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Credo Mutwa & the Alien Agenda: UFOs & Alien Abduction in the Eyes of a Zulu Shaman

 
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Credo Mutwa & the Alien Agenda: UFOs & Alien Abduction in the Eyes of a Zulu Shaman
Credo Mutwa & the Alien Agenda: UFOs & Alien Abduction in the Eyes of a Zulu Shaman

March 16, 2013 By davidjones
By LOUIS PROUD—

The Zulu sangoma (a shaman or healer) and high sanusi (clairvoyant and lore-master) Vusamazulu Credo Mutwa is recognised by many as one of the most distinguished African traditional healers around today. He is, in fact, the spiritual leader of the sanusis and sangomas of South Africa.

As well as being a successful artist, author and historian, Mutwa is also an outspoken victim of alien abduction, having allegedly been in contact by entities his people call the mantindane (‘the tormentors’), which are similar in nature to what we in the English speaking world call ‘the grays’. Stories of UFOs and alien beings make up a big part of African tribal culture, he says.

Awakener of the Zulus

Mutwa was born on July 21, 1921 in the South African province of Natal. The name Vusamazulu means ‘awakener of the Zulus’, and was appointed to Mutwa during his initiation as a sangoma. Mutwa means ‘little bush man’, and Credo means ‘I believe’. Born out of wedlock, Mutwa was considered “an illegitimate child, a child of shame.” Because his mother, who was descended from a long line of medicine men and women, refused to convert to Christianity, Mutwa’s parents separated shortly after his birth. Thus he was primarily raised by his Roman Catholic father, who frequently travelled from place to place, working as a builder.

Mutwa claims that much of the knowledge he now possesses – of art, science, medicine, engineering and so on – can be attributed to the fact that, when he was child, he was taught by “strange companions.” These “little people,” he says, some of whom were blue in colour, used to make their presence known to other children as well. In fact, “all African children used to see such things.” Thanks to the help of these beings, he says, he was often more knowledgeable than some of his teachers at school.

When, in 1937, Mutwa was brutally raped by a gang of mineworkers outside a mine compound, he experienced “a great shock and trauma,” remaining ill for a very long time. He developed a feverish condition, accompanied by nightmares and visions, which caused great pain and debilitation, and which, he says, almost killed him. It also caused him to become highly psychic, and he was sometimes able to read the minds of those around him, as well as perceive auras. The treatment he received from European doctors and Christian faith healers didn’t help at all.

Shortly afterwards, Mutwa was brought to his mother’s village in Zululand, where his grandfather, Ziko Shezi, a sangoma and warrior – “whom my father despised as a heathen and a demon worshipper” – brought him back to health using traditional African methods. Mutwa was told by his grandfather that the illness he had undergone “had actually been a sacred illness which required that I had to become a shaman, a healer.” Mutwa agreed, and, having renounced Christianity, was initiated into the shamanic path by his aunt Myrna, a fully fledged sangoma. Mutwa’s ‘spiritual sickness’ had been part of the initiatory process of becoming a shaman, and is a common aspect of shamanic traditions all over the world.

Sadly, when his father and stepmother learned that he had become a ‘heathen’, they immediately disowned him, telling him “never to set foot in their home again.” Virtually alone and homeless, Mutwa began to travel “for knowledge, in search of clarity of mind and in search of the truth about my people.” He journeyed all over the country, meeting, and studying under, a number of traditional healers. His first destination was Swaziland. He then made his way to Mozambique, and later, Rhodesia (now called Zimbabwe). At the end of this not only physical, but spiritual, journey, he realised his life’s purpose – to help preserve the culture of his people, and to help mend the problems in his country, of drugs, unemployment, crime, disease and poverty. Mutwa’s first book, Indaba, My Children: African Folk Tales, was published in 1964, and is considered a classic. His other works include: Africa Is My Witness (1966), My People (1971), Let Not My Country Die (1986), and Zulu Shaman: Dreams, Prophecies, and Mysteries (1996).

Very much a cosmic thinker, Mutwa claims that many of humanity’s difficulties can be explained by the negative influence of manipulative extraterrestrial beings, particularly the mantindane, who “share the Earth with us. They need us. They use us. They harvest things from us.” It’s about time, he says, that we acknowledged the alien presence on this planet. “We are being watched, we are being explored and investigated, and we are being controlled, and yet there are those among us who refuse to accept this fact,” he explains in Zulu Shaman.

Continue to read:
[link to www.newdawnmagazine.com]

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IAM LEGION

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07/16/2013 07:10 PM
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