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Homeless activist evicted

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 139326
United States
09/04/2006 08:46 AM
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Homeless activist evicted
los angeles


For sale:one homeless village
Rent increase forces residents into shelters


By ANDREW GLAZER
The Associated Press


-------------------------------------------------------------​-------------------
September 01. 2006 8:00AM


A
community of squat, futuristic domes once billed as a utopian refuge from life on the streets is itself facing homelessness.

The silvery fiberglass structures, packed tightly on a lot in downtown Los Angeles, are being sold online to the highest bidder.

Such is the end to Dome Village - activist Ted Hayes's model of a self-governed, self-sufficient community for the homeless. Since its founding in 1993, the village has been visited by celebrities but has gone largely unnoticed by thousands of commuters buzzing past on the freeway nearby.

Hayes said a big rent increase -from $2,500 to $18,330 per month -is forcing the village from its site near the downtown Staples Center. The partnership that owns the land said the increase reflects soaring downtown property values.

Residents must leave by October.

"We have such a family here,"said Graham Foster, 51, a former nightclub manager who arrived three years ago after living for several months in a battered motor home. "Closing down is almost like an explosion."
When Dome Village was founded 13 years ago, Hayes envisioned a cooperative of 30 homeless people working and living together, and counseling each other through tough times.

About 450 people have occupied the village over the years, living in the domes and using community kitchen, laundry and bathroom facilities on the site. Families and singles alike planted gardens, paid $70 a month in rent and divided chores on the 1.25-acre lot.

Proceeds from the eBay auction will help replicate the village elsewhere in Los Angeles, Hayes said. In the meantime, families are living in shelters across the city.

About 90,000 people - including 10,000 children - are homeless in Los Angeles County on any given night, according to estimates by the homeless services authority.

Dome Village was seen as an innovative approach to the city's intractable homeless problem. Over the years, Prince Edward of England, Denzel Washington and the Beastie Boys visited the site, according to the online advertisement.

But brushes with celebrity did not immediately translate into bids. As of yesterday evening, no one had made an offer on any of the 14 domes for sale.

By ANDREW GLAZER

The Associated Press

protest
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 125023
United States
09/04/2006 09:05 AM
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Re: Homeless activist evicted
the beastie boys
can'
t pay the rent?
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 139326
United States
09/04/2006 10:06 AM
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Re: Homeless activist evicted
The Minuteman Project should pay for the new shelter. They have sure gotten their moneys worth from "token Ted".

Immigrant rights activist seeks sanctuary from deportation in Chicago church
by Esther Cervantes

Chicago immigrant rights activist Elvira Arellano started making national headlines in mid-August when she skipped a deportation appointment and took refuge in Adalberto United Methodist Church. Los Angeles homeless advocate Ted Hayes, who opposes immigration, brought her more publicity when the Minuteman border vigilante group flew him halfway across the country to try to disrupt the church's August 27 services by confronting Arellano. Although the Chicago Tribune's Andrew Wang framed the church's refusal to admit Hayes as "closing off an activist's debate," the church's pastor, Reverend Walter Coleman, says he was concerned for everyone's safety: "The Minutemen, underneath, are a very violent, racist group."

Hayes, whose chief claim to fame is being an outspoken black Republican, claims that
illegal immigration has lowered wages and pushed African Americans out of the building trades and service jobs that were our opportunity to have the American dream. Illegal immigration has also strained education and healthcare services in distressed communities, disproportionally affecting African Americans.
But should we believe Hayes? In a 2005 Wall Street Journal profile, Hayes comes across as ignorant of economic issues. The profile quotes Hayes calling for parental responsibility to halt violent crime and extolling the civility-instilling virtues of cricket lessons for inner-city kids. But neither the Journal nor Hayes mentions the wealth and income gaps between black and white, except to pooh-pooh the problems and the people who respond to them by "demanding government programs and blaming white racism...

There is a great photo of Ted Hayes in an "Uncle Sam" costume that makes him look like a charictor in the movie "Bamboozled"

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