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I'm an Atheist. Why should I believe in a god? Which god? and why?

 
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 32076855
United Kingdom
01/30/2013 03:53 PM
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Re: I'm an Atheist. Why should I believe in a god? Which god? and why?
Why still about today? Because the concept is still in circulation.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 85989
United States
01/30/2013 04:19 PM
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Re: I'm an Atheist. Why should I believe in a god? Which god? and why?
Do any of you ask yourselves why we even debate the existence of a Creator? The fact that this is a question on our minds begs the question of "why we desire to know the answer to this question". Where there exists a desire there first existed a need. A purely materialistic naturalistic existence would never spawn the desire to ask the question "who or what created us" and "what is our purpose"? We ask these questions because we are meant to seek the answers. In essence, our question about "who created us" helps to prove the existence of a Creator.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 85989


Thank goodness! The philosopher is back! Logic and reason have re-entered the discussion. Quite correct! Posing the question, is much like Descartes "I think therefore I am".

A neuroscientist might say though that the reason we ask is the pineal glad produces biochemicals.

The inner desire to posit the Prime Mover, the original force that set the Universe in motion, makes us think of God. If so, is that the basis for wondering about a relationship with such a being, and hence how spiritual systems happen?

This is so much better than the blather being discussed most of the time here.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Amen brother. While I enjoy a good conspiracy conversation, we need to keep asking the bigger questions. The questions with eternal implications. Maybe the biggest conspiracy of all is that people think they can go on living without God and Truth. The neuroscientists are good at answering questions with a lower case "q". But we need people to continue asking the big Questions. Don'tBeAfraid, I'm glad to see you representing Truth in this post. Like your name, as well... in His presense all fear is gone.
NightWisp

User ID: 33347692
United States
01/30/2013 04:33 PM

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Re: I'm an Atheist. Why should I believe in a god? Which god? and why?
You were given free will to choose what you wanted to choose in that regard.

However. God sent the rules he would judge your choices by.
Don'tBeAfraid

User ID: 32113282
United States
01/30/2013 11:29 PM

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Re: I'm an Atheist. Why should I believe in a god? Which god? and why?
Do any of you ask yourselves why we even debate the existence of a Creator? The fact that this is a question on our minds begs the question of "why we desire to know the answer to this question". Where there exists a desire there first existed a need. A purely materialistic naturalistic existence would never spawn the desire to ask the question "who or what created us" and "what is our purpose"? We ask these questions because we are meant to seek the answers. In essence, our question about "who created us" helps to prove the existence of a Creator.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 85989


Thank goodness! The philosopher is back! Logic and reason have re-entered the discussion. Quite correct! Posing the question, is much like Descartes "I think therefore I am".

A neuroscientist might say though that the reason we ask is the pineal glad produces biochemicals.

The inner desire to posit the Prime Mover, the original force that set the Universe in motion, makes us think of God. If so, is that the basis for wondering about a relationship with such a being, and hence how spiritual systems happen?

This is so much better than the blather being discussed most of the time here.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Amen brother. While I enjoy a good conspiracy conversation, we need to keep asking the bigger questions. The questions with eternal implications. Maybe the biggest conspiracy of all is that people think they can go on living without God and Truth. The neuroscientists are good at answering questions with a lower case "q". But we need people to continue asking the big Questions. Don'tBeAfraid, I'm glad to see you representing Truth in this post. Like your name, as well... in His presense all fear is gone.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 85989

"There is no fear in love. But perfect love drives out fear, because fear has to do with punishment. The one who fears is not made perfect in love." 1 John 4:18

The great questions of life are always discussed with the realms of philosophy and spirituality. A scientist, no matter how disciplined, will not use science to explain the meaning of life. Science has no answers there for that question.

Who are we? What is our purpose? Why am I here? How did I get here? Is there life after death? How did the world come to be? Does God exist?

These are the great questions. All such questions must be by definition speculative, for each being will have different answers and limited ways to precisely prove the answers.

They are universal questions. All beings want answers to them. Even if an atheist, you cannot find answers in science, not satisfying ones.

As far as I know, the only overlap is in quantum mechanics and specifically within the aspect that the observer affects reality.

The larger question there is, do many observers each acting independently affect more reality? If so, that has huge implications in philosophy and sprituality. For as such, our ideas about the nature of the Universe may directly affect reality, and so our belief systems may as well.

Last Edited by Don'tBeAfraid on 01/30/2013 11:41 PM

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