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Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes

 
Don'tBeAfraid

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02/01/2013 12:43 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
As soon as these barbarian children die out, then we'll stop seeing these things. Currently they're having an emotional effect on the journalists writing these articles. Therefore we have these articles making it seem as if this was a glorious time. "The simplest of pleasures".... This is simply a state of mind. To these children these "pleasures" seem as simple, or as "difficult" (whatever that could mean), as the use of the newest electronic seems to a young boy today. In about a century you'll see articles saying the same thing about the children born in the late 90's and early 00's. I love how emotional everyone becomes when an article like this gets passed around. Give me a break.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 23004989


To clarify, it will take many decades, though with the progression of technology this could be only years, for this same "barbarian" child to reach the age where they feel writing these new articles about how "the simplest of pleasures" between 2000 and, say, 2020+- were. These people must reach a certain age before we'll see the same thing repeated again. It will come with every time span of progression, from now until the end of time.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 23004989


There is great truth here within your words, for all wax poetic when under the influence of nostalgia. Memory is often very selective, and I'd be remiss to say that all was well back then. We were more innocent, and today's generation is sadly not. They are jaded beyond belief, and I am not optimistic for their future. They may not pen such memoires. They may not in fact survive that long. The capacity for self-destruction is potent within their souls. And the souls of them are often almost whisps.

Last Edited by Don'tBeAfraid on 02/01/2013 12:45 PM
texmich

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Im surprised none of yall have told me how yall were there when the declaration of independence was signed and had ice cream afterwards in the green grass with ben franklin or how you went fishing with lincoln. sheesh lol popcorn
Don'tBeAfraid

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02/01/2013 12:47 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Beautiful post! Thank you for letting me momentarily relive my childhood through your words. I feel sorry for the kids growing up in this crazy world we live in today.

I remember my mother hanging the laundry in the yard while talking over the fence to a neighbor. If a woman was sick or just delivered a baby, neighbors would cook for the family until the Mom got back on her feet. Doctors made house calls. If you needed information you went to the library and looked it up. People wrote letters and penmanship was important. We respected our elders and listened to their stories and learned history from them. I sure miss the good old days!

hf
 Quoting: CowgirlK


I did not have an idealic childhood and I grew up in the 50-60's. There was still war, bad marriages(w/o divorce because women were stuck), incest, pedophilia, corruption and hardship of all kinds. You must look back through American history and you will see it all. This is the point I am trying to make. If we are the products of idealic childhoods then why is this country so F**ked, why is there so much unhappiness and why do we continue to degenerate? I believe it is because we live in DENIAL of true reality. We go through life comatose and lie to one another.

We have always been in denial as a species and that is why we are where we are at today. And we refuse to THINK for ourselves.
 Quoting: duncog2012

What you claim as "denial" I say is wholesale projection onto the rest of us. It's a warped view of reality. I'm sorry that it happened to you, but it's not a healthy assessment or a valid one.
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 12:47 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Im surprised none of yall have told me how yall were there when the declaration of independence was signed and had ice cream afterwards in the green grass with ben franklin or how you went fishing with lincoln. sheesh lol popcorn
 Quoting: texmich


Dolly Madison is the one who introduced the country to ice cream, don't ya know?
Don'tBeAfraid

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02/01/2013 12:48 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Im surprised none of yall have told me how yall were there when the declaration of independence was signed and had ice cream afterwards in the green grass with ben franklin or how you went fishing with lincoln. sheesh lol popcorn
 Quoting: texmich


"When I was young, we had it rough! We had to get up a half an hour before we went to bed. But if you tell young people that, they won't believe ya!" Monty Python
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 12:53 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Before plastic, microwave frequencies, pc's


The electronic age has a hidden, deadly side. The electrostatic field is mutating us.
 Quoting: --Voltaic--


care to elaborate?
duncog2012

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02/01/2013 12:53 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Beautiful post! Thank you for letting me momentarily relive my childhood through your words. I feel sorry for the kids growing up in this crazy world we live in today.

I remember my mother hanging the laundry in the yard while talking over the fence to a neighbor. If a woman was sick or just delivered a baby, neighbors would cook for the family until the Mom got back on her feet. Doctors made house calls. If you needed information you went to the library and looked it up. People wrote letters and penmanship was important. We respected our elders and listened to their stories and learned history from them. I sure miss the good old days!

hf
 Quoting: CowgirlK


I did not have an idealic childhood and I grew up in the 50-60's. There was still war, bad marriages(w/o divorce because women were stuck), incest, pedophilia, corruption and hardship of all kinds. You must look back through American history and you will see it all. This is the point I am trying to make. If we are the products of idealic childhoods then why is this country so F**ked, why is there so much unhappiness and why do we continue to degenerate? I believe it is because we live in DENIAL of true reality. We go through life comatose and lie to one another.

We have always been in denial as a species and that is why we are where we are at today. And we refuse to THINK for ourselves.
 Quoting: duncog2012

What you claim as "denial" I say is wholesale projection onto the rest of us. It's a warped view of reality. I'm sorry that it happened to you, but it's not a healthy assessment or a valid one.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Then tell me how most of this country fell under the spell of the 911 illusion that resulted in the disaster in the middle east? Is there anything more damaging to the human psyche than war? I know it does not effect you, right? Wrong it effects all of us because we are all connected.

Last Edited by duncog2012 on 02/01/2013 01:03 PM
duncog2012
Don'tBeAfraid

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02/01/2013 12:57 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Beautiful post! Thank you for letting me momentarily relive my childhood through your words. I feel sorry for the kids growing up in this crazy world we live in today.

I remember my mother hanging the laundry in the yard while talking over the fence to a neighbor. If a woman was sick or just delivered a baby, neighbors would cook for the family until the Mom got back on her feet. Doctors made house calls. If you needed information you went to the library and looked it up. People wrote letters and penmanship was important. We respected our elders and listened to their stories and learned history from them. I sure miss the good old days!

hf
 Quoting: CowgirlK


What a sweetheart you are, so lovely inside. I have often by charmed by your words. And what you wrote immediately brought to mind a hundred wonderful memories of helping my mom hang up fresh sheets billowing in the early Summer and the dance of cabbage moths and bright yellow goldenrod, and silly nosey neighbors who made us brownies and redeemed themselves. All of that cascades from rich experiences that I'll always treasure.

Last Edited by Don'tBeAfraid on 02/01/2013 12:58 PM
Butt Pincher

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
How about that last picture.. That's no milf carrying those jugs.. If that's the mom, she has seen a hard life..
Don'tBeAfraid

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Then tell me how most of this country fell under the spell of the 911 illusion that resulted in the disaster in the middle east?
 Quoting: duncog2012


As my great-grandfather so often said, "Son, what the Hell does that have to do with the price of tea in China?" Talk about a non sequitur, what pray tell does innocent memories of childhood have to do with "the spell of the 911 illusion"?

I think you're talk about self-delusion here, but I'm grasping at straws...

Last Edited by Don'tBeAfraid on 02/01/2013 01:02 PM
texmich

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
How about that last picture.. That's no milf carrying those jugs.. If that's the mom, she has seen a hard life..
 Quoting: Butt Pincher


lmao, yall can have those old cows, give me kate upton any day
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 01:10 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
You forgot the most powerful destructive force that brought the United States to where it is today:

POLITICAL CORRECTNESS

Did not exist back then.

People spoke their minds and called what they saw.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 33347026


do that now, you get banned, thus silenced
duncog2012

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02/01/2013 01:11 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Then tell me how most of this country fell under the spell of the 911 illusion that resulted in the disaster in the middle east?
 Quoting: duncog2012


As my great-grandfather so often said, "Son, what the Hell does that have to do with the price of tea in China?" Talk about a non sequitur, what pray tell does innocent memories of childhood have to do with "the spell of the 911 illusion"?

I think you're talk about self-delusion here, but I'm grasping at straws...
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


I am glad you had a happy childhood. But I think the majority of people believe we are heading in the wrong direction as a society. I agree happiness comes from w/in. But I happen to feel like I am on the TITANIC headed for the ICEBERG and most people arranging the deck chairs.

I get it we have to live one day at a time. But TSHTF in the near future and when it does it will be a very interesting day indeed. Peace brother!

Last Edited by duncog2012 on 02/01/2013 01:12 PM
duncog2012
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
those were beautiful pictures! thanks for sharing this! It is neat to see old pictures colorized it feels like you can step back in time.

You know the Amish kids picture, they didnt look much different then they do today. I wonder if they are as happy as children today as they were back then.

five stars for a wonderful thread!
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02/01/2013 01:13 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Then don't buy them game consoles.
The problem here is that parents no longer act like parents but "friends" of their kids.
It is okay to be there as a friend for your kids but you need to make sure they still follow your rules while they stay under your roof.
The moment you let your kids grow up like Bart Simpson, then you'll have a bigger problem in your hands.
Limit their xbox time, do not be afraid of your children, you are their boss while they still live under your care. Just make sure you do not do anything physical to them, I know corporal punishment is now illegal in your country.
*HAARP Lady*

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02/01/2013 01:15 PM

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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Beautiful post! Thank you for letting me momentarily relive my childhood through your words. I feel sorry for the kids growing up in this crazy world we live in today.

I remember my mother hanging the laundry in the yard while talking over the fence to a neighbor. If a woman was sick or just delivered a baby, neighbors would cook for the family until the Mom got back on her feet. Doctors made house calls. If you needed information you went to the library and looked it up. People wrote letters and penmanship was important. We respected our elders and listened to their stories and learned history from them. I sure miss the good old days!

hf
 Quoting: CowgirlK


I did not have an idealic childhood and I grew up in the 50-60's. There was still war, bad marriages(w/o divorce because women were stuck), incest, pedophilia, corruption and hardship of all kinds. You must look back through American history and you will see it all. This is the point I am trying to make. If we are the products of idealic childhoods then why is this country so F**ked, why is there so much unhappiness and why do we continue to degenerate? I believe it is because we live in DENIAL of true reality. We go through life comatose and lie to one another.

We have always been in denial as a species and that is why we are where we are at today. And we refuse to THINK for ourselves.
 Quoting: duncog2012

What you claim as "denial" I say is wholesale projection onto the rest of us. It's a warped view of reality. I'm sorry that it happened to you, but it's not a healthy assessment or a valid one.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


^^^^^^^THIS^^^^^^^^^^^^

clappa
Don't get mad - Get a Pepsi!
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02/01/2013 01:19 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
i blame the moronic parents for allowing their kids to become like robots and act like them too.
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
I love pictures like these. But what an annoying and disappointing post by the OP. Idiots longing for the image in their head of the good all the days when life on earth was like being in heaven.
IvantZtrooth

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02/01/2013 01:20 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
communities/neighborhoods should be waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more involved with each other. this seperation will turn us into computers.
Don'tBeAfraid

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02/01/2013 01:21 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Then tell me how most of this country fell under the spell of the 911 illusion that resulted in the disaster in the middle east?
 Quoting: duncog2012


As my great-grandfather so often said, "Son, what the Hell does that have to do with the price of tea in China?" Talk about a non sequitur, what pray tell does innocent memories of childhood have to do with "the spell of the 911 illusion"?

I think you're talk about self-delusion here, but I'm grasping at straws...
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


I am glad you had a happy childhood. But I think the majority of people believe we are heading in the wrong direction as a society. I agree happiness comes from w/in. But I happen to feel like I am on the TITANIC headed for the ICEBERG and most people arranging the deck chairs.

I get it we have to live one day at a time. But TSHTF in the near future and when it does it will be a very interesting day indeed. Peace brother!
 Quoting: duncog2012


Then you should read my topic in my sig on prepping and getting close to the Earth and God. Even if you don't believe in God, 90% is not spiritual but practical things you can do to grow food, or make fire or build a refrigerator or find Soldier's Herb for healin' or finding inner peace or any number of pragmatic ways to find some balance.

Even if your childhood was awful, then today is a chance for a new beginning. I believe the collapse will come soon, and those who learn skills now, they have the best chances to survive. It may all suck and be unpleasant, but if we have skills, then maybe we can save one child before we die. That would make our lives have meaning.
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 01:25 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Photo said this was prolly taken in Canada...but notice how clean their hair is!
 Quoting: Harper77


Clean water with natural minerals makes for shiny hair and healthy skin. No chemicals in the water supply in those days. Most people had well water on their property. Well water is full of healthy minerals.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 24392638


and run-off and sewage, chemicals and and and
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 01:27 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Not only healthy.

See these kids are happy and love each other.

See the little boy with his arm around the girl next to him?

Just think, this was all before......
Separation of church from state
Welfare
Abortion
Gay rights

Care to add to this list?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 32715303


There's a lot of truth in your statement.

During this time frame there also wasn't rampant crimes, gangs on every street, multi-cultural bullshit, and the liberal/progressive/communist ideals that are shoved down everyone's throat these days

"Social Progress" has royally fucked up society

 Quoting: Nemamiah


Of course it has. that's how it's been planned and engineered.

Everyone must realise that life WAS closer to being pure in the past, and has been degrading towards chaotic insanity since, as was foretold.
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 01:29 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
These fascinating pictures of American and Canadian youngsters in the first half of the 20th century capture an almost forgotten age of innocence and the simplest of pleasures.

The photographs, from the archives of the National Geographic magazine, show children from around two or three up until their early teens and give a fascinating glimpse into what life was like for youngsters without the all trappings of the modern world which we now take so much for granted.

[link to www.dailymail.co.uk]

These are clearly poor kids, but see how healthy they look! Such is progress.
 Quoting: Tess2012


I'd like to add - back in the 70's

1. we never locked our house door or car!
2. Everyone respected everyone else's rights -
3. Crime then wasn't even as bad
4. There was respect at school and to adults
5. No computers or video games - just imagination and playing outside!
6. We ate what was on our plate and didn't waste!

Time was so much SIMPLER then! This is just within the last 50 years! What happened?

sad
 Quoting: *HAARP Lady*


and a lot more than just flesh
texmich

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02/01/2013 01:29 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
These fascinating pictures of American and Canadian youngsters in the first half of the 20th century capture an almost forgotten age of innocence and the simplest of pleasures.

The photographs, from the archives of the National Geographic magazine, show children from around two or three up until their early teens and give a fascinating glimpse into what life was like for youngsters without the all trappings of the modern world which we now take so much for granted.

[link to www.dailymail.co.uk]

These are clearly poor kids, but see how healthy they look! Such is progress.
 Quoting: Tess2012


Whoa at the bottom of that link it says teacher puts sexy pics on her twitter, now tell me you would want to live back to the old days. I wish i had a teacher like that, she could tutor me after school too

Last Edited by texmich on 02/01/2013 01:31 PM
texmich

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02/01/2013 01:29 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Im surprised none of yall have told me how yall were there when the declaration of independence was signed and had ice cream afterwards in the green grass with ben franklin or how you went fishing with lincoln. sheesh lol popcorn
 Quoting: texmich


Dolly Madison is the one who introduced the country to ice cream, don't ya know?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 31862440


Whos that chic? thought it was like blue bell or haagan daz
Adamic Seed nli
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02/01/2013 01:30 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
chlld abuse
paedophile priests
wife abuse
witch hunts and lynching
and escuse me, the church has always been seperated from the state, no?

Not only healthy.

See these kids are happy and love each other.

See the little boy with his arm around the girl next to him?

Just think, this was all before......
Separation of church from state
Welfare
Abortion
Gay rights

Care to add to this list?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 32715303
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 01:36 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Misegnation motherfuckers. Aint it grand?
 Quoting: jack of all trades


I think you mean miscegenation, my obtuse racist colleague.

And no, I don't concur to your assessment.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


"We must realize that our party's most powerful weapon is racial tension. By propounding into the consciousness of the dark races, that for centuries they have been oppressed by the whites, we can move them to the program of the communist party. In America, we will aim for subtle victory. While inflaming the Negro minority against the whites, we will instill in the whites a guilt-complex for their exploitation of the Negroes. We will aid the Negroes to rise to prominence in every walk of life, in the professions, and in the world of sports and entertainment. With this prestige, the Negro will be able to intermarry with the whites and begin a process which will deliver America to our cause."
 Quoting: jack of all trades


Don't you have an original ideas of your own? Will you really rely upon the words of others to speak for you? To offer evidence is one thing, but to be lacking in any capacity for eloquence, that means you are doomed to be silent and ultimately ignored.
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


some do offer up their "original ideas of your own", but when they do they often get banned or psychologically beaten to a slimy, pulpy blubber of silence.
Anonymous Coward
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02/01/2013 01:40 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Beautiful post! Thank you for letting me momentarily relive my childhood through your words. I feel sorry for the kids growing up in this crazy world we live in today.

I remember my mother hanging the laundry in the yard while talking over the fence to a neighbor. If a woman was sick or just delivered a baby, neighbors would cook for the family until the Mom got back on her feet. Doctors made house calls. If you needed information you went to the library and looked it up. People wrote letters and penmanship was important. We respected our elders and listened to their stories and learned history from them. I sure miss the good old days!

hf
 Quoting: CowgirlK


I did not have an idealic childhood and I grew up in the 50-60's. There was still war, bad marriages(w/o divorce because women were stuck), incest, pedophilia, corruption and hardship of all kinds. You must look back through American history and you will see it all. This is the point I am trying to make. If we are the products of idealic childhoods then why is this country so F**ked, why is there so much unhappiness and addictions of all kinds and why do we continue to degenerate? I believe it is because we live in DENIAL of true reality. We go through life comatose and lie to one another.

We have always been in denial as a species and that is why we are where we are at today. And we refuse to THINK for ourselves.
 Quoting: duncog2012




Life was not idyllic, but the human failures were not so rampant then. People hid their failings, obsenities, and promiscuities more back then. Now evil people are arrogant about their ugliness; then, they tried to keep it secret, and so it did not spill over as much onto the innocents as it does now. Generally, life was far more innocent then, and those who were into sin did not relish it so much...there was a shame about it and people wanted to appear respectable. Hypocritic? Yes, but at least there was not all the harm done by it when they tried to hide it. They did not affect others so much as they do today. Now evil and sinfulness and hurtfulness are "in your face" and they think it's cool. Not!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 33416401
Germany
02/01/2013 01:42 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
Not only healthy.

See these kids are happy and love each other.

See the little boy with his arm around the girl next to him?

Just think, this was all before......
Separation of church from state
Welfare
Abortion
Gay rights

Care to add to this list?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 32715303


I'll add to this.

It has fuck all to do with any of the things you mentioned.

What a skewered look on life you have!

It has everything to do with corporations taking over the world and forcing greed and consumerism down everyones throats for the past 50 years.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 22896601


^^^This.
texmich

User ID: 11346886
United States
02/01/2013 01:47 PM
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Re: Pictures of America's youth in the early 20th century when children ran barefott instead of playing X boxes
OP, a lot of people won't get it. Back then, we felt safe. I could walk anywhere in my town and need never worry, even the poorest African-American section of town at 6 years old, and not be hassled. I used to walk to the grocery store to get bread and milk and not once did anyone bother me. In fact people waved and were kind to me.

Contrast that with now. I'd never let a child walk through there. They'd see all kinds of crime even in my small town: prostitution, drugs, thugs, wannabee gansters. It's pathetic.

Were there problems? No doubt, but children still had their innocence. No porn available 24/7 on a computer. Only on rare occasions would we laugh by looking through the lingerie section of the Sears catalogue! That was our innocent fun.

We rode our bikes all over town. Many of us had paper routes and made enough money to buy our ice cream, comic books, some clothes, our bikes, go see a movie once a week at the matinee, sometimes staying through to watch at least two for the same price. We paid for the presents we gave to our family, and felt a sense of pride at earning money to benefit others. We saved our money each day during Lent and gave money to missions to help the poor.

I can remember a kid fell on the sidewalk. He lived many blocks away. My mom cleaned his wounds, bandaged him up in our home. Fed him lunch, and sent him on his way. There's no way a parent would risk doing all that now. They'd simply call his parents and have them pick him up.

We hiked in the woods and built dams in the streams. Fashioned boats out wood and home sails. We didn't have that many toys, mostly made due with homemade bow and arrows and bola and pretended to be Native American warriors.

We played tetherball, volleyball, kickball, basketball. We ran everywhere and we were lean and tan and wiry and healthy. Maybe one child was a little overweight but we didn't tease him, and likely he'd work off most of the weight during the summer.

No one took vitamins because we ate better even though poor. Almost every meal was homemade save an occasional lunch of Campbell's soup. Mom's were embarrassed if they made a "box cake", and the other mom's would tease them. Almost every meal did my family sit together at once and eat and talk and share stories.

We never missed church. We were there every Wednesday and Sunday, and always went to youth group because we wanted to.

Seldom were any kids overscheduled. We had plenty of time for school and homework, and maybe took one activity like playing the piano or one sport.

I know this seems silly to some young people, but I feel sad for them. They were and are in such a rush to grow up. We were different back then. Holding hands was a BIG DEAL. The first kisses were special and innocent and there was so much importance about who you shared that with. Few couples risked making love and going all the way, and seldom were there teen moms and always they got married, and there was little judgement because "they were in love so it was natural...".

We were kinder to each other. We worked hard to elimate people using the N word. We considered anyone who said it "low class fools". Years later when folks started calling themselves that, I was shocked.

I can remember what a big deal it was when a person of another race came over. How shy each of us was in each other's homes and so respectful for the opportunity to share a meal and learn and be more understanding. Now we thump our chests and are all puffed up. It's stupid. Back then, I actually thought that racism would die in my generation. How foolishly naive I was. People love it too much.

I remember the first Jewish boy I met at age nine. I learned the Shema from him. His parents were good hard working people. They weren't any different than my parents, both sets working to make their children's lives better and easier.

Even when someone was realy different, we were excited by it, and wanted to learn why they were. We might have become good friends and teased them, but didn't despise them for living a different way.

Some old guys lived together, we called them "confirmed bachelors", but everyone knew they were "funny" but most didn't tease them or hate them for it. We just shrugged our shoulders and didn't make a big deal. I think I was 17 before I heard the term f...t, and I was shocked people would say that word. It meant something burning. My friends never said. My parents never did.Not once did anyone in church condemn it, we talked about redemption and Jesus and didn't espouse hate there.

There weren't any homeless, save an occasional drunk, that always found some money tucked into his pocket by a mom or dad, or made him a meal or even invited him to the supper table.

Our dads all served as soldiers, and even when they came home, and we saw that far off sad look, we respected them for their service, and wished them success and happiness. They were heroes to a boy, no matter how they served in whatever capacity.

We adored our moms. They were gentle and yet tough. We seldom raised our voices in the house, and never yelled at them. It was just unheard of to talk back. We always told them they looked beautiful, especially on Sunday because they wore their best and looked radiant. We wanted to meet girls like them. They never ever did anything lewd or used a curse word save if they dropped a casserole on the kitchen floor, and then it was likely, "Shoot!".
 Quoting: Don'tBeAfraid


Sheesh who needs ambien or lunesta, just read this and its lights out. Its like your great great great grandfather telling you a story about his grandfathers stories his grandfather told him!! Zzzzzzzzzzz dead

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