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Guns & Ammo for Dummies

 
help!
User ID: 284299
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01/08/2008 07:04 PM
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Guns & Ammo for Dummies
I suspect that I'm not the only GLPer who glazes over in the gun threads. I am 100% a constitutionlaist and pro personal arms, but I'm a lady, don't eat meat, never hunted, and just never got involved with guns. I'm sure there are other GLPers who would like to pick up some protection (CASH!) but don't have a freaking clue about what to buy, how much it should cost, etc.

So, to those who know, help us out. Keep the language geared for the unitiated.

If I can buy one gun, what should be, and how much ammo with that purchase?
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:07 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
bump
floydian slip

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01/08/2008 07:09 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
What do you want to protect yourself from?
Omega

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01/08/2008 07:10 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
For a Lady I recommend a 20 gauge pump shotgun from Remington or Mossberg (about 300 bucks). Shotguns are preferable for newbies for defense as less skill level is required to hit your target in a panic situation.

If you live in the country get 500 rounds of buckshot. If in the city # 4 shot-less likely to go through walls and hit your neighbor.

Take a gun safety course locally.

Practice.
Handguns are a skill; shotguns an art; rifles a science.
_____________________________________
Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on whats for dinner.

Disarmament is the precursor to Genocide.

Better to take action now rather than chances later. Your choice.
Evil Twin

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01/08/2008 07:12 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Only one gun?

A pump-action shotgun. Best home defense weapon available, and good for hunting as well. They can be had for under $200 new.

As for ammo, as much as you can afford, it's only getting more expensive every day.
susano (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:14 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Thanks, Omega :)

I live in the country. It's a pretty well armed community out here.

I know that people say shotguns are good around the home and you don't have to be an ace shot, but I always wonder should I be getting something that is more long range? This is where I get bogged down. I don't think in terms of burglers, but the New World Order!
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:15 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
What do you want to protect yourself from?
 Quoting: floydian slip



I'm not sure.
Anonymous Coward
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01/08/2008 07:18 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Get a Phased-Plasma Rifle in the 40-Watt Range
Anonymous Coward
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01/08/2008 07:20 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
12ga. A 12ga kicks harder, but the ammo is easy to find. Although I'm not sure I'd recommend a pump. Especially for a woman. A semi auto would be better, less complicated, but more expensive. You'll want one with a short barrel. Shortest legal length is 18in barrel, and the shotgun must be 26 inches in overall length. Learn how to aim, not just point, the gun.

If you are looking for a handgun, I'd recommend the venerable .38 Smith and Wesson revolver, or a .380 automatic. Bersa makes a nice economical one.
Anonymous Coward
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01/08/2008 07:21 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Get a Phased-Plasma Rifle in the 40-Watt Range
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 345806


Takes too much to order one! She'll only want to look at what's on the shelves!
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:21 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Get a Phased-Plasma Rifle in the 40-Watt Range
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 345806


I know what a shotgun is and the reasons people say to get one. I don't what the thing you're talking about is, pr how much it costs.


Anyone reading this thread, Omega recommended a bokk, in another thread, that sounds worth reading:

Unintended Consequences, by John Ross. Looks like something everyone concerned with rights should read.
Evil Twin

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01/08/2008 07:22 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
A shotgun loaded with slugs can be used effectively out to 100 yds or so with practice.

If you want more reach than that, I'd suggest a bolt action rifle in .308 caliber. The variety available means you could pay anywhere from ~$150 for a surplus rifle to literally 10's of 1000's for a custom piece.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:26 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
12ga. A 12ga kicks harder, but the ammo is easy to find. Although I'm not sure I'd recommend a pump. Especially for a woman. A semi auto would be better, less complicated, but more expensive. You'll want one with a short barrel. Shortest legal length is 18in barrel, and the shotgun must be 26 inches in overall length. Learn how to aim, not just point, the gun.

If you are looking for a handgun, I'd recommend the venerable .38 Smith and Wesson revolver, or a .380 automatic. Bersa makes a nice economical one.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 3008


So, 12ga is the more common ammo and that's why you recommend it? The pump, I assume, is required prior to each shot, so takes longer to deliver several shots? How many shots can a semi automatic deliver before doing whatever it is you have to do again (pump something?)?
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:32 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
A shotgun loaded with slugs can be used effectively out to 100 yds or so with practice.

If you want more reach than that, I'd suggest a bolt action rifle in .308 caliber. The variety available means you could pay anywhere from ~$150 for a surplus rifle to literally 10's of 1000's for a custom piece.
 Quoting: Evil Twin



A shot gun shoots shells with pellets that scatter, right? Where as a rifle shoots a bullet, correct?

Whatever I get, I don't want any gun registration bullshit. Are the rules at gun shows different than in a store, and what about buying used, as you suggested? What are the rules?

I'm sure I could go in the city and pick anything on the street, but GOD knows if it may have been used in a crime. I see that as a drawback, in that respect.
Anonymous Coward
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01/08/2008 07:34 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
First (or only) gun should be a .22 rifle. Learn to shoot first! Shotgun patterns do not spread sufficiently to preclude basic aiming skills at personal defense range.

I stringly suggest you start with a Ruger 10/22 rifle. Ammo is cheap and more available than ANY other ammo & costs much less as well. Arm chair Rambo recommendations are useless for beginners.
Anonymous Coward
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01/08/2008 07:36 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Get a Phased-Plasma Rifle in the 40-Watt Range


I know what a shotgun is and the reasons people say to get one. I don't what the thing you're talking about is, pr how much it costs.


Anyone reading this thread, Omega recommended a bokk, in another thread, that sounds worth reading:

Unintended Consequences, by John Ross. Looks like something everyone concerned with rights should read.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284299


The plasma rifle is a bad joke from the Terminator movie that jackasses put into evey gun thread on GLP.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:38 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
First (or only) gun should be a .22 rifle. Learn to shoot first! Shotgun patterns do not spread sufficiently to preclude basic aiming skills at personal defense range.

I stringly suggest you start with a Ruger 10/22 rifle. Ammo is cheap and more available than ANY other ammo & costs much less as well. Arm chair Rambo recommendations are useless for beginners.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 351809


I will admit, because my concern is a war (NWO stuff), I get caught up in the "Rambo" shit, and it's WAY over my head. Basically, I want to be useful to the community in ANY scenario.

I will seek out a local gun group and get trained.

What does 10/22 mean?
Anonymous Coward
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01/08/2008 07:40 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
12ga. A 12ga kicks harder, but the ammo is easy to find. Although I'm not sure I'd recommend a pump. Especially for a woman. A semi auto would be better, less complicated, but more expensive. You'll want one with a short barrel. Shortest legal length is 18in barrel, and the shotgun must be 26 inches in overall length. Learn how to aim, not just point, the gun.

If you are looking for a handgun, I'd recommend the venerable .38 Smith and Wesson revolver, or a .380 automatic. Bersa makes a nice economical one.


So, 12ga is the more common ammo and that's why you recommend it? The pump, I assume, is required prior to each shot, so takes longer to deliver several shots? How many shots can a semi automatic deliver before doing whatever it is you have to do again (pump something?)?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284299


12ga is a very common caliber. I'll go out on a limb and say the most common shotgun caliber. You can get shells that contain lead pellets of various sizes. All the way from shot pellets intended for birds to one solid lump of lead intended as a large animal killer. For self defense purposes, 00 buck is one of the most common. Smaller buckshot, or sometimes large bird shot, is occasionally recommended for people who live in apartment buildings or have other neighbors living nearby. Shotgun pellets that are large might shoot THRU a wall and kill someone you didn't intend to shoot.

A pump shotgun requires a manual hand operated action on the weapons foregrip. You pull back on the foregrip, and the shell is ejected. It requires you coordinate yourself to make a second shot. For a new person unfamiliar with guns, you might want to go the more simple route of having a semi automatic shotgun. You load the shells, pull back on the charging handle to load the shell, then pull the trigger to fire. You don't have to worry about pumping the foregrip to eject the shell because a semi-automatic does that for you...because it is..well...automatic.

There ought to be some videos on Youtube that could illustrate the difference between semi automatic shotguns and pump.
Evil Twin

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01/08/2008 07:41 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
A shot gun shoots shells with pellets that scatter, right? Where as a rifle shoots a bullet, correct?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284299

Basically, yes. Though a shotgun can also fire 'slugs' which are just really big bullets.
Whatever I get, I don't want any gun registration bullshit. Are the rules at gun shows different than in a store, and what about buying used, as you suggested? What are the rules?

I'm sure I could go in the city and pick anything on the street, but GOD knows if it may have been used in a crime. I see that as a drawback, in that respect.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284299

There is no registration per se, but buying from a licensed dealer means you will have to pass a criminal background check. This means filling out a questionaire, and then the dealer calls in your info to the NICS system which confirms or denies you depending on whether you have any felony convictions.

The only way around that is to make a "Face to Face" purchase from a private individual. Most states require those private transactions to be reported, but I don't think the majority of them are.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 3008
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01/08/2008 07:42 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
First (or only) gun should be a .22 rifle. Learn to shoot first! Shotgun patterns do not spread sufficiently to preclude basic aiming skills at personal defense range.

I stringly suggest you start with a Ruger 10/22 rifle. Ammo is cheap and more available than ANY other ammo & costs much less as well. Arm chair Rambo recommendations are useless for beginners.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 351809


Actually that's very good advice. But the lady said she only wanted to buy one gun. Better she learn on what she'll use if she intends to keep it.
Lost Fisherman

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01/08/2008 07:47 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
12ga. A 12ga kicks harder, but the ammo is easy to find. Although I'm not sure I'd recommend a pump. Especially for a woman. A semi auto would be better, less complicated, but more expensive. You'll want one with a short barrel. Shortest legal length is 18in barrel, and the shotgun must be 26 inches in overall length. Learn how to aim, not just point, the gun.

If you are looking for a handgun, I'd recommend the venerable .38 Smith and Wesson revolver, or a .380 automatic. Bersa makes a nice economical one.


So, 12ga is the more common ammo and that's why you recommend it? The pump, I assume, is required prior to each shot, so takes longer to deliver several shots? How many shots can a semi automatic deliver before doing whatever it is you have to do again (pump something?)?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284299

I can empty a pump shotgun just as fast as a semiauto with well-aimed shots. Practice, and you'll get fast too. Plus, with a pump you get 2 benefits over a semi: first, misfires are much more quickly cleared, and second, NOTHING sounds as scary as a pump being worked behind your back. Even just imagining that sound behind me sends chills up my spine!

If you're a shorter woman, stick with a 20 gauge youth model, either remington or mossberg. If you're taller, go with the 12. With enough practice you can learn to handle the recoil of the 12. 2 cases in point: the new Maryland state record black bear was just killed by a 22-y-o female art student with a 7mm ultra mag, and I know a 5'4" lady that used to hunt geese with a 3.5" 10 gauge double barrel.

If you prefer a rifle, stick to a dirt-common caliber like .308 or .30-06, or even .223. Remington makes a great pump as well as excellent boltguns, and both are worth mounting scopes on.

Or, for something REALLY interesting and useful, get a 1911 .45 auto, and one of the carbine conversion kits - pistol for carry and home defense, carbine kit for mid-range (less than 200) yards.

Final consideration: if you want to have something easily accessorized, low recoil, light, short, and handy, get an AR-15. There are multiple companies that make it with a 16.5" lightweight barrel, folding stock, as well as mounting points for multiple devices - scopes, lights, lasers. A little pricier, but can be had for under $900 in basic configuration. You didn't mention what state you're in,
"Uhhhhhh......"
Barack Obama
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:49 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
12ga. A 12ga kicks harder, but the ammo is easy to find. Although I'm not sure I'd recommend a pump. Especially for a woman. A semi auto would be better, less complicated, but more expensive. You'll want one with a short barrel. Shortest legal length is 18in barrel, and the shotgun must be 26 inches in overall length. Learn how to aim, not just point, the gun.

If you are looking for a handgun, I'd recommend the venerable .38 Smith and Wesson revolver, or a .380 automatic. Bersa makes a nice economical one.


So, 12ga is the more common ammo and that's why you recommend it? The pump, I assume, is required prior to each shot, so takes longer to deliver several shots? How many shots can a semi automatic deliver before doing whatever it is you have to do again (pump something?)?


12ga is a very common caliber. I'll go out on a limb and say the most common shotgun caliber. You can get shells that contain lead pellets of various sizes. All the way from shot pellets intended for birds to one solid lump of lead intended as a large animal killer. For self defense purposes, 00 buck is one of the most common. Smaller buckshot, or sometimes large bird shot, is occasionally recommended for people who live in apartment buildings or have other neighbors living nearby. Shotgun pellets that are large might shoot THRU a wall and kill someone you didn't intend to shoot.

A pump shotgun requires a manual hand operated action on the weapons foregrip. You pull back on the foregrip, and the shell is ejected. It requires you coordinate yourself to make a second shot. For a new person unfamiliar with guns, you might want to go the more simple route of having a semi automatic shotgun. You load the shells, pull back on the charging handle to load the shell, then pull the trigger to fire. You don't have to worry about pumping the foregrip to eject the shell because a semi-automatic does that for you...because it is..well...automatic.

There ought to be some videos on Youtube that could illustrate the difference between semi automatic shotguns and pump.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 3008


Yeah, I wouldn't want to shoot anyone innocent! I can see why shotguns are prefered for homw protection. I think that guy in Taxas who just smoked those two burglers used a shotgun, so I assume they do the trick.

From your description, the semi sounds fatser and easier. I'm also not all that strong.

At this point, I'm thinking everyone needs THREE guns. One shotgun for the house, a handgun for easy carrying, and a rifle for if TSHTF. The first two sound the easiest to decide upon. It's rifle that I would have the most questions about.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 07:51 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
A shot gun shoots shells with pellets that scatter, right? Where as a rifle shoots a bullet, correct?

Basically, yes. Though a shotgun can also fire 'slugs' which are just really big bullets.


Whatever I get, I don't want any gun registration bullshit. Are the rules at gun shows different than in a store, and what about buying used, as you suggested? What are the rules?

I'm sure I could go in the city and pick anything on the street, but GOD knows if it may have been used in a crime. I see that as a drawback, in that respect.

There is no registration per se, but buying from a licensed dealer means you will have to pass a criminal background check. This means filling out a questionaire, and then the dealer calls in your info to the NICS system which confirms or denies you depending on whether you have any felony convictions.

The only way around that is to make a "Face to Face" purchase from a private individual. Most states require those private transactions to be reported, but I don't think the majority of them are.
 Quoting: Evil Twin


Correct if I'm wrong, but shotguns don't require registration, do they, just handguns and rifles? Also, I suspose it varies in states? If my state is not the most privacy oriented but a neigboring state is better, is it legal to but in the neighboring state and bring it back in a car?
Lost Fisherman

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01/08/2008 07:52 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
A shotgun loaded with slugs can be used effectively out to 100 yds or so with practice.

If you want more reach than that, I'd suggest a bolt action rifle in .308 caliber. The variety available means you could pay anywhere from ~$150 for a surplus rifle to literally 10's of 1000's for a custom piece.



A shot gun shoots shells with pellets that scatter, right? Where as a rifle shoots a bullet, correct?

Whatever I get, I don't want any gun registration bullshit. Are the rules at gun shows different than in a store, and what about buying used, as you suggested? What are the rules?

I'm sure I could go in the city and pick anything on the street, but GOD knows if it may have been used in a crime. I see that as a drawback, in that respect.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284299

Sorry darlin', I didn't notice this post.

Pistols & ARs will be registered, unless you get an HBAR AR-15. Stick with the pump or bolt actions. I stand by my 20 gauge/12 gauge shorter/taller recommendation. Get 2 barrels for it, one with smooth bore & interchangeable chokes, the other fully rifled with a cantilever scope mount. Then join a gun club and shoot, shoot, shoot.
"Uhhhhhh......"
Barack Obama
Omega

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01/08/2008 07:52 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Learning to shoot a rifle proficiently takes time, and money. My best recommendation for learning to shoot a rifle is get a Ruger 10/22 in .22, put a decent scope on it, and knock yourself out shooting .22 ammo for about 12 bucks per 500 rounds. Once you master that, move up to a decent caliber.

I can easily put someones eye out and kill them at 100 yards with a decent .22.

Food for thought.
Handguns are a skill; shotguns an art; rifles a science.
_____________________________________
Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on whats for dinner.

Disarmament is the precursor to Genocide.

Better to take action now rather than chances later. Your choice.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 284299
United States
01/08/2008 07:55 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
First (or only) gun should be a .22 rifle. Learn to shoot first! Shotgun patterns do not spread sufficiently to preclude basic aiming skills at personal defense range.

I stringly suggest you start with a Ruger 10/22 rifle. Ammo is cheap and more available than ANY other ammo & costs much less as well. Arm chair Rambo recommendations are useless for beginners.


Actually that's very good advice. But the lady said she only wanted to buy one gun. Better she learn on what she'll use if she intends to keep it.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 3008



See, not having used guns makes it hard to decide. I would never hunt, so that's not the issue for me. It's what is most useful and versatile.
Anonymous Coward
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01/08/2008 07:57 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Learning to shoot a rifle proficiently takes time, and money. My best recommendation for learning to shoot a rifle is get a Ruger 10/22 in .22, put a decent scope on it, and knock yourself out shooting .22 ammo for about 12 bucks per 500 rounds. Once you master that, move up to a decent caliber.

I can easily put someones eye out and kill them at 100 yards with a decent .22.

Food for thought.
 Quoting: Omega


Got to agree with Omega, for a change.

Ruger 10/22 is one of the most popular models of semiautomatic rifles. You can get a new one in stailess stell (will not rust, easy to clean) for less than 200 bucks. Many military style accesories are available for the 10/22, including high capaity magazines.
Omega

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01/08/2008 07:59 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
And I'll add the best site on the internet to learn about customizing a 10/22 is here.

[link to www.rimfirecentral.com]
Handguns are a skill; shotguns an art; rifles a science.
_____________________________________
Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on whats for dinner.

Disarmament is the precursor to Genocide.

Better to take action now rather than chances later. Your choice.
Lost Fisherman

User ID: 281070
United States
01/08/2008 08:00 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
12ga. A 12ga kicks harder, but the ammo is easy to find. Although I'm not sure I'd recommend a pump. Especially for a woman. A semi auto would be better, less complicated, but more expensive. You'll want one with a short barrel. Shortest legal length is 18in barrel, and the shotgun must be 26 inches in overall length. Learn how to aim, not just point, the gun.

If you are looking for a handgun, I'd recommend the venerable .38 Smith and Wesson revolver, or a .380 automatic. Bersa makes a nice economical one.


So, 12ga is the more common ammo and that's why you recommend it? The pump, I assume, is required prior to each shot, so takes longer to deliver several shots? How many shots can a semi automatic deliver before doing whatever it is you have to do again (pump something?)?


12ga is a very common caliber. I'll go out on a limb and say the most common shotgun caliber. You can get shells that contain lead pellets of various sizes. All the way from shot pellets intended for birds to one solid lump of lead intended as a large animal killer. For self defense purposes, 00 buck is one of the most common. Smaller buckshot, or sometimes large bird shot, is occasionally recommended for people who live in apartment buildings or have other neighbors living nearby. Shotgun pellets that are large might shoot THRU a wall and kill someone you didn't intend to shoot.

A pump shotgun requires a manual hand operated action on the weapons foregrip. You pull back on the foregrip, and the shell is ejected. It requires you coordinate yourself to make a second shot. For a new person unfamiliar with guns, you might want to go the more simple route of having a semi automatic shotgun. You load the shells, pull back on the charging handle to load the shell, then pull the trigger to fire. You don't have to worry about pumping the foregrip to eject the shell because a semi-automatic does that for you...because it is..well...automatic.

There ought to be some videos on Youtube that could illustrate the difference between semi automatic shotguns and pump.


Yeah, I wouldn't want to shoot anyone innocent! I can see why shotguns are prefered for homw protection. I think that guy in Taxas who just smoked those two burglers used a shotgun, so I assume they do the trick.

From your description, the semi sounds fatser and easier. I'm also not all that strong.

At this point, I'm thinking everyone needs THREE guns. One shotgun for the house, a handgun for easy carrying, and a rifle for if TSHTF. The first two sound the easiest to decide upon. It's rifle that I would have the most questions about.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284299

For the rifle, best bang for the buck (pun intended) is the Stevens model 200 with a 3-9 leupold or burris scope. Don't get the big objective lenses. Look for models described as "3-9x32" or "3-9x36" - 3-9 is the magnification range, 32 or 36 are the diameters of the objective (furthest from your eye) lens. Use Leupold, Burris, or Redfield 2-piece mount and low rings. Complete kit should come in under $500.00.
"Uhhhhhh......"
Barack Obama
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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01/08/2008 08:01 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
12ga. A 12ga kicks harder, but the ammo is easy to find. Although I'm not sure I'd recommend a pump. Especially for a woman. A semi auto would be better, less complicated, but more expensive. You'll want one with a short barrel. Shortest legal length is 18in barrel, and the shotgun must be 26 inches in overall length. Learn how to aim, not just point, the gun.

If you are looking for a handgun, I'd recommend the venerable .38 Smith and Wesson revolver, or a .380 automatic. Bersa makes a nice economical one.


So, 12ga is the more common ammo and that's why you recommend it? The pump, I assume, is required prior to each shot, so takes longer to deliver several shots? How many shots can a semi automatic deliver before doing whatever it is you have to do again (pump something?)?

I can empty a pump shotgun just as fast as a semiauto with well-aimed shots. Practice, and you'll get fast too. Plus, with a pump you get 2 benefits over a semi: first, misfires are much more quickly cleared, and second, NOTHING sounds as scary as a pump being worked behind your back. Even just imagining that sound behind me sends chills up my spine!

If you're a shorter woman, stick with a 20 gauge youth model, either remington or mossberg. If you're taller, go with the 12. With enough practice you can learn to handle the recoil of the 12. 2 cases in point: the new Maryland state record black bear was just killed by a 22-y-o female art student with a 7mm ultra mag, and I know a 5'4" lady that used to hunt geese with a 3.5" 10 gauge double barrel.

If you prefer a rifle, stick to a dirt-common caliber like .308 or .30-06, or even .223. Remington makes a great pump as well as excellent boltguns, and both are worth mounting scopes on.

Or, for something REALLY interesting and useful, get a 1911 .45 auto, and one of the carbine conversion kits - pistol for carry and home defense, carbine kit for mid-range (less than 200) yards.

Final consideration: if you want to have something easily accessorized, low recoil, light, short, and handy, get an AR-15. There are multiple companies that make it with a 16.5" lightweight barrel, folding stock, as well as mounting points for multiple devices - scopes, lights, lasers. A little pricier, but can be had for under $900 in basic configuration. You didn't mention what state you're in,
 Quoting: Lost Fisherman



I'm in Michigan and have no idea what the laws are. I know people who do, though, so I'll get with them. I think I'll go to the next gun show in town.

I don't know anything about those caliburs you mentioned, like what is for a rifle or what, or what is the dealiest.

I DO want to learn how to handle, clean, and shoot whatever. Guns scare me because I'm totally ignorant. I would never want to make a mistake. I figure you shoot to kill and better have a clear head when you make that decision. Confindence and good judgement will come with familiarity, I hope.
Evil Twin

User ID: 106002
United States
01/08/2008 08:01 PM
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Re: Guns & Ammo for Dummies
Correct if I'm wrong, but shotguns don't require registration, do they, just handguns and rifles? Also, I suspose it varies in states? If my state is not the most privacy oriented but a neigboring state is better, is it legal to but in the neighboring state and bring it back in a car?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284299

Gun laws vary widely by state, and I can only speak with any authority about Florida's gun laws.

Here's a decent site to start researching the laws in your state.
[link to crime.about.com]