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The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background

 
Person445
The West Coast Truth

User ID: 11438968
Canada
02/02/2013 09:48 AM

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The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
Currently the ongoing situation in Mali is gaining traction in the media with the reporting of Al Qaeda members within the ranks of the Tuareg rebels. The situation in quite complicated and involves not only France, but also the US and partially Canada and links to the interests of these Western powers with not just Mali, but with the African continent as a whole. However, in order to get a better handle on the situation, there must first be an understanding of the domestic actors, namely the Tuareg people.

The Tuareg People

In order to get a better handle on the situation, there must first be an understanding of the domestic actors, namely the Tuareg people.

The Tuareg are a people that have lived in northern Mali “as early as the fifth century BCE” [1] according to Herodotus. After establishing the city of Timbuktu in the 11th century, the Tuareg “traded, traveled, and conquered throughout Saharan” over the next four centuries, eventually converting to Islam in the 14th century, which allowed them to “gained great wealth trading salt, gold, and black slaves.” [2] This independence was swept away when the French colonized Mali when they “defeated the Tuareg at Timbuktu and established borders and administrative districts to rule the area until Mali declared independence in 1960." [3] The Tuareg people have consistently wanted self-independence and in pursuit of such goals have engaged in a number of rebellions.

The first was in 1916 when, in response to the French not giving the Tuareg their own autonomous zone (called Azawad) as was promised, they revolted. The French violently quelled the revolt and “subsequently confiscated important grazing lands while using Tuaregs as forced conscripts and labor - and fragmented Tuareg societies through the drawing of arbitrary boundaries between Soudan (Mali) and its neighbors.”[4] Yet, this did not end the Tuareg goal of an independent, sovereign state. Once the French had ceded Mali independence, the Tuareg began to push toward their dream of establishing Azawad once again with “several prominent Tuareg leaders [lobbying] for a separate Tuareg homeland consisting of northern Mali and parts of modern day Algeria, Niger, Mauritania. […] [However,] black politicians like Modibo Keita, Mali’s first President, made it clear that independent Mali would not cede its northern territories." [5]

Con't @ [link to whataboutpeace.blogspot.ca]
icyman61

User ID: 33148375
United States
02/02/2013 09:54 AM

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Re: The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
Currently the ongoing situation in Mali is gaining traction in the media with the reporting of Al Qaeda members within the ranks of the Tuareg rebels. The situation in quite complicated and involves not only France, but also the US and partially Canada and links to the interests of these Western powers with not just Mali, but with the African continent as a whole. However, in order to get a better handle on the situation, there must first be an understanding of the domestic actors, namely the Tuareg people.

The Tuareg People

In order to get a better handle on the situation, there must first be an understanding of the domestic actors, namely the Tuareg people.

The Tuareg are a people that have lived in northern Mali “as early as the fifth century BCE” [1] according to Herodotus. After establishing the city of Timbuktu in the 11th century, the Tuareg “traded, traveled, and conquered throughout Saharan” over the next four centuries, eventually converting to Islam in the 14th century, which allowed them to “gained great wealth trading salt, gold, and black slaves.” [2] This independence was swept away when the French colonized Mali when they “defeated the Tuareg at Timbuktu and established borders and administrative districts to rule the area until Mali declared independence in 1960." [3] The Tuareg people have consistently wanted self-independence and in pursuit of such goals have engaged in a number of rebellions.

The first was in 1916 when, in response to the French not giving the Tuareg their own autonomous zone (called Azawad) as was promised, they revolted. The French violently quelled the revolt and “subsequently confiscated important grazing lands while using Tuaregs as forced conscripts and labor - and fragmented Tuareg societies through the drawing of arbitrary boundaries between Soudan (Mali) and its neighbors.”[4] Yet, this did not end the Tuareg goal of an independent, sovereign state. Once the French had ceded Mali independence, the Tuareg began to push toward their dream of establishing Azawad once again with “several prominent Tuareg leaders [lobbying] for a separate Tuareg homeland consisting of northern Mali and parts of modern day Algeria, Niger, Mauritania. […] [However,] black politicians like Modibo Keita, Mali’s first President, made it clear that independent Mali would not cede its northern territories." [5]

Con't @ [link to whataboutpeace.blogspot.ca]
 Quoting: Person445


OP I gave ya a 5 star for some of the info but arent you forgetting a major proponent for "MAYBE" why everyone is attacking Mali?

GOLD?
icyman61

User ID: 33148375
United States
02/02/2013 10:10 AM

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Re: The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
i understand that you didnt write it, but why didnt you mention the fact that Mali produces more than 50 tons of Gold each year.

It is only beat by two other countries. Yet in Mali you can often buy several grams of Gold for far less than it is worth from the small scale miners there who live in poverty. Example 7 grams for 30 US dollars when market price is around 67 dollars a gram.

The powers that be dont want rebels interfering with their "FRIENDS" getting gold out.

Just my opinion though.
Person445 (OP)
The West Coast Truth

User ID: 11438968
Canada
02/02/2013 10:17 AM

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Re: The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
i understand that you didnt write it, but why didnt you mention the fact that Mali produces more than 50 tons of Gold each year.

It is only beat by two other countries. Yet in Mali you can often buy several grams of Gold for far less than it is worth from the small scale miners there who live in poverty. Example 7 grams for 30 US dollars when market price is around 67 dollars a gram.

The powers that be dont want rebels interfering with their "FRIENDS" getting gold out.

Just my opinion though.
 Quoting: icyman61


As I know the author, I will bring him into the thread to answer your question.

Give me like 3 mins.
Mr. Invisible

User ID: 33511331
United States
02/02/2013 10:20 AM

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Re: The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
i understand that you didnt write it, but why didnt you mention the fact that Mali produces more than 50 tons of Gold each year.

It is only beat by two other countries. Yet in Mali you can often buy several grams of Gold for far less than it is worth from the small scale miners there who live in poverty. Example 7 grams for 30 US dollars when market price is around 67 dollars a gram.

The powers that be dont want rebels interfering with their "FRIENDS" getting gold out.

Just my opinion though.
 Quoting: icyman61



This was just a historical background about the Tuareg people. I am currently working on an article that will very much talk about the reasons that Mali is currently being attacked.
"So I wait for you like a lonely house. Till you will see me again and live in me. Till then my windows ache."
~ Pablo Neruda
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 29495491
United States
02/02/2013 10:52 AM
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Re: The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
there is no crisis in Mali.

that was last year. now its over.

perhaps one year from now you'll start a thread talking about the miracle in Mali.

everyone on this site is behind...a year is not as bad as you may think...don't be too depressed for being so far behind.
icyman61

User ID: 33148375
United States
02/02/2013 11:54 AM

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Re: The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
there is no crisis in Mali.

that was last year. now its over.

perhaps one year from now you'll start a thread talking about the miracle in Mali.

everyone on this site is behind...a year is not as bad as you may think...don't be too depressed for being so far behind.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 29495491


Being attacked by French, US, and others no crisis?

I guess you have never been in a combat zone!
NSF001

User ID: 33263448
United Kingdom
02/02/2013 11:58 AM
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Re: The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
there is no crisis in Mali.

that was last year. now its over.

perhaps one year from now you'll start a thread talking about the miracle in Mali.

everyone on this site is behind...a year is not as bad as you may think...don't be too depressed for being so far behind.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 29495491


Being attacked by French, US, and others no crisis?

I guess you have never been in a combat zone!
 Quoting: icyman61


They are not being attacked, the Malian government ASKED for international assistance removing the rats that had set up shop in the country mand were enforcing brutal islamic law on everyone.
I don't think so,
he's up there with the others laying low,
vying with those who you've traded your life to to bless your soul,
icyman61

User ID: 8618196
United States
02/03/2013 12:02 AM

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Re: The Crisis in Mali: A Historical Background
there is no crisis in Mali.

that was last year. now its over.

perhaps one year from now you'll start a thread talking about the miracle in Mali.

everyone on this site is behind...a year is not as bad as you may think...don't be too depressed for being so far behind.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 29495491


Being attacked by French, US, and others no crisis?

I guess you have never been in a combat zone!
 Quoting: icyman61


They are not being attacked, the Malian government ASKED for international assistance removing the rats that had set up shop in the country mand were enforcing brutal islamic law on everyone.
 Quoting: NSF001


Sure, and I guess Argentina asked for help liberating the Falkland Islands from those nasty guys too? What LUCK its loaded with oil and now Britian gets all the oil!!

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