United States
02/06/2013 09:50 PM
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Re: Unschooling?
I wish this thread would take off.

This topic hasn't been debated at all on GLP.

I would be interested to see what different people think of it.

Plus, I have 8 years experience with it so I can add personal insights.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 904314
Canada
02/06/2013 09:53 PM
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Re: Unschooling?
Homeschooling's been around, but I think in N.A. you still need to pass examinations and stuff to show that you are actually learning something.

As for the school system, it's over-crowded, teachers don't have the time to give individual attention to each students, school ends up being about blind memorizing of data instead of learning how to think.

A novel is also full of data, but if it sits on your desk by itself, it's just a pile of dead tree!
WindyMind

User ID: 26518293
United States
02/07/2013 12:11 AM

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Re: Unschooling?
What is pro and con about no schooling?

Con
If a kid didn't want to learn to tie his shoes he could be a 10 year old that can't tie his shoes.

If a kid didn't want to learn to read, she would be illiterate.

A teacher is a faster way to learn, much faster than figuring it out yourself.

I am studying TV now, all the kid does is watch TV.

Pro
Freedom to do what you please.

No schedules to follow.

No stress from school, no bullying, no cafeteria food.

You can do whatever you want all day long.


I don't like public schools and I don't like no schooling because I think the kid will grow up to be an idiot.

Prove me wrong, how does it work?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 33782480
United States
02/07/2013 01:01 AM
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Re: Unschooling?
You have to be creative to 'unschool'.

I 'unschooled' two boys K-12. Both of them now thank me for doing so. Say they had a much better education than any of their public schooled friends.

One is an electrician (chose not to go to college).

Other is a Physics/engineering major.

What I did was 'listen' as the kids would discuss something - often from a show on tv (usually just educational tv, but sometimes old movies as well). Then I would pick a topic of interest and weave science, math, history, social studies, and reading into it.

We would often follow a broad subject for a week or two, making field trips (if plausible), library trips, whatever we could think of.

Some subjects would only last a day or two. But whatever it was, we followed it through the entire curriculum.

When we got to take vacations, they were also 'learning' trips. At least 1/3 of our trunk was educational materials.

My kids even learned from video games. Ex: One they were playing had a trebuchet as a weapon. So we studied how and where they were created, the mathmatics and physics of trajectory, and they even built one in our backyard and we would play 'math' games of figuring out where objects would land based on their size and shape.

When scouts had a soap box derby - we studied the history, then the math and engineering of axles and weight and balance. (They won, btw, because of their complete understanding of motion and balance)

To this day, my kids carry a copy of the constitution with them, and quite often quote from it to their friends.

It is NOT for everyone, but it is fun. It takes parents that are willing to change their patterns of thought to really listen and see what their kids want to learn. And then develop the creativity to make it fun and interesting on top of being educational.

AND, you have to teach yourself to be their parent and their teacher - not their friend - during this time of their life. I am lucky now, they have chosen to be our friends - our best friends.

Unfortunately, too many parents drop the ball, or just use it as an excuse not to teach their kids.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 589518
Australia
02/07/2013 01:03 AM
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Re: Unschooling?
learnings the devils work
cabbage_goddess

User ID: 19207131
United States
02/07/2013 08:27 AM

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Re: Unschooling?
You have to be creative to 'unschool'.

I 'unschooled' two boys K-12. Both of them now thank me for doing so. Say they had a much better education than any of their public schooled friends.

One is an electrician (chose not to go to college).

Other is a Physics/engineering major.

What I did was 'listen' as the kids would discuss something - often from a show on tv (usually just educational tv, but sometimes old movies as well). Then I would pick a topic of interest and weave science, math, history, social studies, and reading into it.

We would often follow a broad subject for a week or two, making field trips (if plausible), library trips, whatever we could think of.

Some subjects would only last a day or two. But whatever it was, we followed it through the entire curriculum.

When we got to take vacations, they were also 'learning' trips. At least 1/3 of our trunk was educational materials.

My kids even learned from video games. Ex: One they were playing had a trebuchet as a weapon. So we studied how and where they were created, the mathmatics and physics of trajectory, and they even built one in our backyard and we would play 'math' games of figuring out where objects would land based on their size and shape.

When scouts had a soap box derby - we studied the history, then the math and engineering of axles and weight and balance. (They won, btw, because of their complete understanding of motion and balance)

To this day, my kids carry a copy of the constitution with them, and quite often quote from it to their friends.

It is NOT for everyone, but it is fun. It takes parents that are willing to change their patterns of thought to really listen and see what their kids want to learn. And then develop the creativity to make it fun and interesting on top of being educational.

AND, you have to teach yourself to be their parent and their teacher - not their friend - during this time of their life. I am lucky now, they have chosen to be our friends - our best friends.

Unfortunately, too many parents drop the ball, or just use it as an excuse not to teach their kids.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 33782480


This is the best example of unschooling I've ever read because you took the time to give concrete examples and had long term results to offer from your experience.

We homeschool and I've tinkered with unschooling but I've alway been afraid my kids wouldn't "do" anything. They are one- (not schooling, obviously), four- and six-years-old.

The two oldest boys love Legos - which I realize is a great learning tool - my oldest especially has shown a great aptitude for building complicated structures that move and games that involve dice. Are you familiar with the Ninjago game series? He's assigned a complicated dice-move system for his own home-grown Ninjago game because before Christmas we were too cheap to buy him the real deal :) . His dad can play our son's version, he (my husband) says it's inadvertently similar to role-model play games, which he's familiar with, so like father, like son, I suppose.

My husband WAS an unschooler, despite going to public school. He's taught himself everything he needs to know for his job in computer engineering at one of the larger IT companies in the country, no college degree. He's been given worldwide recognition for his work and many promotions which have luckily enabled me to quit working and homeschool our children (tooting his horn a little; he says I never do, unfortunately he'll never see that I did!). So yes, it works! I'm just reticent :)

Right now we are going down the classical education path which is structured, but we don't use workbooks (math, excepting, though we do mix it up), and we emphasize reading, reading, reading. If they're doing a craft on Africa, I'm reading about it. We're plowing thorough different series of their choosing. First it was Henry Huggins, now it's the Little House series which will come in handy when the SHTF. I caught my eldest working ON HIS OWN BIDDING on art yesterday at 5 pm so I have hope that someday we might be able to unschool to some degree! I almost cried I was so happy, he's the one I have the hardest time with. My middle child is so curious, loves to learn, is artistic, intuitive, but mercurial. So they each have their issues (they're KIDS you know, lol) but my eldest...first grade has been difficult. And because of where we live he has to take a stupid "achievement" test next year and it has me needlessly worried. I am not going to stress this to him, just tell him it's a test, let him take a practice one through a bookseller that will supply and grade one and then have him do the real deal. We live in a tough homeschooling state, especially for someone whose political ideology is anarchy when it comes to education. Libertarian defines me otherwise but leave my dern kids alone!!

I think we will try unschooling this summer and see how it goes. I'm going to cut and paste your post into a Word doc, if that is okay.

Boys totally CANNOT sit at a desk for six hours a day and be expected to stay still and learn, that's insane. No wonder so many are drugged. Mine would be, and for no reason, except for being his naturally wiggly self. Hell, they'd have ME medicated and I am a woman in my 30's! I couldn't do it!

Alright, I'm veering off on a tangent, but I was so glad to see this thread. I too, hope it stays alive!

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