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Message Subject Cern Power___Colder than Space
Poster Handle ShadowDancer
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We should have a panel of independent scientists reviewing these experiments before they are conducted -


just in case, but I doubt they will be this prudent - seems to me that we don't understand much at this level and trying to recreate the start of the universe is potentially quite dangerous.

Read more: [link to www.dailymail.co.uk]


[link to www.pbs.org]

Q: While watching the program on the LHC at CERN, I heard that it would generate about 40 million megabytes of data per second! Where and how would they store that much information, and for how many days? This is leading-edge technology for sure!
M. S. Keppler, Houston, Texas

A: Data storage is a huge problem. The experiments do generate about 40 million megabytes of data per second, but the data is very quickly analyzed to see what parts can be left out, and then it is compressed. Then, all the data is stored in large disk farms at CERN and copies are sent to remote sites all over the world for analysis. All the data is kept permanently. The storage is cutting-edge, and the information technology group at CERN is always assessing the latest technologies in both data storage and transmission. However, they are very careful to only use products that have been verified as totally reliable. Everything is commercial; no components are home-built. However, the data-handling system is unique in that it is one of the largest and fastest in the world.


....or this answer: A: Actually, I'm not sure what to expect to happen at the LHC. We could see evidence for new universes or new dimensions, or something we did not expect at all. As far as technology is concerned, just building the accelerator and big detectors have pushed magnet technology ahead a great deal, not to mention computing, microelectronics, and superconductors.

Not feeling all warm and fuzzy...
 
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