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Hey wait a second... If United States didn't exist before 1776...

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1556732
United States
02/23/2013 01:11 PM
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Hey wait a second... If United States didn't exist before 1776...
Why is there a Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ruling dating back to 1759?

The Lessee of Hyam and others v. Edwards
[link to supreme.justia.com]

I realize that technically the Constitution wasn't ratified until 1787 and that may be the true date of creation for the United States (federal government). However, it still doesn't explain a Supreme Court existing before that date.

Is the Supreme Court a separate entity all-together?

In numerous rulings and opinion's, the Supreme Court likes to identify itself as the Court, and the federal government as the Government - suggesting it being an entirely different entity.

In 1762, the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania mentioned it's first opinion of the need for a Constitution.

The King v. John Lukens
[link to supreme.justia.com]

Who are these guys? Are they an extension of England? Is the history of the United States not necessarily what most people think? Or is this just insignificant?
RockHall

User ID: 33955437
United States
02/23/2013 01:15 PM
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Re: Hey wait a second... If United States didn't exist before 1776...
Why is there a Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ruling dating back to 1759?

The Lessee of Hyam and others v. Edwards
[link to supreme.justia.com]

I realize that technically the Constitution wasn't ratified until 1787 and that may be the true date of creation for the United States (federal government). However, it still doesn't explain a Supreme Court existing before that date.

Is the Supreme Court a separate entity all-together?

In numerous rulings and opinion's, the Supreme Court likes to identify itself as the Court, and the federal government as the Government - suggesting it being an entirely different entity.

In 1762, the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania mentioned it's first opinion of the need for a Constitution.

The King v. John Lukens
[link to supreme.justia.com]

Who are these guys? Are they an extension of England? Is the history of the United States not necessarily what most people think? Or is this just insignificant?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1556732


As I understand it, there were 13 colonies that were under a limited self-rule charter from England. So you can claim that, in their own right, they were "states." The states then became united on September 1, 1789 with the signing of the U.S. Constitution.
"I think, therefore I am..."
René Descartes

"I don't think, therefore I am not..."
RockHall
Widespread Panic

User ID: 18373227
United States
02/23/2013 01:16 PM
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Re: Hey wait a second... If United States didn't exist before 1776...
Wow, really?

Keep reading, you might learn something.

Here is a hint. Before they were called "States", they were called "Colonies", but they were still united, more or less.
"Big wooly mammoth gonna wear my coat in the middle of the summertime"
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 1556732
United States
02/23/2013 01:16 PM
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Re: Hey wait a second... If United States didn't exist before 1776...
In 1762, the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania mentioned it's first opinion of the need for a Constitution.

The King v. John Lukens
[link to supreme.justia.com]

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1556732


I apologize, I read "Construction" as "Constitution." It's early for me.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 1556732
United States
02/23/2013 01:19 PM
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Re: Hey wait a second... If United States didn't exist before 1776...
Wow, really?

Keep reading, you might learn something.

Here is a hint. Before they were called "States", they were called "Colonies", but they were still united, more or less.
 Quoting: Widespread Panic


Yes, I realize that they were colonies.

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