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The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us

 
Extinct
User ID: 403240
United Kingdom
03/29/2008 04:44 PM
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The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us
The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us.

“Sometimes I think my head is so big because it is so full of dreams,” says John Merrick in the play The Elephant Man. He might have been speaking for the Boskops, an almost forgotten group of early humans who lived in southern Africa between 30,000 and 10,000 years ago. Judging from fossil remains, scientists say the Boskops were similar to modern humans but had small, childlike faces and huge melon heads that held brains about 30 percent larger than our own.

That’s what fascinates psychiatrist Gary Lynch and cognitive scientist Richard Granger. “Just as we’re smarter than apes, they were probably smarter than us,” they speculate. More insightful and self-reflective than modern humans, with fantastic memories and a penchant for dreaming, the Boskops may have had “an internal mental life literally beyond anything we can imagine.” Lynch and Granger base their characterization on our current understanding of how the human brain works, describing in detail its physiology and structure and comparing it with the brains of other primates. They also explore what the Boskops’ big brains tell us about evolution (why didn’t they survive?) and about the future of human intelligence (can we engineer bigger brains?). These are questions, one suspects, that even the smallest-brained Boskop would have approved of.

[link to discovermagazine.com]
Aliens (OP)
User ID: 403240
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03/29/2008 04:49 PM
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Re: The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us
Aliens from Earth?

The UFO phenomenon is innately slippery, forcing researchers to adopt various paradigms in order to explain it. I'm personally satisfied that we're dealing with a form of nonhuman intelligence ... but how sure are we that this intelligence is from space, as commonly assumed? The following in an excerpt from a manuscript I'm working on. In it, I attempt to set the tone for a speculative re-examination of the UFO evidence:

Looking down from a sufficient distance, human habitation recedes to the merest glimmer. As night devours the continents, our seeming dominion vanishes, replaced by scattered constellations, the haughty gleam of our cities suddenly as substantial as a skein of campfires. As the dark deepens, we realize with mounting unease just how tenuous our presence is; the mountains, prairies and lakes, denuded of daylight, taunt us with their enormity.

Then there are the oceans, almost entirely vacant of man-made lights. Our seas, so often taken for granted, are like vast tombs from which even the most unseemly phantasms might emerge; we ply their waters at our own peril, distantly aware that we might find ourselves in the company of others.

The Earth is ancient, its biosphere only slightly less so. For four-billion years our world has has secreted life. The advent of homo sapiens is alarmingly recent in comparison. We're like foundlings washed upon some alien shore, stifling our fears by pretending to a feeble omnipotence. Having launched spacecraft to the outer planets and inspected the crater-pocked wastes of Mars through the unblinking eyes of rovers, it's easy to entertain the idea that we're the first, evolution's sole successful stab at the phenomenon we casually term "intelligence."

Yet as we watch night erode the familiar highways and stadiums and ever-encroaching suburbs, our confidence falters. Already, technological forecasters envision a near-future populated by our artificially intelligent offspring. Perhaps as our most cherished certainties crumble in the glow of a new century -- full of danger, portent and enigma -- it's become relatively easy to contemplate the presence of the Other: not an other new to our planet, but one predating our own genetic regime. Something unspoken and ancient yet nevertheless amenable to science . . . an intelligence with an almost-human face, until recently content to abide by the shadows of our complacency.

But since the middle of the last century it seems to have asserted itself with a vigor hitherto found only in the domain of folklore. Understandably daunted, we've relegated its existence to the margins of perception: hallucination, war fever, misunderstood natural phenomena, delusion, butchered recollections of dreams best left forgotten. We see lights dancing in our sky and invoke impossible meteors. Landed vehicles accompanied by surreal humanoids become military test aircraft and their diminutive pilots. The emaciated creatures seen aboard apparent spacecraft -- or, more portentously, within rock-walled caverns -- are summarily dismissed as sheerest fantasy or, at best, as the spawn of novel brain dysfunctions.

In the decades since 1947, dawn of the contemporary UFO era, we've confronted a parade of strangeness that has rallied uncritical enthusiasts and rattled entrenched authority, leaving a bizarre residue that defies attempts at categorization as certainly as it elicits hypotheses.

[link to www.seti.com]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 402888
Australia
03/29/2008 05:29 PM
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Re: The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us
The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us.

“Sometimes I think my head is so big because it is so full of dreams,” says John Merrick in the play The Elephant Man. He might have been speaking for the Boskops, an almost forgotten group of early humans who lived in southern Africa between 30,000 and 10,000 years ago. Judging from fossil remains, scientists say the Boskops were similar to modern humans but had small, childlike faces and huge melon heads that held brains about 30 percent larger than our own.

That’s what fascinates psychiatrist Gary Lynch and cognitive scientist Richard Granger. “Just as we’re smarter than apes, they were probably smarter than us,” they speculate. More insightful and self-reflective than modern humans, with fantastic memories and a penchant for dreaming, the Boskops may have had “an internal mental life literally beyond anything we can imagine.” Lynch and Granger base their characterization on our current understanding of how the human brain works, describing in detail its physiology and structure and comparing it with the brains of other primates. They also explore what the Boskops’ big brains tell us about evolution (why didn’t they survive?) and about the future of human intelligence (can we engineer bigger brains?). These are questions, one suspects, that even the smallest-brained Boskop would have approved of.

[link to discovermagazine.com]
 Quoting: Extinct 403240


These smart ones then ran into us:

[link to discovermagazine.com]

HLSS
Viper
User ID: 312619
United States
03/29/2008 06:11 PM
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Re: The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us
It's very easy to become non-violent and stay that way. I do not believe that we are an aggressive species. I believe that we are defensive one.
The Nuke Guy
User ID: 403296
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03/29/2008 06:12 PM
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Re: The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us
It's very easy to become non-violent and stay that way. I do not believe that we are an aggressive species. I believe that we are defensive one.
 Quoting: Viper 312619

we gotta use those nukes if we want peace!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 402888
Australia
03/29/2008 11:40 PM
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Re: The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us
It's very easy to become non-violent and stay that way. I do not believe that we are an aggressive species. I believe that we are defensive one.
 Quoting: Viper 312619


I agree, I remember a doco on the social organization of a group of gorillas that worked out their order by the act of love. Really interesting. It might be true "Make Love not War".

HLSS
Irdooomed

User ID: 403488
Australia
03/30/2008 12:57 AM
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Re: The Extinct Human Species That Was Smarter Than Us
So what you're saying is three million years ago, our ancestor met their ancestor. Their ancestor was smarter so either manipulated or ripped off our ancestor, or our ancestor was just scared of this other being...

Our ancestor then promptly beat the other being to death and hunted them into extinction, sort of like what we did to the neanderthals...

So a hundred years ago someone found this thing in a dig as they do and thought, 'hey with this really big brain, I wonder how smart this critter is ?.'

If this critter was alive we'd have found him sooner.
So someone grows some blood cells from the critter in a dish somewhere, and after several decades a critter crashes some craft made from the ideas of a guy guy called tesla...

Wow, that's a hell of a story... Makes you kind of wonder what else they're doing in secret labs all over the place, there's probably a movie script in all this.
Holy cow! It's the woowoo patrol!

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