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Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy

 
SouthernLight (OP)

User ID: 421424
United States
05/20/2008 03:30 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
I think this is the best thread I've ever seen on GLP!!!! Thanks!
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 436303

hf Awwwww... Thanks :)

I started to post a recipe for Dandelion root "coffee", but this site has an excellent page on it, complete with photos! So...
[link to www.prodigalgardens.info]

Same with this one on fixing fritters...
[link to www.learningherbs.com]
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 421424
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05/21/2008 05:59 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
Another way to save money is to use leftovers.

I'm sure most of us do this already. The costs add up most when there are just small amounts left. One serving is too much to throw away and not enough to do much with, so it often spoils in the back of the fridge. Another problem can be boredom with the same old thing for 3 or 4 days in a row. A key to happy leftovers is making them seem like a totally different dish...

When I purchase a roast, I always get larger than needed. The first night is pot roast with lots of potatoes and veggies cooked in the hot broth once the roast is done. The next day I might shred enough of the meat to make BBQ sandwiches for lunch and enchiladas for the evening meal.

I usually cut the potatoes in halves or large quarters and veggies in large chunks for the first cooking. This makes them more versatile to use in other dishes. I might fish out enough potato to chop, lightly brown and serve as hash browns with the morning eggs or in an egg, cheese and potato burrito. Or they can all be drained and heated in the microwave in a casserole dish. Sprinkle with seasoned breadcrumbs and/or grated hard cheese, then lightly brown in the oven for a new dish entirely.

Another favorite happens when the pot gets low and is put back on the fire to simmer. Once the veggies are all really soft, mash them with a fork to make a thick soup, with or without meat. Toss in any other small serving leftovers within reason too... I have even chopped and added a couple of poorly wrapped, dried out pizza slices! They thickened the soup and gave it a whole new flavor. With a little extra Italian seasoning, Parmesan cheese to taste, a side salad and fresh garlic bread it got rave reviews.

Planned leftovers helps in several ways...
_Initial food costs because larger packages are usually cheaper
_Energy costs because the next servings only have to be reheated
_Subsequent meal prep takes less time and effort when all you want to do is put your feet up after a hard day and
_If there is something good in the fridge that is easy to pick at, everyone is more likely to snack on something besides cookies or other junk, which is beneficial enough to make having to re-think that next meal you had planned okay
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 439046
United States
05/24/2008 06:43 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
some good reminders here.

my grandmother didn't let nothing go to waste! she used pineapple rinds to make a real good summer drink and same with the water from rinsing rice before cooking. wish i could find those recipes now!

when we had watermelon she always pickled the rinds saved all eht seeds from pumpkins too. soaked them in brine and roasted them until the puffed up crispy

even the hair from our brushes got saved to put into the soil of her house plants. she said it was good for them.
SouthernLight (OP)

User ID: 421424
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05/24/2008 11:39 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
some good reminders here.

my grandmother didn't let nothing go to waste! she used pineapple rinds to make a real good summer drink and same with the water from rinsing rice before cooking. wish i could find those recipes now!

when we had watermelon she always pickled the rinds saved all eht seeds from pumpkins too. soaked them in brine and roasted them until the puffed up crispy

even the hair from our brushes got saved to put into the soil of her house plants. she said it was good for them.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 439046


Ohh, the pineapple drink is Tepache! That IS a good summer drink. I didn't have a written recipe, but searched and found a good one on gourmetsleuth.com


Tepache


A beverage popular in Mexico made from slightly fermented pineapple flavored with piloncillo and canela (cinnamon).


I N G R E D I E N T S
1 mature pineapple (around 3 pounds)
12 cups (3 liters) of water
2 3/4 cups (600 grams ) of piloncillo or brown sugar, packed
1 small stick of canela (about 3 inches)
3 cloves

I N S T R U C T I O N S
Wash the pineapple completely, clear the stem and cut the rest in big pieces even with the rind.

Place the pieces of pineapple in a big container and add 8 cups (2 lt.) of water, piloncillo, the cinnamon and the cloves.

Cover and let sit for 48 hours.

Strain the resulting liquid and add the other 4 cups (1 lt.) of water. (Or if you prefer, add 1 cup (1/2 lt.) of ale and let rest another 12 hours.) Strain and add 3 cups (3/4 lt.) of water. Serve cold with ice cubes.

Thank You for the reminder :)
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
SouthernLight (OP)

User ID: 442107
United States
05/29/2008 12:00 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
Free eats and good medicines

This probably deserves its own thread, but it really applies here because so many everyday plants are packed with nutrients and are free supplements to any diet. Local varieties grow readily, without special care or know-how too, so you don't have to be an experienced gardener either.

Why is nutrition so important? If your body is receiving what it needs nutritionally you will not only be healthier, but will actually find yourself eating far less. Those cravings and impulses to “graze” aren’t always simple cases of the munchies or emotional eating binges. They often happen because we are not getting all we need from our modern diet of highly processed foods. Many of the supplements we take, like vitamins, are not readily absorbed or utilized either. Vitamins and trace minerals are at their best when consumed as a part of the food we eat. Most wild forage in its natural habitat will contain more and better nutrients than produce grown in depleted soils laden with chemical fertilizers and pesticides… the way most of our commercially available produce is grown.

I realize I’ve already discussed dandelion, but it bears further detail.

Dandelions (also known as Lion’s Tooth, Priest’s Crown and Swine’s Snout) are the most common plant that we all easily recognize. The young greens, prior to blooming, are good raw. Older greens are best cooked, IMO. The large, oldest leaves get quite bitter, like late season mustard, but aren’t bad cooked and seasoned. The flowers may be eaten raw or breaded and fried as fritters. The root, as previously noted, may be used as a coffee substitute or extender. Mix the coffee grounds with prepared root (see previous post for link to illustrated instructions) at the ratio of 1/3 dandelion to 2/3 coffee grounds. The average coffee drinker won’t notice much difference in flavor, but the savings will be substantial.

This plant is almost a multi-vitamin and extremely valuable in survival situations! Medicinally, dandelion leaves have a mild diuretic action. The root is used like a “bitter” prior to eating, stimulating the appetite and aiding digestion. It also aids liver and gallbladder function, stimulating the bile flow and gallbladder contractions. NOTE! If you have gallbladder problems be sure to check with your doctor before using. Some gallbladder issues can be aggravated with dandelion use.

Another very common and easily identified plant is Lamb’s Quarters. Around here it is also called Fat Hen because the chickens will seek it out when given the chance. It is exceptionally easy to grow, requiring very little care other than attention to keep it from spreading too much. The young leaves are wonderful raw in salads and the stems and leaves are much like chard when cooked. I use them the same way I use spinach... steamed, boiled, stir fried and raw. The seed also work well for sprouts with a deliciously delicate flavor.
Check these links for more information and photos. This is probably one of those “weeds” that drive you nuts in the spring that you could be eating!
[link to foragingpictures.com]
[link to www.illinoiswildflowers.info]
[link to www.veggiegardeningtips.com]
[link to www.kingdomplantae.net]

Nutritionally, they another powerhouse of minerals and vitamins, making them a valuable addition to any diet. Check this link for their amazing
[link to www.nutritiondata.com]

The only medicinal uses I know of are as a poultice of the crushed leaves for burns and sunburn and as a food for preventing malnourishment. It is high in oxalic acid though, so you wouldn’t want to make a steady diet of just lamb’s quarters.
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
SouthernLight (OP)

User ID: 442107
United States
05/29/2008 03:25 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
Continuing with the wild foods aspect of cutting costs while staying healthy...

Let's get into some of the more common regional plants found in the deserts of the Southern United States, Mexico and Central and South Americas… places you might not think very plentiful in wild forage. In some ways this is true, but the useful plants here generally have amazing versatility.

First is Mesquite… one of my favorites.
There are several types of mesquites. It was introduced into Australia as well, where it is considered invasive and steps to control and/or eradicate it are being taken.

This site has some useful information and very good photos for identification purposes.
[link to www.desertusa.com]

Every part of this plant is used in some way. As food, the blossoms and seedpods are most commonly harvested. Nutritionally, it is a good source of fiber, protein, is rich in lysine and contains traces of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron and zinc as well. It was an essential food staple for most of the indigenous peoples living in its native habitats.

The almost ripe pods are a favorite with children. They are sweet and quite a treat right off the tree to chew as a snack. These may also be used to make very tasty, almost a caramel nutty flavor, syrup, though it does take 12 to 15 hours to slowly cook down.

The ripened, dried pods may be crushed whole and the seeds winnowed out to make an exceptionally good meal for adding to breads, soups and many other dishes. Both, casings and seeds or seeds alone, are often ground into fine flour that lends wonderful molasses-like flavor to anything made with it. This flour is now widely available commercially due to this unique flavor and its exceptional nutritional and medicinal properties. Driving this popularity is the beneficial effect it has on type II diabetes. Take a look at a New Mexico State University site for more information on this…
[link to medplant.nmsu.edu]

There are so many medicinal uses for mesquite that it is probably better to refer you to some links with more complete information… It has antacid, antiseptic, antibacterial and antibiotic properties. I have used the pods and gum to treat eye inflammations and the bark or gum, as a tea, for urinary tract infections, sore throat, infected wounds and chapped skin with good effect. The inner bark can also be used as a laxative. The gum is similar to gum Arabic and can be used in much the same way.

[link to medplant.nmsu.edu]
[link to www.foodreference.com]
[link to www.texasbeyondhistory.net]
[link to medplant.nmsu.edu]
[link to www.ranchmagazine.com]
[link to www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

One of probably many sources of mesquite meal for diabetes sufferers, in case you don’t live where it grows…
[link to www.fresh-network.com]
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
SouthernLight (OP)

User ID: 442107
United States
06/01/2008 06:46 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
Continuing wild eating with… Desert forage

Prickly pear cactus
is an old favorite!

The fruit are tasty as is or can be made into jelly or wine or probably expressed as juice alone. With thorns carefully removed, the bright red fruit is a tasty treat and makes for wonderful jellies and even wine. You could probably just express them for juice too. I have never tried this, but it seems reasonable and could prove handy for hydration in a survival situation.

Did you know the pads can be eaten too? Young pads, I like the ones that the thorns have not fully developed on, are quite good prepared in a variety of ways. The first step is to remove the thorny nodules, trim away the fibrous base of the pad and the outer edge. This is best done wearing leather gloves and using a very sharp paring knife.

One of the easiest methods of cooking is to roast or grill these pads over an open fire. It takes about 10 to 15 minutes per side for them to be fully cooked and nicely toasted. You will want to lightly brush them with oil before and during grilling. Bacon grease works well, as does olive oil, plain or seasoned. My grandfather had a special tin of sliced garlic and bacon drippings that he used to brush his, adding salt and pepper as he turned and toasted them to perfection.

They are also good chopped into bite-sized pieces, sautéed until tender and mixed with a variety of things from scrambled eggs to salads. Just use a little butter and season to taste as you are cooking. Another method is to boil them. This is very similar to cooking okra in that they make a thick, slimy liquid, (especially if over cooked) which should be drained and washed off before adding to salads or serving with other vegetables. You can buy prepared prickly pear in most grocery stores as Nopalitos.

Links to fruit nutrition, info and recipes:
[link to www.desertusa.com]
[link to www.nutritiondata.com]
[link to www.cooks.com]
[link to www.gourmetsleuth.com]

Medicinal uses include skinning the pad and placing on burns, insect bites, chapped skin, etc., much the same way aloe vera is used. Studies are also showing value in elevated LDL cholesterol and diabetes. See these links for more:
[link to www.herbalsafety.utep.edu]
[link to jn.nutrition.org]
[link to health.usnews.com]
[link to gateway.nlm.nih.gov]
[link to findarticles.com]
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
paladin

User ID: 463944
United States
07/06/2008 02:36 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
hey all...


we just cooked our corn on the cob this weekend this way..

1- corn with husk intact..

in the micro-wave.....90 sec..

6-corn with husk intact...9-min


after the time is up...wrap them in a dish towel for 5-minutes

the silk and husk just falls off......best damm corn I ever had.....none of the flaver is boiled away..


chorus
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 86532
United States
12/08/2008 09:47 AM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
I posted something once but the ignoramuses ripped me a new asshole - I'll try again. This is a very simple strategy to get twice as many meals out of the same amount of food. It does not magically double the total calories or the total nutrition, i am aware of this, it is strictly to increase the physical volume of your available food to get two meals out of one meal's worth of food. It's very simple.

BOIL everything you buy. Put your vegetables in one pot, and your meat in another. At one meal serve the boiled-out vegetables with a gravy made from the meat broth, and at the next meal serve the boiled-out meat with a bowl or mug of vegetable broth. The idea is that you get the nutrition of both meat and vegetables at each meal. Since you no doubt have cornbread or some side dish with each meal anyway this is no problem to do at all, and it instantly doubles the physical volume of your food. And it works well with your existing strategy. Even you bean freaks can get both soup and beans out of the same pot of beans. It even works with canned beans! And if boiled meat doesn't sound appetizing to you, you can still bake, fry, or bbq it AFTER you boil it out. You could still stir fry the vegetables too. Frying gives everything back their flavor.

Okay, flame away >:-(
SouthernLight (OP)

User ID: 491473
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12/08/2008 12:46 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
I posted something once but the ignoramuses ripped me a new asshole - I'll try again. This is a very simple strategy to get twice as many meals out of the same amount of food. It does not magically double the total calories or the total nutrition, i am aware of this, it is strictly to increase the physical volume of your available food to get two meals out of one meal's worth of food. It's very simple.

BOIL everything you buy. Put your vegetables in one pot, and your meat in another. At one meal serve the boiled-out vegetables with a gravy made from the meat broth, and at the next meal serve the boiled-out meat with a bowl or mug of vegetable broth. The idea is that you get the nutrition of both meat and vegetables at each meal. Since you no doubt have cornbread or some side dish with each meal anyway this is no problem to do at all, and it instantly doubles the physical volume of your food. And it works well with your existing strategy. Even you bean freaks can get both soup and beans out of the same pot of beans. It even works with canned beans! And if boiled meat doesn't sound appetizing to you, you can still bake, fry, or bbq it AFTER you boil it out. You could still stir fry the vegetables too. Frying gives everything back their flavor.

Okay, flame away >:-(
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 86532


No flaming here hon... I imagine many will be learning this lesson.
I've fed lots of people using this basic technique. The only thing I would point out is that you don't need to actually boil all meat... use the bones and trimmings for this. Add a tsp to tbs of apple cider vinegar (does Not flavor the broth) and you will have extracted added calcium too.

I'd like to add more but Must fly... May add to this later.
You just keep on keepin' on Anonymous Coward 86532... You're on the right track.
hf
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 86532
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12/08/2008 02:06 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
I posted something once but the ignoramuses ripped me a new asshole - I'll try again. This is a very simple strategy to get twice as many meals out of the same amount of food. It does not magically double the total calories or the total nutrition, i am aware of this, it is strictly to increase the physical volume of your available food to get two meals out of one meal's worth of food. It's very simple.

BOIL everything you buy. Put your vegetables in one pot, and your meat in another. At one meal serve the boiled-out vegetables with a gravy made from the meat broth, and at the next meal serve the boiled-out meat with a bowl or mug of vegetable broth. The idea is that you get the nutrition of both meat and vegetables at each meal. Since you no doubt have cornbread or some side dish with each meal anyway this is no problem to do at all, and it instantly doubles the physical volume of your food. And it works well with your existing strategy. Even you bean freaks can get both soup and beans out of the same pot of beans. It even works with canned beans! And if boiled meat doesn't sound appetizing to you, you can still bake, fry, or bbq it AFTER you boil it out. You could still stir fry the vegetables too. Frying gives everything back their flavor.

Okay, flame away >:-(


No flaming here hon... I imagine many will be learning this lesson.
I've fed lots of people using this basic technique. The only thing I would point out is that you don't need to actually boil all meat... use the bones and trimmings for this. Add a tsp to tbs of apple cider vinegar (does Not flavor the broth) and you will have extracted added calcium too.

I'd like to add more but Must fly... May add to this later.
You just keep on keepin' on Anonymous Coward 86532... You're on the right track.
hf
 Quoting: SouthernLight


Yes but you see, my way the bones and trimmings constitute ingredients for yet a third meal, and by no means change what i said. I'm not sure why nobody grasps my simple strategy or the point of it.
SouthernLight (OP)

User ID: 491473
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12/12/2008 11:21 AM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
Okay, sorry for the delay in answering but maybe I can address this a little better now...

One of the main issues in a hardship diet is Nutrition, not just bulk. Bulk can be provided by many foods (if you have them) that may provide minimal nutrition on their own... white rice; flour products for thickening or things like bread, gravey and so on. One of the reasons you may be thinking no one "gets it" is the fact that many simply disagree.

40 years of cooking, and some damn fine teachers, has taught me a few ways meet nutritional needs on a very short shoestring and elements of what you propose play an integral part. BOILING OUT Everything is Not the answer though, since many vitamins and minerals can be lessened or destroyed by high or prolonged heat. Boiling can also make many meats stringy and relatively tasteless, making later frying or barbequing unpalatable.
Without going into lengthy specifics, the best way I can 'maybe' show you some alternatives is to provide an example using a recent “meal”...

Day one:
Thick cut 7 Bone Roast… inexpensive, can be tough and had 4 lg. bones
prep: rough cut slabs of meat from bones; place meat slabs in bowl or zip bag with tenderizer, milk, cola or other tenderizing marinade and refrigerate…
First meal
_sear bones w/meat in 2 tbs oil, add onion, garlic & seasoning, lightly brown then add water to cover and bring to low boil (add 1 tbs apple cider vinegar to pull additional calcium from bones; also tenderized meat and sinew) cook until meat comes off bones easily (remove and set bones aside for dogs or to grind up to put in garden or compost)
_add available veggies to broth, bring back to low boil and cook until almost fork tender
_serve with bread or crackers

Second meal
_re-heat and add any compatibly flavored leftovers from fridge, add a little crumbled stale bread or crackers to thicken… or you can mix a little flour in milk or water to achieve a thicker, gravy-like consistency
_add a handful of fresh veggies if you have them, cook until just tender
_serve over rice or biscuits

Third meal if any left over
_mix rice, remaining stew and seasoning to change taste (chili powder, Italian or curry works well usually), along with some flour, lightly sprinkled in layers, in a casserole dish; top with a sprinkle of chopped onion and grated cheese of choice, cover and bake until bubbling, remove cover and brown top

Fourth meal
_by now, meat slabs should be nice and tender, butterfly them, season and pan fry or barbeque on grill
_serve with salad, potato or other veggie and bread

Fifth meal if any left over
_chop or thin slice cooked meat and add to stir fry veggies
_serve over rice

Notes:
If things are really hard and these meals must stretch among many people (small servings leaving most feeling like they could eat more) be sure to leave any fat on the meat. This provides needed fats and extra energy. Also, sopping bread in most used frying oils and/or leftover juices on plates and bowls can provide additional food for pets and chickens.

Keep all vegetable trimmings to cook into a separate broth. These skins, root ends and misc. pieces contain lots of nutrition! They are staples in most broths used in high end, gourmet dishes, believe it or not. This broth can be seasoned and drunk like tea or used to prepare rice or other dishes. The strained out veggies can then be fed to pets or livestock.

Hope this gives you some creative ideas that will provide better nutrition for you using the same ingredients and basic techniques you now use, AC 86532!
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
RHSC
User ID: 570208
United States
01/28/2009 12:50 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
SOUTHERNLIGHT:
Great tips! Food prices are climbing daily, and they're going to get worse. You've shared a lot of good ideas here!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 595696
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01/29/2009 04:01 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
Hey there Red! You aren't just whistling Dixie about the costs! Geez!

I was looking back over these posts and saw a few right here...
Not even one year ago:

5 lb block Am. cheese Then $16 reg. $13 sale Now $21+
canned veggies Then $.60 reg. 3/1.00 sale Now $1 - 1.25 each... some higher
Hellman's mayo Then $2.50 reg $1.50 sale Now $5 - $6+
coffee 2lb Then $8.99 reg $5.99 sale Now 1 lb 11 oz $9.99

If you notice, almost All cereals, coffees, candy bars, many canned goods and even shampoos and such are cutting the volume or weight down so they don't have to raise prices!
A standard can of corn, for instance, used to provide 4 reasonable servings... now? 2 fairly generous or 3 really skimpy ones is all you will get.

I have already started switching the family over to the 'new' diet to get them accustomed to it. The kids will most often balk at changes and whine about not having this or that. By doing it now, we can ease in some of the things they are not as familiar with and I can learn how to combine and season dishes in a way they will accept and like.... Like making frozen koolaid ice tray pops instead of ice cream, mixed bean and pea soups and dishes made from dried goods instead of the frozen, pre-packs or canned (they do cook up a little differently and I must get used to pre-soaking to save on cooking energy). I've always slipped in the wild goods, but now am making a point to present it as a treat and make the foraging an enjoyable adventure.

By the time this is a necessity, the transition shouldn't be such a shock this way.

I appreciate the reminder on this thread! I would like to start or see someone else start one on alternatives to or actually making your own cosmetics and hygiene products as well. There was a thread about soap berries recently... uhmmm, let's see... yep, here it is
Thread: Free Laundry Detergent Experiment with Soap Nuts/ China Berries
some good info here that only scratches the surface!
SouthernLight (OP)

User ID: 595696
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01/29/2009 04:15 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
Oh for goodness sakes... gotta love that timing out thing doncha? lol
“You can't wake a person who is pretending to be asleep”
Navajo proverb
Leoparda_Sanctus

User ID: 633270
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03/12/2009 07:56 AM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
Many pass over collagen. That stuffs for joints no matter how obtained. Boil animal head and hooves to get some. Quite easy.
Brother sun, intuition moon. Home at the forest.

Sure every post I have mentions goat blood...How do you think we get plasma tv's?

Organic needs are being assaulted. I'm not amused by this & encourage all to grow heirloom seed for themselves.

The garden gives greatest power.
Diabetes curing food list [Forget the FDA - Think for yourself]:
Thread: Every item recently recalled by FDA for salmonella has diabetic healing also prostate Big Pharma rids their competition
Anonymous Coward
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01/04/2010 01:16 PM
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Re: Recession Proof GLP... Food: Cut costs & stay healthy
bump

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