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A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?

 
Nurse Flesh Hammer

User ID: 55667583
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05/19/2017 04:34 AM

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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
T=2u sin(Angle)÷g should give the flight time ?

33.3 m/s ?
Live slow and die deplorable.....
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 04:36 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
depends what the ball and bat are made of
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74916408


Good point. Wiffle ball and plastic bat would mean less momentum and greater atmospheric friction effects.

Standard density ball and bat would leave the calculations fairly straghtforward.
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 04:39 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
T=2u sin(Angle)÷g should give the flight time ?

33.3 m/s ?
 Quoting: Nurse Flesh Hammer


Would be a speculation based on constants, no an accurate velocity solution.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 74877103
United Kingdom
05/19/2017 04:40 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
...


20 m/s is incorrect. However, you as well are coming somewhat close to the actual answer, and you've also yielded relevant information as to how one goes about working the problem.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74920422


stop trfyingh to be clever i tool ...as i already said u have not given any speed functions in your question. IT could have travelled at 50m/sec and travelled and caught in 2 secs ...it could have travelled at 25m/sec and was caught after travelling for 4 secs.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74877103


That is incorrect. cruise
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74920422


specialstupid
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74877103


Unless i just realised that u could solve it using vectors. Using a right angle triangle draw a base line with an gles of 30 degrees draw another line to indicate 100 metres and using trignometry work out the length of the base line and that should give the speed then it just working out the acceleration of the ball after it hit the bat......
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 74393042
Finland
05/19/2017 04:45 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
We don't even have the elevation where this happened. In what air density? What was the humidity, how much dust in the air, or is that happening in vacuum? Or on the Moon maybe? What was the position of earth in relation of the moon and the sun at that time? Wind direction & speed? And what was the height of the ball at the time the bat hit it? What was the height of the ball at the time of catching up?

We can't solve this if you don't give us proper information about these.
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 04:47 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
Speed=Distance over Time
S=D/T
So wheres the time?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 72826367
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05/19/2017 04:50 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
[link to www.physicsforums.com (secure)]
Solved
pigchef
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 74877103
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05/19/2017 04:52 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
...


stop trfyingh to be clever i tool ...as i already said u have not given any speed functions in your question. IT could have travelled at 50m/sec and travelled and caught in 2 secs ...it could have travelled at 25m/sec and was caught after travelling for 4 secs.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74877103


That is incorrect. cruise
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74920422


specialstupid
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74877103


Unless i just realised that u could solve it using vectors. Using a right angle triangle draw a base line with an gles of 30 degrees draw another line to indicate 100 metres and using trignometry work out the length of the base line and that should give the speed then it just working out the acceleration of the ball after it hit the bat......
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74877103

scratch that just realised it dont give the speed when u work out the base line it gives the distance....so back to my original point......
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 73391481
Finland
05/19/2017 04:52 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
We don't even have the elevation where this happened. In what air density? What was the humidity, how much dust in the air, or is that happening in vacuum? Or on the Moon maybe? What was the position of earth in relation of the moon and the sun at that time? Wind direction & speed? And what was the height of the ball at the time the bat hit it? What was the height of the ball at the time of catching up?

We can't solve this if you don't give us proper information about these.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74393042

Also, most solutions presuppose a fully elastic collision between the bat and the ball. It never is, and some energy is lost there.
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 04:56 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
depends what the ball and bat are made of
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74916408


Air resistance does play a role, but the answer would be much different on the moon.
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 04:58 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
The same speed it was traveling when it was caught if there's no atmosphere.
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 04:59 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
If you told us what size softball we were using we could use the known mass of the ball, the angle, and distance to calculate the force required to fire it like a cannon. The speed should work itself out from there.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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05/19/2017 05:02 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
T=2u sin(Angle)÷g should give the flight time ?

33.3 m/s ?
 Quoting: Nurse Flesh Hammer


You are so close, that I'm just going to give it to you.

The softball has to leave the bat traveling at 33.6 meters per second / 75.16 miles per hour, in order to travel 100 meters at a 30 degree angle.

Congratulations.

siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2
Bart Batsons
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05/19/2017 05:02 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
depends what the ball and bat are made of
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74916408


Air resistance does play a role, but the answer would be much different on the moon.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 73447775


which is why the padres have fleets of moonbats to monitor the winds
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 05:03 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
Speed=Distance over Time
S=D/T
So wheres the time?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 72826367


If you look up the trajectory of a projectile, you have the angle of the launch and the distance traveled. The time is derived from the gravitational constant as it is averaged through the distance of the arc. It is essentially the height of the arc. The ball is slowed at a constant rate to zero in the up direction and falls in a rate, both directions governed by gravity. The time is thus that which is necessary for a launch at thirty degrees to go 100 meters given that it will lose upward speed/momentum to gravity at a constant rate and gain it going downward also at the rate of gravity. The time is basically twice the time it would take to drop the ball from the top of the arc.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 74916408
Canada
05/19/2017 05:04 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
depends what the ball and bat are made of
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74916408


Good point. Wiffle ball and plastic bat would mean less momentum and greater atmospheric friction effects.

Standard density ball and bat would leave the calculations fairly straghtforward.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 73374315


For all we know, a "softball" could be a hardened marshmallow
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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05/19/2017 05:05 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 74920422
United States
05/19/2017 05:07 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
T=2u sin(Angle)÷g should give the flight time ?

33.3 m/s ?
 Quoting: Nurse Flesh Hammer


You are so close, that I'm just going to give it to you.

The softball has to leave the bat traveling at 33.6 meters per second / 75.16 miles per hour, in order to travel 100 meters at a 30 degree angle.

Congratulations.

siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74920422



siren2 siren2 siren2gdubgdubgdubgdubdicksiren2 siren2
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 05:10 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
Insufficient data.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 72574164
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05/19/2017 05:10 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
OP failed and dipped.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 72574164
United States
05/19/2017 05:13 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
T=2u sin(Angle)÷g should give the flight time ?

33.3 m/s ?
 Quoting: Nurse Flesh Hammer


You are so close, that I'm just going to give it to you.

The softball has to leave the bat traveling at 33.6 meters per second / 75.16 miles per hour, in order to travel 100 meters at a 30 degree angle.

Congratulations.

siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2 siren2
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74920422


Lol. Flat earth math. You'd fail trig so hard.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 74920422
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05/19/2017 05:13 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
OP failed and dipped.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 72574164


User ID: 55667583 sufficiently answered the question. In long form, the answer is 33.6393597 meters per second.

siren2
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 74916408
Canada
05/19/2017 05:16 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
We don't even have the elevation where this happened. In what air density? What was the humidity, how much dust in the air, or is that happening in vacuum? Or on the Moon maybe? What was the position of earth in relation of the moon and the sun at that time? Wind direction & speed? And what was the height of the ball at the time the bat hit it? What was the height of the ball at the time of catching up?

We can't solve this if you don't give us proper information about these.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74393042


lol it's magic
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 74920422
United States
05/19/2017 05:17 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
My participation in this thread is over. Congratulations User ID: 55667583 for coming extremely close to the right answer of 33.6393597 meters per second.

siren2 siren2
Anonymous Coward
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05/19/2017 05:18 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
d = distance = 100m
@ = angle = 30
v = velocity
g = gravity (9.8 m/s^2)

d = (v^2 X sin (2@))/g

v = 56.7 m/s
MAD CAPPER
User ID: 73447775
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05/19/2017 05:42 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
My participation in this thread is over. Congratulations User ID: 55667583 for coming extremely close to the right answer of 33.6393597 meters per second.

siren2 siren2
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 74920422


Retarded OP doth dot
Comprehending significant digits. s226
Weyoun

User ID: 22927243
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05/19/2017 07:49 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
No one still got it correct. Even OP is wrong.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 74876348
Puerto Rico
05/19/2017 07:54 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
This is a tough one. cruise
 Quoting: GLP's Science Class 74920422


100 x Tm / (cos .3)
Dontwastetime

User ID: 1445729
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05/19/2017 08:09 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
I love reading mathtard arguments. stfu
Dontwastetime
Titcoin

User ID: 69653255
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05/19/2017 08:12 AM
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Re: A softball is hit at a 30 degree angle traveling 100 meters before being caught. At what speed did it leave the bat?
45.0 m/s.

Vertical vi = 45 sin 30 = 22.5
horizontal u = 45 cos 30 which is constant

h = hi + vi t - 4.9 t^2

d = u t
100 = 45 cos 30 * t
so
t = (100/45)/cos 30

then
h = 1.3 + 22.5 t - 4.9 t^2

Last Edited by Titcoin on 05/19/2017 08:15 AM


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