Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 2,225 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 802,406
Pageviews Today: 1,105,025Threads Today: 200Posts Today: 5,145
11:26 AM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

Examples of the study of philosophy.

 
U3

User ID: 9834739
United States
05/28/2013 10:57 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
The mere notion of questioning fulfills the need of answering.
 Quoting: 0verlord


Being non-superstitious isn't enough
We Must Interrogate Nature


mxplx.com
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1605487





Nice website. Thanks.

I created a private blog for this very same reason but I still have a hard time keeping up with information I want to find. You've done a better job on this than I have. Kudos to you.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 40641872
United States
05/29/2013 11:00 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Nothing happened on the 15 so you've totally discredited everything you have said and will say until you explain.
Citizenperth
FUKUSHIMA, GLPTARD 24/7/365

User ID: 40413069
Australia
05/29/2013 11:01 AM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
overlord
young
under educated
period
It's life as we know it, but only just.
My Fukushima Site:
[link to citizenperth.wordpress.com]
sic ut vos es vos should exsisto , denego alius vicis facio vos change , exsisto youself , proprie

GLP's best Fuku thread: Thread: *** Fukushima *** and other nuclear-----updates and links
twitter: @citizenperth
“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on it, I would use the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I knew the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”
- Albert Einstein
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 40811861
05/30/2013 12:53 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Hi again Overlord,
I see you are back again. When I see your text I immediately get tired. Because it is sooo long and english is not my language. But about the first part, as I understand it, it all is about perseption. And soon things might change for some of us. A time loop. I dunno.

The second part of your writing, that I also just skimmed through, was about the history. You tell us the history exactly as we were taught. But sorry Overlord. I don´t believe anything we were taught in school. Because:


As I understand we humans are of huge interest of other races in the Universe. We have been manipulated from the beginning of time. We are now in the end of the cycle. Meny of us have thought that something catastrophic would accure here on planet Earth. But there is a inter galactic war going on. Dates here and there. You also have come up with dates. But nothing ever happens. That is, as I believe, it is an ungoing war, so to say, between you inter galactic beings. Nobody of you want to let go of the enormous energy reserve as we humans are. Humans can harnest energy from nothing in the Universe. Men for examle can harnest enormous amount of energy prior the climax in a sex act. And many beings/entities will come in and harnest and utilise thet energy for them selves in their dimension through the body. HUMANS ARE MAGIC SOURCE OF ENERGY
That is what a lot of races out there in Universe want to continue harvesting.

Many here seem to think you are a teenage boy playing with them. I don´t.

Much Love,
Marjo Hopeakivi
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 40811861
05/30/2013 01:17 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.

Hi again Overlord,
I see you are back again. When I see your text I immediately get tired. Because it is sooo long and english is not my language. But about the first part, as I understand it, it all is about perseption. And soon things might change for some of us. A time loop. I dunno.

The second part of your writing, that I also just skimmed through, was about the history. You tell us the history exactly as we were taught. But sorry Overlord. I don´t believe anything we were taught in school. Because:


As I understand we humans are of huge interest of other races in the Universe. We have been manipulated from the beginning of time. We are now in the end of the cycle. Meny of us have thought that something catastrophic would accure here on planet Earth. But there is a inter galactic war going on. Dates here and there. You also have come up with dates. But nothing ever happens. That is, as I believe, it is an ungoing war, so to say, between you inter galactic beings. Nobody of you want to let go of the enormous energy reserve as we humans are. Humans can harnest energy from nothing in the Universe. Men for examle can harnest enormous amount of energy prior the climax in a sex act. And many beings/entities will come in and harnest and utilise thet energy for them selves in their dimension through the body. HUMANS ARE MAGIC SOURCE OF ENERGY
That is what a lot of races out there in Universe want to continue harvesting.

Many here seem to think you are a teenage boy playing with them. I don´t.

Much Love,
Marjo Hopeakivi

This is me:
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 37974959
06/01/2013 02:10 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.

Hi again Overlord,
I see you are back again. When I see your text I immediately get tired. Because it is sooo long and english is not my language. But about the first part, as I understand it, it all is about perseption. And soon things might change for some of us. A time loop. I dunno.

The second part of your writing, that I also just skimmed through, was about the history. You tell us the history exactly as we were taught. But sorry Overlord. I don´t believe anything we were taught in school. Because:


As I understand we humans are of huge interest of other races in the Universe. We have been manipulated from the beginning of time. We are now in the end of the cycle. Meny of us have thought that something catastrophic would accure here on planet Earth. But there is a inter galactic war going on. Dates here and there. You also have come up with dates. But nothing ever happens. That is, as I believe, it is an ungoing war, so to say, between you inter galactic beings. Nobody of you want to let go of the enormous energy reserve as we humans are. Humans can harnest energy from nothing in the Universe. Men for examle can harnest enormous amount of energy prior the climax in a sex act. And many beings/entities will come in and harnest and utilise thet energy for them selves in their dimension through the body. HUMANS ARE MAGIC SOURCE OF ENERGY
That is what a lot of races out there in Universe want to continue harvesting.

Many here seem to think you are a teenage boy playing with them. I don´t.

Much Love,
Marjo Hopeakivi

This is me:

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 40811861


This is also me. I like to think big. Only one person answered. One from Finland. Yes, we Finish people are different
Thread: Always think big! I want to make a GALACTIC DIFFERENCE! What about you?
[link to en.wikipedia.org]
Citizenperth
FUKUSHIMA, GLPTARD 24/7/365

User ID: 40413069
Australia
06/01/2013 02:12 AM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.

Hi again Overlord,
I see you are back again. When I see your text I immediately get tired. Because it is sooo long and english is not my language. But about the first part, as I understand it, it all is about perseption. And soon things might change for some of us. A time loop. I dunno.

The second part of your writing, that I also just skimmed through, was about the history. You tell us the history exactly as we were taught. But sorry Overlord. I don´t believe anything we were taught in school. Because:


As I understand we humans are of huge interest of other races in the Universe. We have been manipulated from the beginning of time. We are now in the end of the cycle. Meny of us have thought that something catastrophic would accure here on planet Earth. But there is a inter galactic war going on. Dates here and there. You also have come up with dates. But nothing ever happens. That is, as I believe, it is an ungoing war, so to say, between you inter galactic beings. Nobody of you want to let go of the enormous energy reserve as we humans are. Humans can harnest energy from nothing in the Universe. Men for examle can harnest enormous amount of energy prior the climax in a sex act. And many beings/entities will come in and harnest and utilise thet energy for them selves in their dimension through the body. HUMANS ARE MAGIC SOURCE OF ENERGY
That is what a lot of races out there in Universe want to continue harvesting.

Many here seem to think you are a teenage boy playing with them. I don´t.

Much Love,
Marjo Hopeakivi

This is me:

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 40811861


This is also me. I like to think big. Only one person answered. One from Finland. Yes, we Finish people are different
Thread: Always think big! I want to make a GALACTIC DIFFERENCE! What about you?
[link to en.wikipedia.org]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 40811861


Olay Hoyvia (?)
It's life as we know it, but only just.
My Fukushima Site:
[link to citizenperth.wordpress.com]
sic ut vos es vos should exsisto , denego alius vicis facio vos change , exsisto youself , proprie

GLP's best Fuku thread: Thread: *** Fukushima *** and other nuclear-----updates and links
twitter: @citizenperth
“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on it, I would use the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I knew the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”
- Albert Einstein
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 40920819
Ireland
06/01/2013 06:59 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
[Thus a problem arises as to the relation of the sense-data to
the real table, supposing there is such a thing.
The real table, if it exists, we will call a 'physical object'. Thus
we have to consider the relation of sense-data to physical objects.
The collection of all physical objects is called 'matter'. Thus our
two questions may be re-stated as follows: (1) Is there any such thing
as matter? (2) If so, what is its nature?
What do you presume? Isn't it self-evident?


Hello, I guess what you are trying to say is my perception of something e.g a table, is my reality. Your perception of the same table, is your reality, they may be the similar but have slight differences depending on what way you are "viewing" the table.
Now if I stub my toe on the same table, yes, it will hurt and I will scream and curse most likely and there will be no doubt in my mind that it is matter. That is how we percieve through our senses. If I kick it (by accident) and it hurts then it is there, matter exists.
U3

User ID: 9834739
United States
06/01/2013 11:44 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
There is no logical impossibility in the supposition that
the whole of life is a dream, in which we ourselves create all the
objects that come before us. But although this is not logically
impossible, there is no reason whatever to suppose that it is true;
and it is, in fact, a less simple hypothesis, viewed as a means of
accounting for the facts of our own life, than the common-sense
hypothesis that there really are objects independent of us, whose
action on us causes our sensations.

 Quoting: 0verlord




It is not common-sense to me that there are objects independent of myself that cause my sensations. How would I know? I cannot see anything but my perspective.
0verlord (OP)

User ID: 17284503
Australia
06/02/2013 08:04 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
I will continue the discussion. To say, over and above the sensations of colour, hardness, noise, and so on, which make up the appearance of the table to me, I assume that there is something else, of which these things are appearances. The colour ceases to exist if I shut my eyes, the sensation of hardness ceases to exist if I remove my arm from contact with the table, the sound ceases to exist if I cease to rap the table with my knuckles. But I do not believe that when all these things cease the table ceases. On the contrary, I believe that it is because the table exists continuously that all these sense-data will reappear when I open my eyes, replace my arm, and begin again to rap with my knuckles. The question we have to consider is: What is the nature of this real table, which persists independently of my perception of it?

To this question physical science gives an answer, somewhat incomplete it is true, and in part still very hypothetical, but yet deserving of respect so far as it goes. Physical science, more or less unconsciously, has drifted into the view that all natural phenomena ought to be reduced to motions. Light and heat and sound are all due to wave-motions, which travel from the body emitting them to the person who sees light or feels heat or hears sound. That which has the wave-motion is either aether or 'gross matter', but in either case is what the philosopher would call matter. The only properties which science assigns to it are position in space, and the power of motion according to the laws of motion.

Science does not deny that it may have other properties; but if so, such other properties are not useful to the man of science, and in no way assist him in explaining the phenomena. It is sometimes said that 'light is a form of wave-motion', but this is misleading, for the light which we immediately see, which we know directly by means of our senses, is not a form of wave-motion, but something quite different, something which we all know if we are not blind, though we cannot describe it so as to convey our knowledge to a man who is blind.

A wave-motion, on the contrary, could quite well be described to a blind man, since he can acquire a knowledge of space by the sense of touch; and he can experience a wave-motion by a sea voyage almost as well as we can. But this, which a blind man can understand, is not what we mean by light: we mean by light just that which a blind man can never understand, and which we can never describe to him.
Now this something, which all of us who are not blind know, is not, according to science, really to be found in the outer world: it is something caused by the action of certain waves upon the eyes and nerves and brain of the person who sees the light.

When it is said that light is waves, what is really meant is that waves are the physical cause of our sensations of light. But light itself, the thing which seeing people experience and blind people do not, is not supposed by science to form any part of the world that is independent of us and our senses. And very similar remarks would apply to other kinds of sensations.
Overlord
0verlord (OP)

User ID: 17284503
Australia
06/02/2013 08:08 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
It is not only colours and sounds and so on that are absent from the scientific world of matter, but also space as we get it through sight or touch. It is essential to science that its matter should be in a space, but the space in which it is cannot be exactly the space we see or feel.

To begin with, space as we see it is not the same as space as we get it by the sense of touch; it is only by experience in infancy that we learn how to touch things we see, or how to get a sight of things which we feel touching us. But the space of science is neutral as between touch and sight; thus it cannot be either the space of touch or the space of sight. Again, different people see the same object as of different shapes, according to their point of view. A circular coin, for example, though we should always judge it to be circular, will look oval unless we are straight in front of it. When we judge that it is circular, we are judging that it has a real shape which is not its apparent shape, but belongs to it intrinsically apart from its appearance. But this real shape, which is what concerns science, must be in a real space, not the same as anybody's apparent space.

The real space is public, the apparent space is private to the percipient. In different people's private spaces the same object seems to have different shapes; thus the real space, in which it has its real shape, must be different from the private spaces. The space of science, therefore, though connected with the spaces we see and feel, is not identical with them, and the manner of its connexion requires investigation.

We agreed provisionally that physical objects cannot be quite like our sense-data, but may be regarded as causing our sensations. These physical objects are in the space of science, which we may call 'physical' space. It is important to notice that, if our sensations are to be caused by physical objects, there must be a physical space containing these objects and our sense-organs and nerves and brain. We get a sensation of touch from an object when we are in contact with it; that is to say, when some part of our body occupies a place in physical space quite close to the space occupied by the object. We see an object (roughly speaking) when no opaque body is between the object and our eyes in physical space.


Similarly, we only hear or smell or taste an object when we are sufficiently near to it, or when it touches the tongue, or has some suitable position in physical space relatively to our body. We cannot begin to state what different sensations we shall derive from a given object under different circumstances unless we regard the object and our body as both in one physical space, for it is mainly the relative positions of the object and our body that determine what sensations we shall derive from the object.
Overlord
0verlord (OP)

User ID: 17284503
Australia
06/02/2013 08:17 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Now our sense-data are situated in our private spaces, either the space of sight or the space of touch or such vaguer spaces as other senses may give us. If, as science and common sense assume, there is one public all-embracing physical space in which physical objects are, the relative positions of physical objects in physical space must more or less correspond to the relative positions of sense-data in our private spaces.

There is no difficulty in supposing this to be the case. If we see on a road one house nearer to us than another, our other senses will bear out the view that it is nearer; for example, it will be reached sooner if we walk along the road. Other people will agree that the house which looks nearer to us is nearer; the ordnance map will take the same view; and thus everything points to a spatial relation between the houses corresponding to the relation between the sense-data which we see when we look at the houses. Thus we may assume that there is a physical space in which physical objects have spatial relations corresponding to those which the corresponding sense-data have in our private spaces. It is this physical space which is dealt with in geometry and assumed in physics and astronomy.

Assuming that there is physical space, and that it does thus correspond to private spaces, what can we know about it? We can know only what is required in order to secure the correspondence.

That is to say, we can know nothing of what it is like in itself, but we can know the sort of arrangement of physical objects which results from their spatial relations. We can know, for example, that the earth and moon and sun are in one straight line during an eclipse, though we cannot know what a physical straight line is in itself, as we know the look of a straight line in our visual space. Thus we come to know much more about the relations of distances in physical space than about the distances themselves; we may know that one distance is greater than another, or that it is along the same straight line as the other, but we cannot have that immediate acquaintance with physical distances that we have with distances in our private spaces, or with colours or sounds or other sense-data.

We can know all those things about physical space which a man born blind might know through other people about the space of sight; but the kind of things which a man born blind could never know about the space of sight we also cannot know about physical space. We can know the properties of the relations required to preserve the correspondence with sense-data, but we cannot know the nature of the terms between which the relations hold. With regard to time, our feeling of duration or of the lapse of time is notoriously an unsafe guide as to the time that has elapsed by the clock.

Times when we are bored or suffering pain pass slowly, times when we are agreeably occupied pass quickly, and times when we are sleeping pass almost as if they did not exist. Thus, in so far as time is constituted by duration, there is the same necessity for distinguishing a public and a private time as there was in the case of space. But in so far as time consists in an order of before and after, there is no need to make such a distinction; the time-order which events seem to have is, so far as we can see, the same as the time-order which they do have.

At any rate no reason can be given for supposing that the two orders are not the same. The same is usually true of space: if a regiment of men are marching along a road, the shape of the regiment will look different from different points of view, but the men will appear arranged in the same order from all points of view. Hence we regard the order as true also in physical space, whereas the shape is only supposed to correspond to the physical space so far as is required for the preservation of the order. In saying that the time-order which events seem to have is the same as the time-order which they really have, it is necessary to guard against a possible misunderstanding.

It must not be supposed that the various states of different physical objects have the same time-order as the sense-data which constitute the perceptions of those objects. Considered as physical objects, the thunder and lightning are simultaneous; that is to say, the lightning is simultaneous with the disturbance of the air in the place where the disturbance begins, namely, where the lightning is. But the sense-datum which we call hearing the thunder does not take place until the disturbance of the air has travelled as far as to where we are. Similarly, it takes about eight minutes for the sun's light to reach us; thus, when we see the sun we are seeing the sun of eight minutes ago. So far as our sense-data afford evidence as to the physical sun they afford evidence as to the physical sun of eight minutes ago; if the physical sun had ceased to exist within the last eight minutes, that would make no difference to the sense-data which we call 'seeing the sun'. This affords a fresh illustration of the necessity of distinguishing between sense-data and physical objects.
Overlord
miqq

User ID: 35685413
Argentina
06/03/2013 12:24 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Thanks 0verlord!
So this is basically what Chaol and ecsys.org site talked about
Please google 'ecsys' as this site is off line right now
reason-n-logic

User ID: 41027548
United States
06/03/2013 12:52 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
A is A.

That's all you need to know.
 Quoting: TheOriginalMind

nice premise
yoda
[link to www.youtube.com]
[link to www.youtube.com]

Don't believe anything...
[link to www.godlikeproductions.com]
[link to www.nobeliefs.com]

Do your own research...and get your own uncle.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 41053929
United States
06/03/2013 05:17 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Ignore his BS, he copies everything and tries to make it sound original. He is just a inmature kid who is desparate for some big boy pants!!
U3

User ID: 9834739
United States
06/03/2013 09:55 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
The way in which simplicity comes in from supposing that there really
are physical objects is easily seen. If the cat appears at one moment
in one part of the room, and at another in another part, it is natural
to suppose that it has moved from the one to the other, passing over a
series of intermediate positions. But if it is merely a set of
sense-data, it cannot have ever been in any place where I did not see
it; thus we shall have to suppose that it did not exist at all while I
was not looking, but suddenly sprang into being in a new place. If
the cat exists whether I see it or not, we can understand from our own
experience how it gets hungry between one meal and the next; but if it
does not exist when I am not seeing it, it seems odd that appetite
should grow during non-existence as fast as during existence. And if
the cat consists only of sense-data, it cannot be hungry, since no
hunger but my own can be a sense-datum to me. Thus the behaviour of
the sense-data which represent the cat to me, though it seems quite
natural when regarded as an expression of hunger, becomes utterly
inexplicable when regarded as mere movements and changes of patches of
colour, which are as incapable of hunger as a triangle is of playing
football. But the difficulty in the case of the cat is nothing compared to the
difficulty in the case of human beings. When human beings speak, that
is, when we hear certain noises which we associate with ideas, and
simultaneously see certain motions of lips and expressions of face, it
is very difficult to suppose that what we hear is not the expression
of a thought, as we know it would be if we emitted the same sounds.
Of course similar things happen in dreams, where we are mistaken as to
the existence of other people. But dreams are more or less suggested
by what we call waking life, and are capable of being more or less
accounted for on scientific principles if we assume that there really
is a physical world. Thus every principle of simplicity urges us to
adopt the natural view, that there really are objects other than
ourselves and our sense-data which have an existence not dependent
upon our perceiving them.
Of course it is not by argument that we originally come by our belief
in an independent external world. We find this belief ready in
ourselves as soon as we begin to reflect: it is what may be called an
instinctive belief. We should never have been led to question this
belief but for the fact that, at any rate in the case of sight, it
seems as if the sense-datum itself were instinctively believed to be
the independent object, whereas argument shows that the object cannot
be identical with the sense-datum. This discovery,
however, which is not at all paradoxical in the case of taste and smell and sound, and
only slightly so in the case of touch, leaves undiminished our
instinctive belief that there are objects corresponding to our
sense-data. Since this belief does not lead to any difficulties, but
on the contrary tends to simplify and systematize our account of our
experiences, there seems no good reason for rejecting it. We may
therefore admit, though with a slight doubt derived from dreams, that
the external world does really exist, and is not wholly dependent for
its existence upon our continuing to perceive it.


 Quoting: 0verlord



RE: the cat example. Just because it doesn't make sense to you that the cat is hungry, doesn't mean that the cat exists independent of your observing it. You are giving all the meaning to your observations. So, you expect the cat to be hungry.

How do you explain the double slit experiment?
U3

User ID: 9834739
United States
06/03/2013 09:59 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Well, I see, Overlord, that you have answered with more text. I'm still working on your posts on page 1.

While I appreciate your willingness to teach us, is there any chance you would consider answering some questions directly and with just a few sentences?

Thanks
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 40367342
United States
06/03/2013 11:25 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Overlord, I enjoy your threads as they are always very informative.

Would you considered telling us the truth behind the Roman Empire?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 40398060
United Kingdom
06/04/2013 10:32 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Hey OP i thought your other thread was your last message. What happened to the mass awakening you promised. Explain yourself
Montblanc
User ID: 41193251
Portugal
06/05/2013 06:07 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Overlord, I enjoy your threads as they are always very informative.

Would you considered telling us the truth behind the Roman Empire?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 40367342


Thats easy, you have to research the works of roman and greek historians ranging from 700 bc to 100 ac. Cicero wrote a lot about roman history and philosophy for example, trust me you will find many things they don't teach or at least do not openly admit in school.
0verlord (OP)

User ID: 17390606
Australia
06/13/2013 03:40 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Examples of the study of philosophy.
Overlord, I enjoy your threads as they are always very informative.

Would you considered telling us the truth behind the Roman Empire?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 40367342


The Roman Empire was a miniature form of your civilization.
Overlord

News








Proud Member Of The Angry Mob