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Question for the computer/internet savvy's

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 316182
United States
10/23/2007 08:14 AM
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Question for the computer/internet savvy's
In terms of band width does viewing an archived video (say on youtube) use the same amount of band width as viewing a streamlining video….?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 579
United Kingdom
10/23/2007 08:23 AM
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Re: Question for the computer/internet savvy's
file size is the same regardless of where it is hosted.

A 4mb video is 4mb whether it is streaming or direct download.
op (OP)
User ID: 316182
United States
10/23/2007 08:26 AM
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Re: Question for the computer/internet savvy's
ok, so is there any other reason it would be more difficult (for a computer) for one to view a streaming video instead of an archived one
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 579
United Kingdom
10/23/2007 08:29 AM
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Re: Question for the computer/internet savvy's
ok, so is there any other reason it would be more difficult (for a computer) for one to view a streaming video instead of an archived one
 Quoting: op 316182


simple answer - contention.

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In computer networking, the contention ratio is the ratio of the potential maximum demand to the actual bandwidth. The higher the contention ratio, the greater the number of users that may be trying to use the actual bandwidth at any one time and, therefore, the lower the effective bandwidth offered, especially at peak times. [1]

In the UK, an RADSL (Rate Adaptive Digital Subscriber Line) connection usually has a contention ratio between 20:1 and 50:1 per BT guidelines, meaning that 20 to 50 computers, each assigned or sold a bandwidth of "up to" 1 Mbit/s for instance, may be sharing 1 Mbit/s of uplink bandwidth. A good account of the state of the issue in the UK is found in a 2004 OFCOM report on wireless internet.

In the US and on satellite internet connections, the contention ratio is often higher, and other formulas are used, such as counting only those users who are actually online at a particular time. It is also less often divulged by ISPs than it is in the UK. The connection speed for each user will therefore differ depending on the number of computers using the uplink connection at the same time because the uplink (where all the low bandwidth connections join) will only handle the speed that has been implemented on that line.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 316182
United States
10/23/2007 08:52 AM
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Re: Question for the computer/internet savvy's
thanks for your help,

; - )~
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 579
United Kingdom
10/23/2007 09:00 AM
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Re: Question for the computer/internet savvy's
thanks for your help,

; - )~
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 316182


No Problem :)

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