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Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 29666542
United States
02/01/2013 08:36 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Well, try to run barefoot in conrete jungle, see what happens.

You can still run barefoot however or whenever you wish...

It doesn't mean they were brilliant back then, probably were dumber than current gamer children.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 33440136


They were happier! They were children! And they actually got to be children, not like today, where they only have to be mindless, sitting in front of a computer or tv and letting the tv do the thinking for them. Unless you were there, you just don't know.
 Quoting: katballoo


They only mindlessly sit on front of the computer because someone bought it and placed it in front of them. I am divorced for one main reason. My ex wanted to keep up with all of the technology for my young daughters. Now at least when they are at my house, they eat organically grown food that I grow, they either play outside using their imagination or they can play inside, usually reading or drawing or working on a hook rug or playing with Lincoln logs.

They are eight years old and for the past 4 years I have not had a tv or video game in the house. One night a week, we will make popcorn and watch a pre-screened family movie or a little house on the prairie episode through the computer.

I can walk out any day and get photos as good or better than these. We all have choices. Both of my daughters are A students and one of them has been chosen the top student in the "gifted" class two years running. She is in 2nd grade and is outdoing the entire elementary school, reading novels since she was 6.

Every parent has the choice. Choose not to use the electronic babysitters.
katballoo

User ID: 33434547
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02/01/2013 08:38 AM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
I was born in 1959, and every day in the summer my friends and I would go swimming, and wander from beach to beach by way of the railroad tracks. As long as we were home by dinner time, we did what we pretty much wanted. We had BIG imaginations, and we were always coming up with so many different things to do. Television was around by then, but I did not live in front of it, maybe spent a couple hours in the morning watching Captain Kangaroo, Friendly Giant, Might Mouse, but I always wanted to get outside and play. Snow in the winter...barefeet in the summer...those were the days!
 Quoting: katballoo


I would love that kind of childhood! I was born in the city and never had anything like that to do. All there is to do is find a basketball court for summer time and hockey rink for winter. Other than that there was video games and shopping malls with all the new stuff we couldn't afford.
 Quoting: IceJunkie


Yes...there is a big difference from growing up in the city then smaller town. But, at least you were getting out and playing hockey and basketball, which is a great thing to do. We used to go skating in the winter. Sometimes on the lake, sometimes at the arena. In summer, we would also go horsebackriding, when we could afford it. We didn't have much money to do alot of costly recreation.

I think playing video games and watching tv are fine. I just think that ONLY watching tv and playing video games, is definitely a problem. That means NO activity, and a person is constantly being bombarded with unhealthy waves.
Don'tBeAfraid

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02/01/2013 08:38 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Times changed. Do you wish we all lived like cavemen and hunted for food as well? You can still do those things in the pictures but you choose not to because why?
 Quoting: IceJunkie


That is a very silly question...just think about what you are asking. Why are you being so defensive?

You can't do those things in the pictures anymore, period. Unless, of course, you want your children to get some disease from the ground, or you want some pervert to carry your child away. And the many other things that I don't have to time to mention. Times for children were better back then, that is for sure.
 Quoting: katballoo


I disagree. We can make the world more innocent, especially people who decide to raise their own food. Yes, you can chose to live in those urban areas, or you can live in a rural place like me where mostly things are safer. Child abuse happens everywhere. So do horrific things like the abuse of women. You can live in that world, or you can pull away from it and reject all of the problems of urbanization.
Turtles Voice
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02/01/2013 08:40 AM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Very nice post flower

Karma to you :)
"In order to arrive at what you are not,
You must go through the way in which you are not."

-TS Eliot

[link to www.turtlesvoice.com]

New book - ROTTEN [link to www.amazon.com]
The zombie apocalypse is now.

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Don'tBeAfraid

User ID: 33440387
United States
02/01/2013 08:42 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Very nice post flower

Karma to you :)
 Quoting: Turtles Voice

You're very kind. I guess it wasn't common for the people of GLP, at least the ones who've commented so far. It was an absolutely normal common childhood.
katballoo

User ID: 33434547
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02/01/2013 08:44 AM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
oh yeah wonderful. When women got raped, they didn't complain. My grandfather was unfaithful to my grandmother. My dad when he was in HS would go around with his gang and beat up people for fun. People were the same. They just pretended that everything was great.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 30474188


I see your point on those things. All of those things were around, they were just more "hush hush". There was still child molesting, gay people, women getting beaten...but, it just wasn't as much. Plus, there are so many other things that were better. Unless you were there, it is hard to explain. Geez, even I wasn't there, not THAT far back. Far enough though, to see the benefits that the children had then, to what they have now.
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 08:48 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
No, it was not a utopia back then. It was way hard and people were way hard too. We might have longer life expectancy now but there are things worse than death. One might be turning into one of these genetically...alien03 I hear they live a long time. Has there really ever been good time to be a human on earth...in flesh? Nope. But at least you weren't being genetically altered and died earlier back then. ( minus the days of noah...this shit was going on then too)
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 08:48 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Many people commenting seen to be nostalgic of those times. Don't let that cloud your judgment! Technology is incredibly important and it always has been, it is what gave you fire and the wheel , horse shoes, fences, the clothes you wear! It was as important in the mid 20th century as it is today. The problem is not computers, plastics, microwaves and fossil fuels. The problem is human greed, impatience, ignorance, tunnel vision. What if after building an engine that ran on fossil fuel we had kept researching until we had something clean before mass producing it?
Granted technology is poorly used today and instead of spending on health we spend on war. But one should not wish to "go back to the good ol' days" they don't exist anymore. How about we wish for a great future instead with balance between technology and nature.
Pyractomena borealis

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02/01/2013 08:50 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Innocence....lovely is it not?

Nice OP.

hf
There is nothing so powerful as truth, and often nothing so strange ~ Daniel Webster

Omnia Vincit Amor ~ Virgil

The more you learn, the less you know ~ Socrates

That writer does the most, who gives his reader the most knowledge, and takes from him the least time. ~ Charles Caleb Colton
Don'tBeAfraid

User ID: 33440387
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02/01/2013 08:51 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
oh yeah wonderful. When women got raped, they didn't complain. My grandfather was unfaithful to my grandmother. My dad when he was in HS would go around with his gang and beat up people for fun. People were the same. They just pretended that everything was great.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 30474188


I see your point on those things. All of those things were around, they were just more "hush hush". There was still child molesting, gay people, women getting beaten...but, it just wasn't as much. Plus, there are so many other things that were better. Unless you were there, it is hard to explain. Geez, even I wasn't there, not THAT far back. Far enough though, to see the benefits that the children had then, to what they have now.
 Quoting: katballoo


Yeah, my grandfather was a traveling salesman, and he no doubt had affairs. I was really close to my grandma and years after he died, she never once complained about him. I even broached the subject and she didn't appear whatsoever upset about "his ways". Maybe in her case, she was relieved, who knows?

Rapes were so rare around here. If someone hurt someone i.e. went too far and seldom rape, they were liable to be put in the hospital and beaten badly by the local families and would have to move away or risk being found with a knife in their chest. Maybe that seems uncivilized, but the threat of it made those asshats move away.

Last Edited by Don'tBeAfraid on 02/01/2013 08:52 AM
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 08:53 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Get over it you old fucks.
Those days are over.
katballoo

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02/01/2013 08:54 AM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
The nostalgia, reflections of the past and lamentations are fine but be very careful all to not further abuse the victims again by blaming them for the condition we are in. It is of utmost importance that those who can see point the fingers in the right directions, place the blame in the right place, not place blame on the "children playing x box" because the "children playing x box" have had no say in the matter, are not in control are really would rather be doing these things that we look back on but they are not able to and it is not their faults they cannot wander around the woods and streams carefree with their mates, not a care in the world, singing, climbling and free of worry. They cannot do that. Kids have not been able to do that since the early 70s maybe.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 14965262


This is true...I lay no blame on the youth of today. I feel sorry for how it is. I wish the children had the same chance to have the freedom and carefree life that I did when I was a child.
Chris12138

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02/01/2013 08:54 AM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Hell even in the years of Super Nintendo, Sega etc when I was a kid our moms used to have to yell at us to come inside.

It's really sad now in my early/mid 20's to drive through my old neighborhood and not see any kids out on the street where during my youngster years you could barely drive because there would be so many of us running around playing hide and seek, riding bikes etc, kids littered the streets. Now they're all inside calling each other the N Word on Call of Duty.....

verysad

It's ok though. I know at least when I have children I won't let them grow up to be slaves of the idiot box.

Last Edited by Gator! on 02/01/2013 08:55 AM
Don'tBeAfraid

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02/01/2013 08:55 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Many people commenting seen to be nostalgic of those times. Don't let that cloud your judgment! Technology is incredibly important and it always has been, it is what gave you fire and the wheel , horse shoes, fences, the clothes you wear! It was as important in the mid 20th century as it is today. The problem is not computers, plastics, microwaves and fossil fuels. The problem is human greed, impatience, ignorance, tunnel vision. What if after building an engine that ran on fossil fuel we had kept researching until we had something clean before mass producing it?
Granted technology is poorly used today and instead of spending on health we spend on war. But one should not wish to "go back to the good ol' days" they don't exist anymore. How about we wish for a great future instead with balance between technology and nature.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1354730


Why can't you have both/and? These permie folks...I don't know if you've heard of them? They're a lot like the Back to the Land movement during the late seventies. They're innocent, kind hearted, agrarians, use technology in some ways and are no Luddites for sure, but also are practicing the ancestral skills. They're learning about new farming methods like Hugelkulture. I encourage you to read about them.
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 08:55 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Very nice post flower

Karma to you :)
 Quoting: Turtles Voice

You're very kind. I guess it wasn't common for the people of GLP, at least the ones who've commented so far. It was an absolutely normal common childhood.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Yes that was a lovely post. I've posted similar stuff about my childhood on a UK forum, and got told I was imagining it! They just won't accept how much less stressful life was then - and I grew up in London! We played in the streets, popped in and out of each other's houses, went off to the common to catch fish (tiddlers) - not a worry in the world.
katballoo

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Canada
02/01/2013 09:00 AM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


flower
Don'tBeAfraid

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02/01/2013 09:00 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Very nice post flower

Karma to you :)
 Quoting: Turtles Voice

You're very kind. I guess it wasn't common for the people of GLP, at least the ones who've commented so far. It was an absolutely normal common childhood.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Yes that was a lovely post. I've posted similar stuff about my childhood on a UK forum, and got told I was imagining it! They just won't accept how much less stressful life was then - and I grew up in London! We played in the streets, popped in and out of each other's houses, went off to the common to catch fish (tiddlers) - not a worry in the world.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 33447478


I'm glad you also had good experiences. As a boy, I collected stamps since my dad was a sailor, and I'd read about all the countries and thing, "How wonderful it would be to visit the Angor Wat or London or see the Pyramids or Peru, and talk to other people and hear about their experiences and childhood".

Sure we had hardships. But they weren't unrelenting. I think people either had terrible childhoods, or they've forgotten the good times.
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 09:02 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Not only healthy.

See these kids are happy and love each other.

See the little boy with his arm around the girl next to him?

Just think, this was all before......
Separation of church from state
Welfare
Abortion
Gay rights

Care to add to this list?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 32715303


There's a lot of truth in your statement.

During this time frame there also wasn't rampant crimes, gangs on every street, multi-cultural bullshit, and the liberal/progressive/communist ideals that are shoved down everyone's throat these days

"Social Progress" has royally fucked up society
 Quoting: Nemamiah


Now we have gotten so out of hand that the gov has stopped allowing private business to permit their customers to smoke in their own private establishments. This is just one example how our freedoms (and mental health/quality of life) are diminishing under the guise of "progress".
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 09:02 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
I remember stepping on a nail that wen't all the way through,taking off my T-shirt, ripping it , and tieing my foot up to stop the bleeding, as I walked limping back home two miles through woods barefoot in just my bathing suit. We would hike out to this hidden frog pond and catch huge bullfrogs. Crazy..could have been eaten by wolves or bears.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 25676821
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02/01/2013 09:04 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Well, try to run barefoot in conrete jungle, see what happens.

You can still run barefoot however or whenever you wish...

It doesn't mean they were brilliant back then, probably were dumber than current gamer children.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 33440136


Really?
Prolly had to take this exam to graduate. Care to try it yourself? Have fun.

EXAMINATION GRADUATION QUESTIONS
OF SALINE COUNTY, KANSAS
April 13, 1895
J.W. Armstrong, County Superintendent.

Examinations at Salina, New Cambria, Gypsum City, Assaria, Falun, Bavaria, and District No. 74 (in Glendale Twp.)

Reading and Penmanship. - The Examination will be oral, and the Penmanship of Applicants will be graded from the manuscripts

Grammar (Time, one hour)

1. Give nine rules for the use of Capital Letters.
2. Name the Parts of Speech and define those that have no modifications.
3. Define Verse, Stanza and Paragraph.
4. What are the Principal Parts of a verb? Give Principal Parts of do, lie, lay and run.
5. Define Case, Illustrate each Case.
6. What is Punctuation? Give rules for principal marks of Punctuation.
7-10. Write a composition of about 150 words and show therein that you understand the practical use of the rules of grammar.

Arithmetic (Time, 1.25 hours)

1. Name and define the Fundamental Rules of Arithmetic.
2. A wagon box is 2 ft. deep, 10 feet long, and 3 ft. wide. How many bushels of wheat will it hold?
3. If a load of wheat weighs 3942 lbs., what is it worth at 50 cts. per bu, deducting 1050 lbs. for tare?
4. District No. 33 has a valuation of $35,000. What is the necessary levy to carry on a school seven months at $50 per month, and have $104 for incidentals?
5. Find cost of 6720 lbs. coal at $6.00 per ton.
6. Find the interest of $512.60 for 8 months and 18 days at 7 percent.
7. What is the cost of 40 boards 12 inches wide and 16 ft. long at $.20 per inch?
8. Find bank discount on $300 for 90 days (no grace) at 10 percent.
9. What is the cost of a square farm at $15 per acre, the distance around which is 640 rods?
10. Write a Bank Check, a Promissory Note, and a Receipt.

U.S. History (Time, 45 minutes)

1. Give the epochs into which U.S. History is divided.
2. Give an account of the discovery of America by Columbus.
3. Relate the causes and results of the Revolutionary War.
4. Show the territorial growth of the United States.
5. Tell what you can of the history of Kansas.
6. Describe three of the most prominent battles of the Rebellion.
7. Who were the following: Morse, Whitney, Fulton, Bell, Lincoln, Penn, and Howe?
8. Name events connected with the following dates: 1607, 1620, 1800, 1849, and 1865?

Orthography (Time, one hour)

1. What is meant by the following: Alphabet, phonetic orthography, etymology, syllabication?
2. What are elementary sounds? How classified?
3. What are the following, and give examples of each: Trigraph, subvocals, diphthong, cognate letters, linguals?
4. Give four substitutes for caret 'u'.
5. Give two rules for spelling words with final 'e'. Name two exceptions under each rule.
6. Give two uses of silent letters in spelling. Illustrate each.
7. Define the following prefixes and use in connection with a word: Bi, dis, mis, pre, semi, post, non, inter, mono, super.
8. Mark diacritically and divide into syllables the following, and name the sign that indicates the sound: Card, ball, mercy, sir, odd, cell, rise, blood, fare, last.
9. Use the following correctly in sentences, Cite, site, sight, fane, fain, feign, vane, vain, vein, raze, raise, rays.
10. Write 10 words frequently mispronounced and indicate pronunciation by use of diacritical marks and by syllabication.

Geography (Time, one hour)

1. What is climate? Upon what does climate depend?
2. How do you account for the extremes of climate in Kansas?
3. Of what use are rivers? Of what use is the ocean?
4. Describe the mountains of N.A.
5. Name and describe the following: Monrovia, Odessa, Denver, Manitoba, Hecla, Yukon, St. Helena, Juan Fernandez, Aspinwall and Orinoco.
6. Name and locate the principal trade centers of the U.S.
7. Name all the republics of Europe and give capital of each.
8. Why is the Atlantic Coast colder than the Pacific in the same latitude?
9. Describe the process by which the water of the ocean returns to the sources of rivers.
10. Describe the movements of the earth. Give inclination of the earth.

Health (Time, 45 minutes)

1. Where are the saliva, gastric juice, and bile secreted? What is the use of each in digestion?
2. How does nutrition reach the circulation?
3. What is the function of the liver? Of the kidneys?
4. How would you stop the flow of blood from an artery in the case of laceration?
5. Give some general directions that you think would be beneficial to preserve the human body in a state of health.

[link to www.barefootsworld.net]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 25676821
United States
02/01/2013 09:06 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Get over it you old fucks.
Those days are over.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 31684809


^^^^^ THIS ^^^^^




Is what's wrong with today's "children."
So sad.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 3960495
United States
02/01/2013 09:07 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Life is SOOOO much more stressful for kids and adults alike nowadays on a regular basis. Its funny to think how much effort think tanks and lawmakers put in to try and better the public's life in modern times when we clearly are not improving in terms of happiness.

One thing that has progressed is healthcare treatment and we should be happy for that. But, aat the same time, doesnt it seem like people are too medicated nowadays.

Anyway, wish people would just relax, enjoy their families and life instead of always trying to make phony progress
Don'tBeAfraid

User ID: 33440387
United States
02/01/2013 09:08 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
And folks, don't think we were obtuse. Even at 7 I can remember seeing Vietnam and wondering why we were there, and feeling horrible for those people and especially the children. Remember we didn't have CNN and FOX, but everyone watched the news faithfully and read the paper. We knew what was going on, for our dads were fighting and we wanted them to come home.

Even coming from conservative homes, we reached out when the Vietnames boat people came over as refugees even in my little town. There were some idiot rednecks, but mostly people were nice to them. We wanted them to be able to escape from the terror that had been their lives.

We saw the race riots on television, and it was a big deal when some African-American person became a professional. I'm old enough that I worked with many of the first in many walks of life, and mostly they were welcomed.

I kind of scratch my head because I'm just as aware of all of those social issues, it's just that country people take care of each other.
Don'tBeAfraid

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United States
02/01/2013 09:12 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
I remember stepping on a nail that wen't all the way through,taking off my T-shirt, ripping it , and tieing my foot up to stop the bleeding, as I walked limping back home two miles through woods barefoot in just my bathing suit. We would hike out to this hidden frog pond and catch huge bullfrogs. Crazy..could have been eaten by wolves or bears.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25567776


Now that! That sounds familiar! I had a nail put durn near through my foot, and felt silly about it, and had a similiar experience. We didn't worry about wolves or bears though. Maybe might see a feral pig squealing in the distance or a coyote or fox.

Last Edited by Don'tBeAfraid on 02/01/2013 09:12 AM
INK3

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United States
02/01/2013 09:14 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
I went barefoot all summer. I lived by the ocean, so we went to the beach nearly every day. I also remember having to wear shoes a week before school, because my feet would sort of flatten out in the summer, not to mention the calloused bottoms of my feet.

I played outside all day, only came in for lunch and dinner. It was lovely.
"When tyrants tremble in their fear, and hear their death knell ringing,
When friends rejoice both far and near, how can I keep from singing"

page7
Don'tBeAfraid

User ID: 33440387
United States
02/01/2013 09:15 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Well, try to run barefoot in conrete jungle, see what happens.

You can still run barefoot however or whenever you wish...

It doesn't mean they were brilliant back then, probably were dumber than current gamer children.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 33440136


Really?
Prolly had to take this exam to graduate. Care to try it yourself? Have fun.

EXAMINATION GRADUATION QUESTIONS
OF SALINE COUNTY, KANSAS
April 13, 1895
J.W. Armstrong, County Superintendent.

Examinations at Salina, New Cambria, Gypsum City, Assaria, Falun, Bavaria, and District No. 74 (in Glendale Twp.)

Reading and Penmanship. - The Examination will be oral, and the Penmanship of Applicants will be graded from the manuscripts

Grammar (Time, one hour)

1. Give nine rules for the use of Capital Letters.
2. Name the Parts of Speech and define those that have no modifications.
3. Define Verse, Stanza and Paragraph.
4. What are the Principal Parts of a verb? Give Principal Parts of do, lie, lay and run.
5. Define Case, Illustrate each Case.
6. What is Punctuation? Give rules for principal marks of Punctuation.
7-10. Write a composition of about 150 words and show therein that you understand the practical use of the rules of grammar.

Arithmetic (Time, 1.25 hours)

1. Name and define the Fundamental Rules of Arithmetic.
2. A wagon box is 2 ft. deep, 10 feet long, and 3 ft. wide. How many bushels of wheat will it hold?
3. If a load of wheat weighs 3942 lbs., what is it worth at 50 cts. per bu, deducting 1050 lbs. for tare?
4. District No. 33 has a valuation of $35,000. What is the necessary levy to carry on a school seven months at $50 per month, and have $104 for incidentals?
5. Find cost of 6720 lbs. coal at $6.00 per ton.
6. Find the interest of $512.60 for 8 months and 18 days at 7 percent.
7. What is the cost of 40 boards 12 inches wide and 16 ft. long at $.20 per inch?
8. Find bank discount on $300 for 90 days (no grace) at 10 percent.
9. What is the cost of a square farm at $15 per acre, the distance around which is 640 rods?
10. Write a Bank Check, a Promissory Note, and a Receipt.

U.S. History (Time, 45 minutes)

1. Give the epochs into which U.S. History is divided.
2. Give an account of the discovery of America by Columbus.
3. Relate the causes and results of the Revolutionary War.
4. Show the territorial growth of the United States.
5. Tell what you can of the history of Kansas.
6. Describe three of the most prominent battles of the Rebellion.
7. Who were the following: Morse, Whitney, Fulton, Bell, Lincoln, Penn, and Howe?
8. Name events connected with the following dates: 1607, 1620, 1800, 1849, and 1865?

Orthography (Time, one hour)

1. What is meant by the following: Alphabet, phonetic orthography, etymology, syllabication?
2. What are elementary sounds? How classified?
3. What are the following, and give examples of each: Trigraph, subvocals, diphthong, cognate letters, linguals?
4. Give four substitutes for caret 'u'.
5. Give two rules for spelling words with final 'e'. Name two exceptions under each rule.
6. Give two uses of silent letters in spelling. Illustrate each.
7. Define the following prefixes and use in connection with a word: Bi, dis, mis, pre, semi, post, non, inter, mono, super.
8. Mark diacritically and divide into syllables the following, and name the sign that indicates the sound: Card, ball, mercy, sir, odd, cell, rise, blood, fare, last.
9. Use the following correctly in sentences, Cite, site, sight, fane, fain, feign, vane, vain, vein, raze, raise, rays.
10. Write 10 words frequently mispronounced and indicate pronunciation by use of diacritical marks and by syllabication.

Geography (Time, one hour)

1. What is climate? Upon what does climate depend?
2. How do you account for the extremes of climate in Kansas?
3. Of what use are rivers? Of what use is the ocean?
4. Describe the mountains of N.A.
5. Name and describe the following: Monrovia, Odessa, Denver, Manitoba, Hecla, Yukon, St. Helena, Juan Fernandez, Aspinwall and Orinoco.
6. Name and locate the principal trade centers of the U.S.
7. Name all the republics of Europe and give capital of each.
8. Why is the Atlantic Coast colder than the Pacific in the same latitude?
9. Describe the process by which the water of the ocean returns to the sources of rivers.
10. Describe the movements of the earth. Give inclination of the earth.

Health (Time, 45 minutes)

1. Where are the saliva, gastric juice, and bile secreted? What is the use of each in digestion?
2. How does nutrition reach the circulation?
3. What is the function of the liver? Of the kidneys?
4. How would you stop the flow of blood from an artery in the case of laceration?
5. Give some general directions that you think would be beneficial to preserve the human body in a state of health.

[link to www.barefootsworld.net]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 25676821

Why don't you make an account? If you did, I'd give ya green karma. I daresay few people could pass it, but the questions are sure familiar. It brings back Health class. Did you have to watch the awful drivers ed films where they didn't wear seatbelts and ended up wracked with pain?
Like this:

They were scare tactics to make us wear our seat belts, and were more bloody than any fake zombie films. I feel silly, but we actually watched them through our fingers.

Last Edited by Don'tBeAfraid on 02/01/2013 09:17 AM
Don'tBeAfraid

User ID: 33440387
United States
02/01/2013 09:19 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
I went barefoot all summer. I lived by the ocean, so we went to the beach nearly every day. I also remember having to wear shoes a week before school, because my feet would sort of flatten out in the summer, not to mention the calloused bottoms of my feet.

I played outside all day, only came in for lunch and dinner. It was lovely.
 Quoting: INK3


Me too! We hated the first week because when walked on gravel or hot sand, our feet were so tender! But then not wearing shoes all summer, we'd have no problems walking anywhere.
katballoo

User ID: 33434547
Canada
02/01/2013 09:20 AM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Times changed. Do you wish we all lived like cavemen and hunted for food as well? You can still do those things in the pictures but you choose not to because why?
 Quoting: IceJunkie


That is a very silly question...just think about what you are asking. Why are you being so defensive?

You can't do those things in the pictures anymore, period. Unless, of course, you want your children to get some disease from the ground, or you want some pervert to carry your child away. And the many other things that I don't have to time to mention. Times for children were better back then, that is for sure.
 Quoting: katballoo


I disagree. We can make the world more innocent, especially people who decide to raise their own food. Yes, you can chose to live in those urban areas, or you can live in a rural place like me where mostly things are safer. Child abuse happens everywhere. So do horrific things like the abuse of women. You can live in that world, or you can pull away from it and reject all of the problems of urbanization.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


I live in the country, which I love, but, of course, at my age, I have a choice. Children, do not have a choice. Unfortunately, if all the people from the urban areas chose to live rural, then there really wouldn't be rural areas anymore. LOL The area we moved to 12 years ago, has really grown. We are on 50 acres, but the surrounding areas around us are becoming more "citified" all the time.
duFontaine.

User ID: 29412599
United States
02/01/2013 09:22 AM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
You forgot the most powerful destructive force that brought the United States to where it is today:

POLITICAL CORRECTNESS

Did not exist back then.

People spoke their minds and called what they saw.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 33347026




You sir are correct.

Plus the parents taught the sons to be men from a very early age. If a child didn't have his wits about him by about 12, then he was a disgrace and left to be tended to by his momma.
"Accept now that all you have seen from the day of your birth on the surface of the earth, to the present, are wonderful only because the finite mind of man is confused with fragments of evidence, that, from whatever direction we meet them, spring from an unreachable infinity."
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 09:22 AM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
We'll be back to this, shortly:

[link to www.dailymail.co.uk]

It is a window into the squalor, deprivation and poverty of a bygone age.


This city of sweat shops, shanty towns and slums is an unrecognisable New York, captured, in black and white, as the 19th century wound to a close.

Newly arrived immigrants slept 12 to a room, while street children roamed the alleys and tenement blocks of a Third World downtown Manhattan

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