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>>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<

 
K Hall

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11/09/2013 03:33 PM

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>>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
So there are several members of GLP producing superb images of the comets, particularly C/2012 S1 (ISON) but these are produced from pricey equipment by people who invest a lot of time and effort in producing the images, what if you want to see for yourself?

First the good news comet C/2013 R1 ( Lovejoy ) can now be seen by just about anyone with a pair of binoculars, and if you are viewing from a dark sky sight, with the naked eye. I went out early this morning and to my surprise Lovejoy was no problem for 10x50 hand-held binoculars in a light polluted sky! If you have a small telescope you will get even better results. If you are heading to your favourite dark sky site in the hills you will get the best views of all.

So how to find Lovejoy without a goto or other fancy gadget. Well here is a finder chart.

[link to astrobob.areavoices.com]

The second diagram shows Lovejoy's position through early November. If you are observing from a light polluted sky ( I was looking over London ) Then Cancer, a faint constellation, can be hard to spot. I made a triangle from Jupiter to Procyon to the target M44, the Beehive Cluster. M44 is easy to recognise. An open cluster of varied stars, it's really worth seeking out.

[link to www.astro.uni.wroc.pl]

Once you have found M44 sweep you binoculars left ( northern hemisphere people ) a short distance and you will see a small oval cloud, the Beehive cluster should still be just in view, although each day that passes the comet is moving further away. You won't see much detail unless you are in a dark sky site.

I found that a small telescope gave a better view. Use your lowest magnification to make the most of the telescopes light gathering power. I found that a skyglow filter improved contrast but reduced the brightness too much. I got the best results from using averted vision, look slightly to one side of the comet, I found this made a bright centre appear out of the coma. You won't see any colours, we need brighter lights to see colour so you will see this a dim grey/blue-grey cloud.

What about ISON that has everybody excited. Well for me it was not worth bothering with. ISON is low in the morning sky. Looking through the thicker atmosphere wipes out diffuse, cloudy objects like comets, combine that with the light pollution close to my eyeline and the relative faintness of ISON, I am going to wait until after perihelion when it might have a bright tail in the evening twilight. If you have dark skies give it a go but be aware that it is three times dimmer than Lovejoy at the moment.

Lovejoy is visible from midnight and best seen a couple of hours before dawn, when it high in the sky. ISON is just peeking over the horizon at that time so you will have to catch it just before the sky lightens.

Look out for ISON images on GLP by SnowboardingAlien, Ghetto Monk, and Dr. Astro. If anyone else is making images add your username into the thread.

K
K Hall (OP)

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11/09/2013 05:24 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
TL;DR version

You can now see comet Lovejoy with binoculars or maybe the naked eye. For the time being ISON is more difficult to see.

K
K Hall (OP)

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11/10/2013 04:36 AM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
Once you have found M44 sweep you binoculars left a short distance and you will see a small oval cloud,


 Quoting: K Hall


And to the right for Australian and other Southern hemisphere observers.

K
K Hall (OP)

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11/10/2013 01:05 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
ISON has been spotted through binoculars by several people, more on this thread.

Thread: COMET ISON: Now visible with Binoculars (depending where you are)?

This is probably still too difficult from light polluted urban or suburban skies but the situation might improve over the coming days.

K
Anonymous Coward
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11/10/2013 06:06 PM
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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
5a


You can't see this from Florida.
NOLAangel

User ID: 11685234
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11/12/2013 09:08 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
Thanks for posting. If the clouds are not to bad overnight, am going to try and capture some pics of Lovejoy.
Life is forever changing. Prepare and beware.
Hydra

User ID: 49884084
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11/12/2013 09:34 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) on Nov. 11, 2013 - light pollution was quite high:

C2013R1

Meade 10" SC
EOS 550D prime focus
10 x 10sec 800 ASA
10 x 10sec 1600 ASA
10 x 10sec 3200 ASA
30 images stacked

No chance to get ISON, early morning fog came in and spoiled the fun.

.
If the Moon is off, if Earth wobbles or if there is a pole shift
how can things like this, predicted decades ago, happen?

aseindia
Annular Solar Eclipse - January 15, 2010 - Rameshwaram, India
NOLAangel

User ID: 11685234
United States
11/12/2013 09:42 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) on Nov. 11, 2013 - light pollution was quite high:

C2013R1

Meade 10" SC
EOS 550D prime focus
10 x 10sec 800 ASA
10 x 10sec 1600 ASA
10 x 10sec 3200 ASA
30 images stacked

No chance to get ISON, early morning fog came in and spoiled the fun.

.
 Quoting: Hydra


Nice pic Hydra. hf

Hoping to catch some nice pics too.
Life is forever changing. Prepare and beware.
K Hall (OP)

User ID: 5569960
United Kingdom
11/13/2013 07:48 AM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
Thanks for posting. If the clouds are not to bad overnight, am going to try and capture some pics of Lovejoy.
 Quoting: NOLAangel


I hope you got a good view, it's nice and high in the late morning so no need to worry about the murk near the horizon. Feel free to post here if you got any shots.

K
Anonymous Coward
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11/13/2013 07:52 AM
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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
banana2
K Hall (OP)

User ID: 5569960
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11/13/2013 09:36 AM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
There is a very active thread here about the brightest comets currently visible. There is up to date information about viewing the comets at the end of the thread.

Thread: Comet ISON brightens a magnitude or more overnight!!!! 11/14/13!!! expert: have not seen any comet like this in 50 years of observing!!

K
K Hall (OP)

User ID: 5569960
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11/13/2013 02:29 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) on Nov. 11, 2013 - light pollution was quite high:

C2013R1

Meade 10" SC
EOS 550D prime focus
10 x 10sec 800 ASA
10 x 10sec 1600 ASA
10 x 10sec 3200 ASA
30 images stacked

No chance to get ISON, early morning fog came in and spoiled the fun.

.
 Quoting: Hydra


Great picture Hydra, thanks for adding it here ! I managed to get that brighter area of the coma "pop out" with averted vision. Sorry to hear you couldn't get any ISON images, it's going to get harder now it's dropping down into the thick, pre-dawn air, at street light level, despite a brightening event being reported.

You have what I would regard as a large aperture telescope and like me, you are viewing light polluted skies. Do Neodymium / skyglow filters work well for you? What is the limiting magnitude of nebulae in your light polluted skies with you telescope?

Thanks,

K
Hydra

User ID: 49884084
Germany
11/13/2013 06:47 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
Great picture Hydra, thanks for adding it here ! I managed to get that brighter area of the coma "pop out" with averted vision. Sorry to hear you couldn't get any ISON images, it's going to get harder now it's dropping down into the thick, pre-dawn air, at street light level, despite a brightening event being reported.
 Quoting: K Hall

And the weather forecast don't look good :(


Do Neodymium / skyglow filters work well for you?
 Quoting: K Hall

I have an Astronomik CLS - with most objects I couldn't see much difference. Also I don't like that it changes the color to green.


What is the limiting magnitude of nebulae in your light polluted skies with you telescope?
 Quoting: K Hall

It debends on the conditions. Even a very thin high clowd layer (thin haze) reflects the city lights and reduces the visibility. Though there are some days even in the city with quite dark skys.

The visual limits range from mag 6 to mag 9. Photographic well condensed objects like globular cluster or M110, M32, M57 or M27 (all around mag 8 to 9) are no problem. The more fluffy objects like M33 are a problem, though it's mag 5.7.


The conditions during the C/2013 R1 shots were medium (6-7/10). The dimmest star I got in the photos was mag 14.9 the brightest was mag 11 (hardly to see in the image area I posted).

.
If the Moon is off, if Earth wobbles or if there is a pole shift
how can things like this, predicted decades ago, happen?

aseindia
Annular Solar Eclipse - January 15, 2010 - Rameshwaram, India
K Hall (OP)

User ID: 5569960
United Kingdom
11/13/2013 07:58 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
Great picture Hydra, thanks for adding it here ! I managed to get that brighter area of the coma "pop out" with averted vision. Sorry to hear you couldn't get any ISON images, it's going to get harder now it's dropping down into the thick, pre-dawn air, at street light level, despite a brightening event being reported.
 Quoting: K Hall

And the weather forecast don't look good :(


Do Neodymium / skyglow filters work well for you?
 Quoting: K Hall

I have an Astronomik CLS - with most objects I couldn't see much difference. Also I don't like that it changes the color to green.


What is the limiting magnitude of nebulae in your light polluted skies with you telescope?
 Quoting: K Hall

It depends on the conditions. Even a very thin high clowd layer (thin haze) reflects the city lights and reduces the visibility. Though there are some days even in the city with quite dark skys.

The visual limits range from mag 6 to mag 9. Photographic well condensed objects like globular cluster or M110, M32, M57 or M27 (all around mag 8 to 9) are no problem. The more fluffy objects like M33 are a problem, though it's mag 5.7.


The conditions during the C/2013 R1 shots were medium (6-7/10). The dimmest star I got in the photos was mag 14.9 the brightest was mag 11 (hardly to see in the image area I posted).

.
 Quoting: Hydra


So for visual observations the sky literally seems to be the limit. I have seen m57 (8.8) under good suburban seeing conditions conditions, but couldn't make out the more diffuse m51 (8.4) on the same evening with a 70mm achromat. I think galaxies are the biggest victims of light pollution. BTW thanks for telling me about EU/EC the other night, I still haven't read their website though.

K
Hydra

User ID: 49937970
Germany
11/13/2013 08:58 PM

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Re: >>> COMET ! To The Hills!, Lovejoy, ISON, Binoculars, Telescope - EYEWITNESS <<<
Great picture Hydra, thanks for adding it here ! I managed to get that brighter area of the coma "pop out" with averted vision. Sorry to hear you couldn't get any ISON images, it's going to get harder now it's dropping down into the thick, pre-dawn air, at street light level, despite a brightening event being reported.
 Quoting: K Hall

And the weather forecast don't look good :(


Do Neodymium / skyglow filters work well for you?
 Quoting: K Hall

I have an Astronomik CLS - with most objects I couldn't see much difference. Also I don't like that it changes the color to green.


What is the limiting magnitude of nebulae in your light polluted skies with you telescope?
 Quoting: K Hall

It depends on the conditions. Even a very thin high clowd layer (thin haze) reflects the city lights and reduces the visibility. Though there are some days even in the city with quite dark skys.

The visual limits range from mag 6 to mag 9. Photographic well condensed objects like globular cluster or M110, M32, M57 or M27 (all around mag 8 to 9) are no problem. The more fluffy objects like M33 are a problem, though it's mag 5.7.


The conditions during the C/2013 R1 shots were medium (6-7/10). The dimmest star I got in the photos was mag 14.9 the brightest was mag 11 (hardly to see in the image area I posted).

.
 Quoting: Hydra


So for visual observations the sky literally seems to be the limit. I have seen m57 (8.8) under good suburban seeing conditions conditions, but couldn't make out the more diffuse m51 (8.4) on the same evening with a 70mm achromat. I think galaxies are the biggest victims of light pollution. BTW thanks for telling me about EU/EC the other night, I still haven't read their website though.

K
 Quoting: K Hall

I observed the same - edge on is fine but top view is difficult. Btw: the companion of M51 is much dimmer (mag 9.6)

Regarding the EU/EC: also read this - it debunks it completely - with math (what Thunderdolts & Co. avoid like the devil the holy water).
[link to dealingwithcreationisminastronomy.blogspot.de]

.
If the Moon is off, if Earth wobbles or if there is a pole shift
how can things like this, predicted decades ago, happen?

aseindia
Annular Solar Eclipse - January 15, 2010 - Rameshwaram, India

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