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Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning

 
Onesmartrat
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11/23/2006 02:41 PM
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Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
The National Day of Mourning

On Thanksgiving Day, many Native Americans and their supporters gather at the top of Coles Hill, overlooking Plymouth Rock, for the "National Day of Mourning."

The first National Day of Mourning was held in 1970. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts invited Wampanoag leader Frank James to deliver a speech. When the text of Mr. James' speech, a powerful statement of anger at the history of oppression of the Native people of America, became known before the event, the Commonwealth "disinvited" him. That silencing of a strong and honest Native voice led to the convening of The National Day of Mourning.

The historical event we know today as the "First Thanksgiving" was a harvest festival held in 1621 by the Pilgrims and their Native American neighbors and allies. It has acquired significance beyond the bare historical facts. Thanksgiving has become a much broader symbol of the entirety of the American experience. Many find this a cause for rejoicing.

The dissenting view of Native Americans, who have suffered the theft of their lands and the destruction of their traditional way of life at the hands of the American nation, is equally valid. To some, the "First Thanksgiving" presents a distorted picture of the history of relations between the European colonists and their descendants and the Native People. The total emphasis is placed on the respect that existed between the Wampanoags led by the sachem Massasoit and the first generation of Pilgrims in Plymouth, while the long history of subsequent violence and discrimination suffered by Native People across America is nowhere represented.

To others, the event shines forth as an example of the respect that was possible once, if only for the brief span of a single generation in a single place, between two different cultures and as a vision of what may again be possible someday among people of goodwill.

History is not a set of "truths" to be memorized, history is an ongoing process of interpretation and learning. The true richness and depth of history come from multiplicity and complexity, from debate and disagreement and dialogue. There is room for more than one history; there is room for many voices.

Article courtesy of the Pilgrim Hall Museum Reprinted with permission

[link to www.holidays.net]




Enjoy it while it lasts; soon you will ALL be "Indians."

What goes around, comes around.




-OSR
"I should have been French."

-OSR
Mrdjs7

User ID: 153838
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11/23/2006 03:56 PM
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Re: Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
Past this thread LAST time I saw it yesterday. Just finally read it.

Turkeys killing Turkeys to celebrate killing Native Americans.........

Hmmmmmmmm..........

I have friends from the Kinton clan....
.........This Space For Rent.........
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 160333
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11/23/2006 03:58 PM
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Re: Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
the pilgrims didn't betray their native american friends

it was those nasty puritans that did it
Anonymous Coward
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11/23/2006 04:05 PM
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Re: Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
Turkeys don't like it either.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 160333
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11/23/2006 04:07 PM
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Re: Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
the turkeys who got a free trip to disney land like it

that was the most surreal white house news story i've ever seen
the pardoning of the turkey
SilverStorm
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11/23/2006 04:48 PM
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Re: Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
Timmy... GOBBLE!!!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 161965
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11/24/2006 04:24 PM
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Re: Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
November 26 is buy nothing day.

The average North American consumes 5X more than a Mexican.
10X more than a Chinese person.
30X more than someone in India.

1 billion people 86% of the world's population are consuming 86% of all the goods on the marketplace.

That leaves 14% for the remaining 5 billion people.

[link to www.youtube.com]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 161965
Canada
11/24/2006 04:33 PM
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Re: Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
November 26 is buy nothing day.

The average North American consumes 5X more than a Mexican.
10X more than a Chinese person.
30X more than someone in India.

1 billion people 86% of the world's population are consuming 86% of all the goods on the marketplace.

That leaves 14% for the remaining 5 billion people.

[link to www.youtube.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 161965



Just testing your math.

Something does'nt add up.



lol
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 162078
Australia
11/24/2006 10:07 PM
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Re: Happy Thanksgiving; The National Day of Mourning
November 26 is buy nothing day.

The average North American consumes 5X more than a Mexican.
10X more than a Chinese person.
30X more than someone in India.

1 billion people 86% of the world's population are consuming 86% of all the goods on the marketplace.

That leaves 14% for the remaining 5 billion people.

[link to www.youtube.com]



Just testing your math.

Something does'nt add up.



lol
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 161965

Think poster meant 6% rather than 86%.
figures that I'm aware of-could be wrong- are that the USA consumes about 25%.

OSR, if you're reading this.....hf

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