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Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”

 
Dilatoriness
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04/29/2006 02:20 PM
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Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
He may be 88, but he sure knows how to stick it to him.

Despite more than two centuries of pressure to change and "modernize" the Senate, as an institution, it remains remarkably similar to the body created at the Constitutional Convention in 1787. It retains all of its original powers, including providing advice and consent -- yes. You said it. You better read that again in the Constitution.

It retains all of its original powers, including providing advice and consent to Presidents on nominations and on treaties, serving as a court of impeachment--you better believe it, Mr. President. The Senate can send you home. You better believe that.

If the House impeaches you, the Senate will try you. The Senate, don't forget it, serves as a court of impeachment and has an equal say with the House on legislation.

--Senator Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV), August 24, 2006

OUCH! That's gotta sting.

But, no one deserves it more than Bush - except Cheney.



Full transcript:

THE SENATE AS A SAUCER -- (Senate - April 24, 2006)

[Page: S3408]

---

Mr. BYRD. Mr. President, an oft-repeated metaphor compares the U.S. Senate to a saucer in which a hot liquid is poured to cool. The earliest known written version of this story appears in an 1871 letter from constitutional law professor Francis Lieber to Ohio Representative and later President James A. Garfield. Lieber recounted a story he had heard about Thomas Jefferson's visit to Mount Vernon where Jefferson disagreed with Gen. George Washington over the need for a bicameral legislature, and Washington's response:

``You, yourself,'' said the General, ``have proved the excellence of two houses this very moment.''

``I,'' said Jefferson. ``How is that, General?''

``You have,'' replied the heroic sage, ``turned your hot tea from the cup into the saucer, to get it cool. It is the same thing we desire of the two houses.''

The Washington-Jefferson dialogue drew further attention in the writings of the late 19th century American historian Moncure D. Conway, who altered the language and the beverage:

There is a tradition that on his return from France, Jefferson called Washington to account at the breakfast table for having agreed to a second chamber.

``Why,'' asked Washington, ``did you pour that coffee into the saucer? Why did you do that?''

``To cool it,'' answered Jefferson.

``Even so,'' said Washington, ``we pour legislation into the senatorial saucer to cool it.''

Francis Lieber never discovered the source of this delicious anecdote, but whether or not the incident really occurred, the story has been widely embraced because it conveys the essence--the essence--yes, the essence--of the U.S. Senate. What is the essence? It is a deliberative body. It is a deliberative body sheltered from shifting public opinion by longer and staggered terms, and originally by being elected via the State legislatures. It serves as a counterbalance to the U.S. House of Representatives.

The saucer story explains, in simple terms, the significance of the Senate, from its origins through its evolution into the most powerful upper body of any national legislature in the world. Do you get that? Think about that.

Senators and other close observers of the institution have grappled with their own ideas about the Senate seeking to highlight its unique and enduring attributes, and to explain its role

[Page: S3409]

in the American system of checks and balances. What is it? What is it? What is it that makes the Senate stand apart from other legislative bodies? What is it? What is it that makes the Senate stand apart from other legislative bodies?

Why have its seemingly arcane rules and traditions survived, and what purpose do they serve? Over the next few months, the Lord willing--

You see, from the Book of James in the Bible, don't say ``I'll go here'' or ``I'll go there,'' to this city or that city, and I will be this or that. You better qualify that. As my old mom used to say: Robert, you must say, ``if the Lord willing.'' If the Lord wills it, you will do thus and so--if the Lord willing, or God willing. That has stuck by me all through these 80 and more years: If the Lord wills it.

Over the next few months, the Lord willing--I can't say that. You know, if I say over the next few months, who knows? But, if the Lord wills it--God willing, in other words--over the next few months I plan to offer a series of addresses in which I shall sample these ideas of the Senate with some explanation of each observer. Their ideas have ranged from the necessity of the Senate to its role as a balance wheel with the ``people's House,'' the other body. They have focused on the rules of the Senate and its civility and decorum. They have viewed the Senate as a protector of constitutional liberties, a source of stability, and a product of politics.

As a deliberative body, the Senate has been hailed as a place for second thoughts, as a continuing body, and as an institution that values its traditions. The form of Senate elections, changed by constitutional amendment, and the rules for unlimited debate and cloture have been adjusted over the years, but the Senate still differs in fundamental ways from the House of Representatives. It stands out, the Senate does--the Senate stands out as a body of individuals with peculiar folkways that have fostered what has been described as the ``Senate type.''

A body of equals among individuals and among States, the Senate has been a difficult institution to lead. Its deliberations have frustrated impatient Presidents. Well, who cares? Senators don't care if they frustrate Presidents. Presidents come and go. Senators may stay on and on and on.

Its deliberations have frustrated impatient Presidents, leaders of the House, and even, yes, leaders of the Senate who seek speedy enactment: Let's get it done. We are in a hurry. Let's get it done. Do it now.

Remember that TV advertisement which said, ``Do it now, do it here; do it now, do it now?''

There have been many efforts to modernize the Senate in order to meet new challenges. I have been here a long time. I have seen these efforts on the part of Senators. Some of them come over from the House of Representatives. They want to make this body into another House--let's get it done. Get it done; do it now; do it here; fast.

Yes, there have been many efforts to modernize the Senate in order to meet new challenges. Able leaders have demonstrated courage and skill in forging alliances and building friendships to pass legislation. I did that when I was leader of the Senate. I forged alliances with such and such a Senator. I forged an alliance. Despite more than two centuries of pressure to change and ``modernize''--let's put quotation marks around that word, ``modernize''--despite more than two centuries of pressures to change and ``modernize,'' the Senate, as an institution, remains remarkably similar to the body created at the Constitutional Convention in 1787. It retains all of its original powers, including providing advice and consent--yes. You said it. You better read that again in the Constitution. It retains all of its original powers, including providing advice and consent to Presidents on nominations and on treaties, serving as a court of impeachment--you better believe it, Mr. President. The Senate can send you home. You better believe that.

If the House impeaches you, the Senate will try you. The Senate, don't forget it, serves as a court of impeachment and has an equal say with the House on legislation. The Senate has an equal say with the other body on legislation.

As my statements in the weeks ahead--Lord willing, God willing--will suggest, the distinctive features of the Senate have survived for so long because they have purpose and will endure as long as they serve the good of the Nation.

Mr. President, I yield the floor, and I suggest the absence of a quorum.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will call the roll.

The assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.

Mr. WYDEN. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the order for the quorum call be dispensed with.

The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
I am here to challenge your indoctrinated false belief that flaming queens don't use shovels ...
Dilatoriness (OP)

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04/29/2006 02:24 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
If the Senate only would use that power to get him impeached.
I am here to challenge your indoctrinated false belief that flaming queens don't use shovels ...
Anonymous Coward
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04/29/2006 04:40 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
applause
Johnny Danger

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04/29/2006 04:43 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
Bush isn't going anywhere unless the Council on Foreign Relations WANTS him to go somewhere. Most of the Senate, if not all is CFR: So is the House and even those you see on Fox News, and in the Bush Admin.
Anonymous Coward
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04/29/2006 04:54 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
BIRD IS A KNOWN KKK GRANDMASTER.HOW MANY BLACKS HAS HE HANGED?HE IS ALSO ROCKEFELLERS BUTT BOY LMAO
Dilatoriness (OP)

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04/29/2006 04:57 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
This is about Byrd, not Bird.
I am here to challenge your indoctrinated false belief that flaming queens don't use shovels ...
Anonymous Coward
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04/29/2006 04:58 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
BYRD BIRD TURD LOL BIRD TURD THE NAZI KK BISH flip
Dilatoriness (OP)

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04/29/2006 04:59 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
Lynk, oops I mean link to prove that?
I am here to challenge your indoctrinated false belief that flaming queens don't use shovels ...
Anonymous Coward
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04/29/2006 05:07 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
George Bush,i believe thinks he is above the law--and probably is.However if the democrats get back the majority in the mid terms ,he will find out quickly he is not.

Our only hope.
Dilatoriness (OP)

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04/29/2006 05:17 PM
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Re: Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) to Bush: “The Senate can send you home. You Better Believe That.”
I think it will mean a major disturbance for the bushyCo if Rove will be indicted indeed.
I am here to challenge your indoctrinated false belief that flaming queens don't use shovels ...

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