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Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 478762
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03/13/2009 09:05 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
That's nothing, check this out:

[link to waterpoweredcar.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 633741

it won't work
Anonymous Coward
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03/15/2009 05:01 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
-------------------------------------------------------------​-------------------

The new Volt uses lithium-ion batteries that can be plugged in to charge and a fuel cell to recharge them on the road, extending its range to 300 miles (480 kilometers), said Lawrence D. Burns, GM's vice president for research.
"We're increasingly confident that these fuel cell vehicles can compete with gasoline vehicles," Burns told reporters.

Fuel cell vehicles run on the power produced when oxygen in the air combines with hydrogen that's stored in the fuel tank — producing only harmless water vapor.

GM has not set a date to start selling such cars but has begun production engineering, a process that can lead to sales within three to four years, he said.

A formal unveiling of the vehicle is scheduled for Friday.

An earlier version of the Volt, shown in January at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, used a gasoline-powered motor to recharge its batteries.

Ford Motor Co. also showed an electric car in January at the Washington Auto Show that can use a gasoline engine or a hydrogen fuel cell to recharge its batteries.

China's Shanghai Automotive Industries Corp. plans to display its own fuel cell-powered sedan at the Shanghai show.

GM plans to produce 100 of its fuel cell cars late this year or in 2008 and distribute them to members of the public in the United States, Europe and Asia for testing, Burns said.

A key challenge for public acceptance of hydrogen-powered cars is the availability of hydrogen at filling stations, Burns said. But he said companies are developing technology to produce hydrogen from natural gas and other sources, and growing anxiety about oil supplies and global warming should increase the appeal of such cars.

"We believe that if we can get the vehicle right, the infrastructure will follow," he said.
300 miles on electric!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous Coward
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03/15/2009 07:47 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
-----------------------------------------------------------​---------------------

The new Volt uses lithium-ion batteries that can be plugged in to charge and a fuel cell to recharge them on the road, extending its range to 300 miles (480 kilometers), said Lawrence D. Burns, GM's vice president for research.
"We're increasingly confident that these fuel cell vehicles can compete with gasoline vehicles," Burns told reporters.

Fuel cell vehicles run on the power produced when oxygen in the air combines with hydrogen that's stored in the fuel tank — producing only harmless water vapor.

GM has not set a date to start selling such cars but has begun production engineering, a process that can lead to sales within three to four years, he said.

A formal unveiling of the vehicle is scheduled for Friday.

An earlier version of the Volt, shown in January at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, used a gasoline-powered motor to recharge its batteries.

Ford Motor Co. also showed an electric car in January at the Washington Auto Show that can use a gasoline engine or a hydrogen fuel cell to recharge its batteries.

China's Shanghai Automotive Industries Corp. plans to display its own fuel cell-powered sedan at the Shanghai show.

GM plans to produce 100 of its fuel cell cars late this year or in 2008 and distribute them to members of the public in the United States, Europe and Asia for testing, Burns said.

A key challenge for public acceptance of hydrogen-powered cars is the availability of hydrogen at filling stations, Burns said. But he said companies are developing technology to produce hydrogen from natural gas and other sources, and growing anxiety about oil supplies and global warming should increase the appeal of such cars.

"We believe that if we can get the vehicle right, the infrastructure will follow," he said.
300 miles on electric!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 635642
I known we had electric car that can go over 200 miles on a charge.300 MILE WE CAN GO ANYWHERE
ALL OF US NEED TO PUSH HARD FOR OUR ELECTRIC CARS
Anonymous Coward
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03/15/2009 09:41 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
I was told electric's can only go 40 to 50 miles on a charge?
Now i'm reading on this post about cars getting up to 300 miles on a charge.
Anonymous Coward
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03/15/2009 10:41 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
I was told electric's can only go 40 to 50 miles on a charge?
Now i'm reading on this post about cars getting up to 300 miles on a charge.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 476798

Ye for a long time we had cars that can get well over 100mpg and over 100 plus mile per charge.
IT LOOKS AS IF THE JANITOR POST HAS OPEN EYES
This post was started with an electric junk bike.
Anonymous Coward
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03/15/2009 10:49 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
With gas prices going through the roof and regulators requiring cars to be ever more miserly, Volkswagen is bringing new meaning to the term "fuel efficiency" with a bullet-shaped microcar that gets a stunning 282 235 mpg.

Volkswagen's had its super-thrifty One-Liter Car concept vehicle -- so named because that's how much fuel it needs to go 100 kilometers -- stashed away for six years. The body's made of carbon fiber to minimize weight (the entire car weighs just 660 pounds) and company execs didn't expect the material to become cheap enough to produce the car until 2012.

But VW's decided to build the car two years ahead of schedule.

According to Britain's Car magazine, VW has approved a plan to build a limited number of One-Liters in 2010.
They'll probably be built in the company's prototype shop, which has the capacity to build as many as 1,000 per year. That's not a lot, but it's enough to help VW get a lot of attention while showing how much light weight and an efficient engine can achieve.

VW unveiled the slick two-seater concept six years ago at a stockholder's meeting in Hamburg. To prove it was a real car, Chairman Ferdinand Piech personally drove it from Wolfsburg to Hamburg. At the time, he said the car could see production when the cost of its carbon monocoque dropped from 35,000 Euros (about $55,000) to 5,000 Euros (about $8,000) -- something he figured would happen in 2012. With carbon fiber being used in everything from airliners to laptops these days, VW's apparently decided the cost is competitive enough to build at least a few hundred One-Liters.

VW's engineers -- who spent three years developing the car -- made extensive use of magnesium, titanium and aluminum to bring it in at less than one-third the weight of a Toyota Echo. According to Canadian Driver, the front suspension assembly weighs just 18 pounds. The six-speed transmission features a magnesium case, titanium bolts and hollow gears; it weighs a tad more than 50 pounds. The 16-inch wheels are carbon fiber. The magnesium steering wheel weighs a little more than a pound. How much of the concept car's exotic hardware makes it to the production model remains to be seen.

Low weight only gets you so far in the quest for ultimate fuel economy; aerodynamics plays a big role. The One-Liter is long and low, coming in at 11.4 feet long, 4.1 feet wide and 3.3 feet tall. It features an aircraft-like canopy, flat wheel covers and a belly pan to smooth the airflow under the car. The engine cooling vents open only when needed, and video cameras take the place of mirrors. The passenger sits behind the driver to keep the car narrow. The car has a coefficient of drag of 0.16
; the average car comes in around 0.30 and the Honda Insight had a Cd of 0.25.

As for the engine, the concept had a one-cylinder diesel engine producing 8.5 horsepower and 13.5 foot-pounds of torque. Car says the production model will use a two-cylinder turbodiesel for a little more oomph. Doubling the number of cylinders is sure to cut fuel economy, so VW may install a diesel-hybrid drivetrain. The engine turns off at stop lights to save fuel, then automatically restarts when the driver depresses the accelerator pedal.

(Update: The car reportedly has anti-lock brakes, stability control and airbags. According to Canadian Driver, "Volkswagen says the One-Liter Car is as safe as a GT sports car registered for racing. With the aid of computer crash simulations, the car was designed with built-in crash tubes, pressure sensors for airbag control and front crumple zones.")

What's it gonna cost? Car quotes "one well-placed insider" who says the One-Liter could have a sticker price of anywhere from 20,000 to 30,000 Euros (about $31,750 to $47,622). That's a lot of money. But then, the One-Liter, despite its diminutive size, is a lot of car.
ALL I CAN SAY IS WOW
Anonymous Coward
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03/15/2009 11:24 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Carlsbad (CA) - Today, a California car maker named Aptera Motors officially took the wraps off of two new car models which offer crazy fuel economy. The first model will arrive in Q4 2008 as an all-electric vehicle with a maximum range of 120 miles priced below $30,000. A true fuel-electric hybrid model will follow in 2009. Early tests indicate the hybrid model achieves 300 miles per gallon, making an affordable gas sipper within budget for many American families.

We have 300mpg now!
Anonymous Coward
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03/15/2009 11:52 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Carlsbad (CA) - Today, a California car maker named Aptera Motors officially took the wraps off of two new car models which offer crazy fuel economy. The first model will arrive in Q4 2008 as an all-electric vehicle with a maximum range of 120 miles priced below $30,000. A true fuel-electric hybrid model will follow in 2009. Early tests indicate the hybrid model achieves 300 miles per gallon, making an affordable gas sipper within budget for many American families.

We have 300mpg now!
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 482505

Funny how this information is getting out.
Anonymous Coward
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03/16/2009 12:16 AM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
With gas prices going through the roof and regulators requiring cars to be ever more miserly, Volkswagen is bringing new meaning to the term "fuel efficiency" with a bullet-shaped microcar that gets a stunning 282 235 mpg.

Volkswagen's had its super-thrifty One-Liter Car concept vehicle -- so named because that's how much fuel it needs to go 100 kilometers -- stashed away for six years. The body's made of carbon fiber to minimize weight (the entire car weighs just 660 pounds) and company execs didn't expect the material to become cheap enough to produce the car until 2012.

But VW's decided to build the car two years ahead of schedule.

According to Britain's Car magazine, VW has approved a plan to build a limited number of One-Liters in 2010.
They'll probably be built in the company's prototype shop, which has the capacity to build as many as 1,000 per year. That's not a lot, but it's enough to help VW get a lot of attention while showing how much light weight and an efficient engine can achieve.

VW unveiled the slick two-seater concept six years ago at a stockholder's meeting in Hamburg. To prove it was a real car, Chairman Ferdinand Piech personally drove it from Wolfsburg to Hamburg. At the time, he said the car could see production when the cost of its carbon monocoque dropped from 35,000 Euros (about $55,000) to 5,000 Euros (about $8,000) -- something he figured would happen in 2012. With carbon fiber being used in everything from airliners to laptops these days, VW's apparently decided the cost is competitive enough to build at least a few hundred One-Liters.

VW's engineers -- who spent three years developing the car -- made extensive use of magnesium, titanium and aluminum to bring it in at less than one-third the weight of a Toyota Echo. According to Canadian Driver, the front suspension assembly weighs just 18 pounds. The six-speed transmission features a magnesium case, titanium bolts and hollow gears; it weighs a tad more than 50 pounds. The 16-inch wheels are carbon fiber. The magnesium steering wheel weighs a little more than a pound. How much of the concept car's exotic hardware makes it to the production model remains to be seen.

Low weight only gets you so far in the quest for ultimate fuel economy; aerodynamics plays a big role. The One-Liter is long and low, coming in at 11.4 feet long, 4.1 feet wide and 3.3 feet tall. It features an aircraft-like canopy, flat wheel covers and a belly pan to smooth the airflow under the car. The engine cooling vents open only when needed, and video cameras take the place of mirrors. The passenger sits behind the driver to keep the car narrow. The car has a coefficient of drag of 0.16
; the average car comes in around 0.30 and the Honda Insight had a Cd of 0.25.

As for the engine, the concept had a one-cylinder diesel engine producing 8.5 horsepower and 13.5 foot-pounds of torque. Car says the production model will use a two-cylinder turbodiesel for a little more oomph. Doubling the number of cylinders is sure to cut fuel economy, so VW may install a diesel-hybrid drivetrain. The engine turns off at stop lights to save fuel, then automatically restarts when the driver depresses the accelerator pedal.

(Update: The car reportedly has anti-lock brakes, stability control and airbags. According to Canadian Driver, "Volkswagen says the One-Liter Car is as safe as a GT sports car registered for racing. With the aid of computer crash simulations, the car was designed with built-in crash tubes, pressure sensors for airbag control and front crumple zones.")

What's it gonna cost? Car quotes "one well-placed insider" who says the One-Liter could have a sticker price of anywhere from 20,000 to 30,000 Euros (about $31,750 to $47,622). That's a lot of money. But then, the One-Liter, despite its diminutive size, is a lot of car.
ALL I CAN SAY IS WOW
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 479989

Will this pass as a car or motorcycle?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 498997
United States
03/16/2009 12:20 AM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
With gas prices going through the roof and regulators requiring cars to be ever more miserly, Volkswagen is bringing new meaning to the term "fuel efficiency" with a bullet-shaped microcar that gets a stunning 282 235 mpg.

Volkswagen's had its super-thrifty One-Liter Car concept vehicle -- so named because that's how much fuel it needs to go 100 kilometers -- stashed away for six years. The body's made of carbon fiber to minimize weight (the entire car weighs just 660 pounds) and company execs didn't expect the material to become cheap enough to produce the car until 2012.

But VW's decided to build the car two years ahead of schedule.

According to Britain's Car magazine, VW has approved a plan to build a limited number of One-Liters in 2010.
They'll probably be built in the company's prototype shop, which has the capacity to build as many as 1,000 per year. That's not a lot, but it's enough to help VW get a lot of attention while showing how much light weight and an efficient engine can achieve.

VW unveiled the slick two-seater concept six years ago at a stockholder's meeting in Hamburg. To prove it was a real car, Chairman Ferdinand Piech personally drove it from Wolfsburg to Hamburg. At the time, he said the car could see production when the cost of its carbon monocoque dropped from 35,000 Euros (about $55,000) to 5,000 Euros (about $8,000) -- something he figured would happen in 2012. With carbon fiber being used in everything from airliners to laptops these days, VW's apparently decided the cost is competitive enough to build at least a few hundred One-Liters.

VW's engineers -- who spent three years developing the car -- made extensive use of magnesium, titanium and aluminum to bring it in at less than one-third the weight of a Toyota Echo. According to Canadian Driver, the front suspension assembly weighs just 18 pounds. The six-speed transmission features a magnesium case, titanium bolts and hollow gears; it weighs a tad more than 50 pounds. The 16-inch wheels are carbon fiber. The magnesium steering wheel weighs a little more than a pound. How much of the concept car's exotic hardware makes it to the production model remains to be seen.

Low weight only gets you so far in the quest for ultimate fuel economy; aerodynamics plays a big role. The One-Liter is long and low, coming in at 11.4 feet long, 4.1 feet wide and 3.3 feet tall. It features an aircraft-like canopy, flat wheel covers and a belly pan to smooth the airflow under the car. The engine cooling vents open only when needed, and video cameras take the place of mirrors. The passenger sits behind the driver to keep the car narrow. The car has a coefficient of drag of 0.16
; the average car comes in around 0.30 and the Honda Insight had a Cd of 0.25.

As for the engine, the concept had a one-cylinder diesel engine producing 8.5 horsepower and 13.5 foot-pounds of torque. Car says the production model will use a two-cylinder turbodiesel for a little more oomph. Doubling the number of cylinders is sure to cut fuel economy, so VW may install a diesel-hybrid drivetrain. The engine turns off at stop lights to save fuel, then automatically restarts when the driver depresses the accelerator pedal.

(Update: The car reportedly has anti-lock brakes, stability control and airbags. According to Canadian Driver, "Volkswagen says the One-Liter Car is as safe as a GT sports car registered for racing. With the aid of computer crash simulations, the car was designed with built-in crash tubes, pressure sensors for airbag control and front crumple zones.")

What's it gonna cost? Car quotes "one well-placed insider" who says the One-Liter could have a sticker price of anywhere from 20,000 to 30,000 Euros (about $31,750 to $47,622). That's a lot of money. But then, the One-Liter, despite its diminutive size, is a lot of car.
ALL I CAN SAY IS WOW
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 479989

Is this real?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 483757
United States
03/16/2009 04:16 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
With gas prices going through the roof and regulators requiring cars to be ever more miserly, Volkswagen is bringing new meaning to the term "fuel efficiency" with a bullet-shaped microcar that gets a stunning 282 235 mpg.

Volkswagen's had its super-thrifty One-Liter Car concept vehicle -- so named because that's how much fuel it needs to go 100 kilometers -- stashed away for six years. The body's made of carbon fiber to minimize weight (the entire car weighs just 660 pounds) and company execs didn't expect the material to become cheap enough to produce the car until 2012.

But VW's decided to build the car two years ahead of schedule.

According to Britain's Car magazine, VW has approved a plan to build a limited number of One-Liters in 2010.
They'll probably be built in the company's prototype shop, which has the capacity to build as many as 1,000 per year. That's not a lot, but it's enough to help VW get a lot of attention while showing how much light weight and an efficient engine can achieve.

VW unveiled the slick two-seater concept six years ago at a stockholder's meeting in Hamburg. To prove it was a real car, Chairman Ferdinand Piech personally drove it from Wolfsburg to Hamburg. At the time, he said the car could see production when the cost of its carbon monocoque dropped from 35,000 Euros (about $55,000) to 5,000 Euros (about $8,000) -- something he figured would happen in 2012. With carbon fiber being used in everything from airliners to laptops these days, VW's apparently decided the cost is competitive enough to build at least a few hundred One-Liters.

VW's engineers -- who spent three years developing the car -- made extensive use of magnesium, titanium and aluminum to bring it in at less than one-third the weight of a Toyota Echo. According to Canadian Driver, the front suspension assembly weighs just 18 pounds. The six-speed transmission features a magnesium case, titanium bolts and hollow gears; it weighs a tad more than 50 pounds. The 16-inch wheels are carbon fiber. The magnesium steering wheel weighs a little more than a pound. How much of the concept car's exotic hardware makes it to the production model remains to be seen.

Low weight only gets you so far in the quest for ultimate fuel economy; aerodynamics plays a big role. The One-Liter is long and low, coming in at 11.4 feet long, 4.1 feet wide and 3.3 feet tall. It features an aircraft-like canopy, flat wheel covers and a belly pan to smooth the airflow under the car. The engine cooling vents open only when needed, and video cameras take the place of mirrors. The passenger sits behind the driver to keep the car narrow. The car has a coefficient of drag of 0.16
; the average car comes in around 0.30 and the Honda Insight had a Cd of 0.25.

As for the engine, the concept had a one-cylinder diesel engine producing 8.5 horsepower and 13.5 foot-pounds of torque. Car says the production model will use a two-cylinder turbodiesel for a little more oomph. Doubling the number of cylinders is sure to cut fuel economy, so VW may install a diesel-hybrid drivetrain. The engine turns off at stop lights to save fuel, then automatically restarts when the driver depresses the accelerator pedal.

(Update: The car reportedly has anti-lock brakes, stability control and airbags. According to Canadian Driver, "Volkswagen says the One-Liter Car is as safe as a GT sports car registered for racing. With the aid of computer crash simulations, the car was designed with built-in crash tubes, pressure sensors for airbag control and front crumple zones.")

What's it gonna cost? Car quotes "one well-placed insider" who says the One-Liter could have a sticker price of anywhere from 20,000 to 30,000 Euros (about $31,750 to $47,622). That's a lot of money. But then, the One-Liter, despite its diminutive size, is a lot of car.
ALL I CAN SAY IS WOW

Is this real?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 498997

Yes this is REAL
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 635745
United States
03/16/2009 07:34 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Anyway Oil won't last long so we will need electric cars very soon.
Anonymous Coward
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03/16/2009 08:12 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Forget about GAS,OIL or ELECTRIC and the JANITOR
This car run on AIR


The Air Car caused a huge stir when we reported last year that Tata Motors would begin producing it in India. Now the little gas-free ride that could is headed Stateside in a big-time way.

Zero Pollution Motors (ZPM) confirmed to PopularMechanics.com on Thursday that it expects to produce the world’s first air-powered car for the United States by late 2009 or early 2010. As the U.S. licensee for Luxembourg-based MDI, which developed the Air Car as a compression-based alternative to the internal combustion engine, ZPM has attained rights to build the first of several modular plants, which are likely to begin manufacturing in the Northeast and grow for regional production around the country, at a clip of up to 10,000 Air Cars per year.

And while ZPM is also licensed to build MDI’s two-seater OneCAT economy model (the one headed for India) and three-seat MiniCAT (like a SmartForTwo without the gas), the New Paltz, N.Y., startup is aiming bigger: Company officials want to make the first air-powered car to hit U.S. roads a $17,800, 75-hp equivalent, six-seat modified version of MDI’s CityCAT (pictured above) that, thanks to an even more radical engine, is said to travel as far as 1000 miles at up to 96 mph with each tiny fill-up.

We’ll believe that when we drive it, but MDI’s new dual-energy engine—currently being installed in models at MDI facilities overseas—is still pretty damn cool in concept. After using compressed air fed from the same Airbus-built tanks in earlier models to run its pistons, the next-gen Air Car has a supplemental energy source to kick in north of 35 mph, ZPM says. A custom heating chamber heats the air in a process officials refused to elaborate upon, though they insisted it would increase volume and thus the car’s range and speed.

“I want to stress that these are estimates, and that we’ll know soon more precisely from our engineers,” ZPM spokesman Kevin Haydon told PM, “but a vehicle with one tank of air and, say, 8 gal. of either conventional petrol, ethanol or biofuel could hit between 800 and 1000 miles.”

Those figures would make the Air Car, along with Aptera’s Typ-1 and Tesla’s Roadster, a favorite among early entrants for the Automotive X Prize, for which MDI and ZPM have already signed up. But with the family-size, four-door CityCAT undergoing standard safety tests in Europe, then side-impact tests once it arrives in the States, could it be the first 100-mpg, nonelectric car you can actually buy?
Anonymous Coward
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03/16/2009 08:34 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Forget about GAS,OIL or ELECTRIC and the JANITOR
This car run on AIR


The Air Car caused a huge stir when we reported last year that Tata Motors would begin producing it in India. Now the little gas-free ride that could is headed Stateside in a big-time way.

Zero Pollution Motors (ZPM) confirmed to PopularMechanics.com on Thursday that it expects to produce the world’s first air-powered car for the United States by late 2009 or early 2010. As the U.S. licensee for Luxembourg-based MDI, which developed the Air Car as a compression-based alternative to the internal combustion engine, ZPM has attained rights to build the first of several modular plants, which are likely to begin manufacturing in the Northeast and grow for regional production around the country, at a clip of up to 10,000 Air Cars per year.

And while ZPM is also licensed to build MDI’s two-seater OneCAT economy model (the one headed for India) and three-seat MiniCAT (like a SmartForTwo without the gas), the New Paltz, N.Y., startup is aiming bigger: Company officials want to make the first air-powered car to hit U.S. roads a $17,800, 75-hp equivalent, six-seat modified version of MDI’s CityCAT (pictured above) that, thanks to an even more radical engine, is said to travel as far as 1000 miles at up to 96 mph with each tiny fill-up.

We’ll believe that when we drive it, but MDI’s new dual-energy engine—currently being installed in models at MDI facilities overseas—is still pretty damn cool in concept. After using compressed air fed from the same Airbus-built tanks in earlier models to run its pistons, the next-gen Air Car has a supplemental energy source to kick in north of 35 mph, ZPM says. A custom heating chamber heats the air in a process officials refused to elaborate upon, though they insisted it would increase volume and thus the car’s range and speed.

“I want to stress that these are estimates, and that we’ll know soon more precisely from our engineers,” ZPM spokesman Kevin Haydon told PM, “but a vehicle with one tank of air and, say, 8 gal. of either conventional petrol, ethanol or biofuel could hit between 800 and 1000 miles.”

Those figures would make the Air Car, along with Aptera’s Typ-1 and Tesla’s Roadster, a favorite among early entrants for the Automotive X Prize, for which MDI and ZPM have already signed up. But with the family-size, four-door CityCAT undergoing standard safety tests in Europe, then side-impact tests once it arrives in the States, could it be the first 100-mpg, nonelectric car you can actually buy?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 476798

WOW!
Anonymous Coward
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03/16/2009 10:16 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Ok we have cars that run on electric,gas,oil,steam,now air.
Whats is next!
Why, are we still using so much oil and gas?
Anonymous Coward
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03/16/2009 10:24 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
KOLR, of Springfield, Missouri, reported on Daren Luedtke's new electric car, which runs for 150 miles on lead-acid batteries. Luedtke claims it would run for 500 miles on lithium ion batteries. Luedtke showed off a van and a motorcycle powered by his electric drive system at the Ozark International Raceway on October 1. The video and accompanying article are short on technical details, merely describing two electric propulsion systems developed by Luedtke as an "electromagnetic transmission" and a "variable speed belt-driven transmission." Both propulsion systems are being marketed to automakers by Luedtke's company, LEI Global.

Watching the video, we were a little skeptical about this system. It's remarkably noisy for an electric drive and also has a big wheel that spins even when the van isn't in motion. This big, spinning wheel would seem to use energy while the van is stationary, decreasing its potential range. Still, maybe Luedtke has discovered some way to use electricity more efficiently, rather than sending it straight to a drive motor from the batteries.
F+

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03/16/2009 10:28 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
GAY, FUCKING GAY, GO AWAY, FUCKING GAY.
F+

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03/16/2009 10:45 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Seriuosly, you couldn't drag my dead fucking body behind that fucking thing.
Anonymous Coward
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03/17/2009 11:33 AM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Seriuosly, you couldn't drag my dead fucking body behind that fucking thing.
 Quoting: F+

You are what, you are.
No one needs to tell ya that.
Anonymous Coward
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03/17/2009 11:34 AM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
GAY, FUCKING GAY, GO AWAY, FUCKING GAY.
 Quoting: F+

Why don't you just go away.
Anonymous Coward
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03/17/2009 11:36 AM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
As the fight for the White House turned into an all-out energy policy battle this summer, both Senators John McCain and Barack Obama have thrown their weight (inflated tires aside) behind plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). While Detroit and Japan race to deliver mainstream electric cars to market for fleet sales as soon as early 2010, Obama has called for 1 million PHEVs on American roads by the year 2015, on the heels of McCain's initiative to jump-start research for the vehicles' batteries.

"Both candidates have been actively approaching us," says Greg Martin, a spokesperson for General Motors, whose Saturn Vue plug-in and much-hyped Chevy Volt extended-range electric vehicle are expected by late 2010. "They've been very good at reaching out and wanting to come see us, and we've welcomed them in."

Experts charting the research already under way, however, tell PM that the candidates' headline-grabbing proposals—as well as more under-the-radar incentives for ownership and production of emissions-free cars—are from certain to guarantee success for struggling automakers. As even hopeful insiders call their pre-convention policies only "part of a broader challenge" and "aggressive," here's how McCain and Obama stack up on three frontiers for the future of plug-ins:


Better Batteries for Plug-in Production
The biggest stumbling block keeping plug-in hybrids off the road thus far has been their batteries, which today are still too heavy, too inefficient and too expensive, industry insiders say, to find their way into mass production. v "I think there are problems manufacturers have had in the past with technologies that don't provide consumers with the same durability or reliability that they're used to, and that can do long-term damage," says Charles Territo, a spokesperson for the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, an industry group that represents 10 major auto companies, including Chrysler, Ford and GM. As things stand today, automakers seem wary of offering 10-year warranties on cars whose batteries might not last five. (GM said earlier this month it was working hard to guarantee the 10-year deal.)

As gas prices became a key issue this summer, McCain and Obama pledged money to help spur the research and development of next-gen batteries. Moving beyond an initial proposal that called for investment in "lightweight materials and new engines," Obama offered up a $10 billion venture capital fund in mid-May—part of which would be used to "help American companies build batteries for plug-in hybrid vehicles so we don't have to buy them from abroad." Clean-tech start-ups, not surprisingly, showed initial enthusiasm for the fund, though Obama has done little to elaborate on the specific breakdown of its automotive arm. "This government-backed fund will help solve this problem [of outsourcing]," he told a crowd in Warren, Mich., this May, "by creating an initiative right here in Michigan that will accelerate the development and deployment of cutting-edge vehicle technologies."

In late June, McCain proposed a much talked about $300 million prize for the invention of a battery with the "size, capacity, cost and power to leapfrog the commercially available plug-in hybrids or electric cars." Several Democrats immediately spoke out against the proposal, but even coordinators of the $10 million Automotive X Prize did a double take. "Creating a new battery is only part of a broader challenge to solve our country's energy crisis and dependence on foreign oil," AXP executive director Don Foley said in a statement.

Just last week, top lithium-ion battery maker Johnson Controls-Saft complained about the allotment of government funding for automotive research—even as it received an $8.2 million contract for just that. With such mammoth marketplace incentives already in place, it's possible, says Dave Cole, chairman of the Center for Automotive Research, that no amount of government money will speed development of a technology already so hotly pursued. "This is such a lucrative area—whoever wins this competition in the marketplace is going to be worth a lot more than a few hundred million dollars," he says.


Tax Rebates for Clean Driving
"It's really the same principle that's behind a tax credit for energy-efficient windows in your home," says GM's Martin. "Considering the cost of the initial technology, consumer tax incentives help consumers get the price equation a little bit better."

Tax credits work by offsetting part of the cost of new plug-in hybrids on the following year's taxes, effectively lowering sticker prices to nudge early adopters behind the wheel. Similar tax breaks for standard hybrid vehicles are already on the books—a new Ford Escape 2WD Hybrid bought this year, for instance, is eligible for a $3000 credit. But those credits phase out once a manufacturer sells over 60,000 eligible vehicles, as Toyota did from late 2006 through the fall of 2007, largely thanks to the new Prius, which will be fleet tested as a plug-in as soon as next fall.

McCain has pledged a $5000 tax credit for any zero-emission vehicles, with less money on a sliding scale for reduced emitters, like plug-in hybrids. Obama proposes a $7000 credit for advanced-technology vehicles, plug-ins included.


Cheap Loans for Struggling Carmakers
The global credit crisis means money is tight for an American automobile industry that is in the midst of one of its worst slumps in over a decade—sales plunged 18.3 percent in June from a year before. One Obama energy proposal would provide $4 billion in loans and loan guarantees to help American automakers retool manufacturing lines for tomorrow's alternative vehicles, a measure McCain has opposed, stating his worry that such support might force change on Detroit from Washington.

Chrysler, Ford and GM recently lobbied the federal government for 10 times that amount—up to $40 billion. One prominent analysis puts a 95-percent chance on one of the Detroit Three defaulting on loans already owed, so it's unlikely any of the carmakers would be able to obtain anything close to those sums privately—money that's sorely needed if American cars are to compete with well-entrenched foreign hybrid producers like Toyota and Honda. "Even if we knew all the answers right now, the investment required is really quite substantial," Cole says.

If American automakers were amply funded, Cole says, it's unlikely that they would be able to fulfill Obama's recently set goal of 1 million plug-ins by 2015. "It took roughly seven years from the time hybrids were introduced for them to sell a cumulative total of 1 million worldwide," Territo adds. "Taking into account that currently there are no plug-in hybrids—and that they aren't expected to be available until sometime in 2010—a million plug-in hybrids by 2015 appears to be aggressive."
Now we are working on it
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As the fight for the White House turned into an all-out energy policy battle this summer, both Senators John McCain and Barack Obama have thrown their weight (inflated tires aside) behind plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). While Detroit and Japan race to deliver mainstream electric cars to market for fleet sales as soon as early 2010, Obama has called for 1 million PHEVs on American roads by the year 2015, on the heels of McCain's initiative to jump-start research for the vehicles' batteries.

"Both candidates have been actively approaching us," says Greg Martin, a spokesperson for General Motors, whose Saturn Vue plug-in and much-hyped Chevy Volt extended-range electric vehicle are expected by late 2010. "They've been very good at reaching out and wanting to come see us, and we've welcomed them in."

Experts charting the research already under way, however, tell PM that the candidates' headline-grabbing proposals—as well as more under-the-radar incentives for ownership and production of emissions-free cars—are from certain to guarantee success for struggling automakers. As even hopeful insiders call their pre-convention policies only "part of a broader challenge" and "aggressive," here's how McCain and Obama stack up on three frontiers for the future of plug-ins:


Better Batteries for Plug-in Production
The biggest stumbling block keeping plug-in hybrids off the road thus far has been their batteries, which today are still too heavy, too inefficient and too expensive, industry insiders say, to find their way into mass production. v "I think there are problems manufacturers have had in the past with technologies that don't provide consumers with the same durability or reliability that they're used to, and that can do long-term damage," says Charles Territo, a spokesperson for the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, an industry group that represents 10 major auto companies, including Chrysler, Ford and GM. As things stand today, automakers seem wary of offering 10-year warranties on cars whose batteries might not last five. (GM said earlier this month it was working hard to guarantee the 10-year deal.)

As gas prices became a key issue this summer, McCain and Obama pledged money to help spur the research and development of next-gen batteries. Moving beyond an initial proposal that called for investment in "lightweight materials and new engines," Obama offered up a $10 billion venture capital fund in mid-May—part of which would be used to "help American companies build batteries for plug-in hybrid vehicles so we don't have to buy them from abroad." Clean-tech start-ups, not surprisingly, showed initial enthusiasm for the fund, though Obama has done little to elaborate on the specific breakdown of its automotive arm. "This government-backed fund will help solve this problem [of outsourcing]," he told a crowd in Warren, Mich., this May, "by creating an initiative right here in Michigan that will accelerate the development and deployment of cutting-edge vehicle technologies."

In late June, McCain proposed a much talked about $300 million prize for the invention of a battery with the "size, capacity, cost and power to leapfrog the commercially available plug-in hybrids or electric cars." Several Democrats immediately spoke out against the proposal, but even coordinators of the $10 million Automotive X Prize did a double take. "Creating a new battery is only part of a broader challenge to solve our country's energy crisis and dependence on foreign oil," AXP executive director Don Foley said in a statement.

Just last week, top lithium-ion battery maker Johnson Controls-Saft complained about the allotment of government funding for automotive research—even as it received an $8.2 million contract for just that. With such mammoth marketplace incentives already in place, it's possible, says Dave Cole, chairman of the Center for Automotive Research, that no amount of government money will speed development of a technology already so hotly pursued. "This is such a lucrative area—whoever wins this competition in the marketplace is going to be worth a lot more than a few hundred million dollars," he says.


Tax Rebates for Clean Driving
"It's really the same principle that's behind a tax credit for energy-efficient windows in your home," says GM's Martin. "Considering the cost of the initial technology, consumer tax incentives help consumers get the price equation a little bit better."

Tax credits work by offsetting part of the cost of new plug-in hybrids on the following year's taxes, effectively lowering sticker prices to nudge early adopters behind the wheel. Similar tax breaks for standard hybrid vehicles are already on the books—a new Ford Escape 2WD Hybrid bought this year, for instance, is eligible for a $3000 credit. But those credits phase out once a manufacturer sells over 60,000 eligible vehicles, as Toyota did from late 2006 through the fall of 2007, largely thanks to the new Prius, which will be fleet tested as a plug-in as soon as next fall.

McCain has pledged a $5000 tax credit for any zero-emission vehicles, with less money on a sliding scale for reduced emitters, like plug-in hybrids. Obama proposes a $7000 credit for advanced-technology vehicles, plug-ins included.


Cheap Loans for Struggling Carmakers
The global credit crisis means money is tight for an American automobile industry that is in the midst of one of its worst slumps in over a decade—sales plunged 18.3 percent in June from a year before. One Obama energy proposal would provide $4 billion in loans and loan guarantees to help American automakers retool manufacturing lines for tomorrow's alternative vehicles, a measure McCain has opposed, stating his worry that such support might force change on Detroit from Washington.

Chrysler, Ford and GM recently lobbied the federal government for 10 times that amount—up to $40 billion. One prominent analysis puts a 95-percent chance on one of the Detroit Three defaulting on loans already owed, so it's unlikely any of the carmakers would be able to obtain anything close to those sums privately—money that's sorely needed if American cars are to compete with well-entrenched foreign hybrid producers like Toyota and Honda. "Even if we knew all the answers right now, the investment required is really quite substantial," Cole says.

If American automakers were amply funded, Cole says, it's unlikely that they would be able to fulfill Obama's recently set goal of 1 million plug-ins by 2015. "It took roughly seven years from the time hybrids were introduced for them to sell a cumulative total of 1 million worldwide," Territo adds. "Taking into account that currently there are no plug-in hybrids—and that they aren't expected to be available until sometime in 2010—a million plug-in hybrids by 2015 appears to be aggressive."
Now we are working on it
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 496382
Most hybrids are less than 60 mpg that is not good.
We need 100mpg and up.
Anonymous Coward
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03/17/2009 07:32 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
mE AGAIN: THIS IS A MUST READ.
A new version of lithium battery technology can either provide a higher storage density than current batteries, or can charge and discharge as fast as a supercapacitor, emptying its entire charge in under 10 seconds.

It's getting difficult to overstate the importance of battery technology. Compact, high-capacity batteries are an essential part of portable electronics already, but improved batteries are likely to play a key role in the auto industry, and may eventually appear throughout the electric grid, smoothing over interruptions in renewable power sources. Unfortunately, battery technology often involves a series of tradeoffs among factors like capacity, charging time, and usable cycles. Today's issue of Nature reports on a new version of lithium battery technology that may just be a game-changer.

The new work involves well-understood technology, relying on lithium ions as charge carriers within the battery. But the lithium resides in a material that was designed specifically to allow it to move through the battery quickly, which means charges can be shifted in and out of storage much more rapidly than in traditional formulations of lithium batteries. The net result is a battery that, given the proper electrodes, can perform a complete discharge in under 10 seconds—the sort of performance previously confined to the realm of supercapacitors.

This appears to be one of those cases where applications badly lagged theory. Since lithium ions are the primary charge carriers in most batteries, the rates of charging and discharging the batteries wind up proportional to the speed at which lithium ions can move within the battery material. Real-world battery experience would suggest that lithium moves fairly slowly through most types of batteries, but theoretical calculations suggested that there was no real reason that should be the case—lithium should be able to move quite briskly.

A number of recent papers suggested that, in at least one lithium battery class (based on LiFePO4), the problem wasn't the speed at which lithium moved—instead, it could only enter and exit crystals of this salt at specific locations. This, in turn, indicated that figuring a way to speed up this process would increase the overall performance of the battery.

To accomplish this, the authors developed a process that created a disorganized lithium phosphate coating on the surfaces of LiFePO4 crystals. By tweaking the ratio of iron to phosphorous in the starting mix and heating the material to 600°C under argon for ten hours, the authors created a material that has a glass-like coating that's less than 5nm thick, which covers the surface of pellets that are approximately 50nm across. That outer coating has very high lithium mobility, which allows charge to rapidly move into and out of storage in the LiFePO4 of the core of these pellets. In short, because lithium can move quickly through this outer coating, it can rapidly locate and enter the appropriate space on the LiFePO4 crystals.

The results are pretty astonishing. At low discharge rates, a cell prepared from this material discharges completely to its theoretical limit (~166mAh/g). As the authors put it, "Capacity retention of the material is superior." Running it through 50 charge/discharge cycles revealed no significant change in the total capacity of the battery.

But the truly surprising features of the cell came when the authors tweaked the cathode to allow higher currents to be run into the cell. Going from a rate of 2 Coulombs to 200 dropped the total capacity down to about 110mAh/g, but increased the power rate by two orders of magnitude (that's a hundred-fold increase) compared to traditional lithium batteries. Amazingly, under these conditions, the charge capacity of the battery actually increased as it underwent more charge/discharge cycles. Doubling the charge transport to 400C cut the capacity in half, but again doubled the power rate. At the 400C rate, the entire battery would discharge in as little as nine seconds. That sort of performance had previously only been achieved using supercapacitors.

At this point, the authors calculate, the primary limiting factor is no longer storing lithium in the battery; instead, getting the lithium in contact with an electrode is what slows things down. The electrodes also become a problem because they need to occupy more of the volume of the battery in order to maintain this rate of charge, which lowers the charge density. That's a major contributor to the halving of the battery's capacity mentioned in the previous paragraph.

A more significant problem is that these batteries may wind up facing an electric grid that was never meant to deal with them. A 1Wh cell phone battery could charge in 10 seconds, but would pull a hefty 360W in the process. A battery that's sufficient to run an electric vehicle could be fully charged in five minutes—which would make electric vehicles incredibly practical—but doing so would pull 180kW, which is most certainly not practical.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 482505
Only if we can get cars to go over 300 miles per charge, we can wait half hour to charge it.
Anonymous Coward
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03/18/2009 03:26 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
mE AGAIN: THIS IS A MUST READ.
A new version of lithium battery technology can either provide a higher storage density than current batteries, or can charge and discharge as fast as a supercapacitor, emptying its entire charge in under 10 seconds.

It's getting difficult to overstate the importance of battery technology. Compact, high-capacity batteries are an essential part of portable electronics already, but improved batteries are likely to play a key role in the auto industry, and may eventually appear throughout the electric grid, smoothing over interruptions in renewable power sources. Unfortunately, battery technology often involves a series of tradeoffs among factors like capacity, charging time, and usable cycles. Today's issue of Nature reports on a new version of lithium battery technology that may just be a game-changer.

The new work involves well-understood technology, relying on lithium ions as charge carriers within the battery. But the lithium resides in a material that was designed specifically to allow it to move through the battery quickly, which means charges can be shifted in and out of storage much more rapidly than in traditional formulations of lithium batteries. The net result is a battery that, given the proper electrodes, can perform a complete discharge in under 10 seconds—the sort of performance previously confined to the realm of supercapacitors.

This appears to be one of those cases where applications badly lagged theory. Since lithium ions are the primary charge carriers in most batteries, the rates of charging and discharging the batteries wind up proportional to the speed at which lithium ions can move within the battery material. Real-world battery experience would suggest that lithium moves fairly slowly through most types of batteries, but theoretical calculations suggested that there was no real reason that should be the case—lithium should be able to move quite briskly.

A number of recent papers suggested that, in at least one lithium battery class (based on LiFePO4), the problem wasn't the speed at which lithium moved—instead, it could only enter and exit crystals of this salt at specific locations. This, in turn, indicated that figuring a way to speed up this process would increase the overall performance of the battery.

To accomplish this, the authors developed a process that created a disorganized lithium phosphate coating on the surfaces of LiFePO4 crystals. By tweaking the ratio of iron to phosphorous in the starting mix and heating the material to 600°C under argon for ten hours, the authors created a material that has a glass-like coating that's less than 5nm thick, which covers the surface of pellets that are approximately 50nm across. That outer coating has very high lithium mobility, which allows charge to rapidly move into and out of storage in the LiFePO4 of the core of these pellets. In short, because lithium can move quickly through this outer coating, it can rapidly locate and enter the appropriate space on the LiFePO4 crystals.

The results are pretty astonishing. At low discharge rates, a cell prepared from this material discharges completely to its theoretical limit (~166mAh/g). As the authors put it, "Capacity retention of the material is superior." Running it through 50 charge/discharge cycles revealed no significant change in the total capacity of the battery.

But the truly surprising features of the cell came when the authors tweaked the cathode to allow higher currents to be run into the cell. Going from a rate of 2 Coulombs to 200 dropped the total capacity down to about 110mAh/g, but increased the power rate by two orders of magnitude (that's a hundred-fold increase) compared to traditional lithium batteries. Amazingly, under these conditions, the charge capacity of the battery actually increased as it underwent more charge/discharge cycles. Doubling the charge transport to 400C cut the capacity in half, but again doubled the power rate. At the 400C rate, the entire battery would discharge in as little as nine seconds. That sort of performance had previously only been achieved using supercapacitors.

At this point, the authors calculate, the primary limiting factor is no longer storing lithium in the battery; instead, getting the lithium in contact with an electrode is what slows things down. The electrodes also become a problem because they need to occupy more of the volume of the battery in order to maintain this rate of charge, which lowers the charge density. That's a major contributor to the halving of the battery's capacity mentioned in the previous paragraph.

A more significant problem is that these batteries may wind up facing an electric grid that was never meant to deal with them. A 1Wh cell phone battery could charge in 10 seconds, but would pull a hefty 360W in the process. A battery that's sufficient to run an electric vehicle could be fully charged in five minutes—which would make electric vehicles incredibly practical—but doing so would pull 180kW, which is most certainly not practical.Only if we can get cars to go over 300 miles per charge, we can wait half hour to charge it.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 635745
We must get the cars first
Anonymous Coward
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03/18/2009 05:09 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
In time we will have our electrics cars
Anonymous Coward
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03/18/2009 05:42 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
In time we will have our electrics cars
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 637692
The time is now!
wtf is this IN TIME CRAP
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 513766
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03/19/2009 04:37 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Honda FCX
Honda already has two current-generation FCXs on lease to ordinary consumers. (Others are leased to government and corporate fleets.) Both are in California, one with a suburban family, the other with the 17-year-old actress Q'orianka Kilcher.
The current FCX, the lower one here, looks boxy and awkward, the automotive equivalent of therapeutic footwear. The new FCX looks like a top-of-the-line Nike, flashy, futuristic, and cool.

The new version is also lighter, roomier inside and more powerful.
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03/19/2009 07:05 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Honda FCX
Honda already has two current-generation FCXs on lease to ordinary consumers. (Others are leased to government and corporate fleets.) Both are in California, one with a suburban family, the other with the 17-year-old actress Q'orianka Kilcher.
The current FCX, the lower one here, looks boxy and awkward, the automotive equivalent of therapeutic footwear. The new FCX looks like a top-of-the-line Nike, flashy, futuristic, and cool.

The new version is also lighter, roomier inside and more powerful.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 513766

Would like to to see one.
Anonymous Coward
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United States
03/19/2009 07:05 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
Honda FCX
Honda already has two current-generation FCXs on lease to ordinary consumers. (Others are leased to government and corporate fleets.) Both are in California, one with a suburban family, the other with the 17-year-old actress Q'orianka Kilcher.
The current FCX, the lower one here, looks boxy and awkward, the automotive equivalent of therapeutic footwear. The new FCX looks like a top-of-the-line Nike, flashy, futuristic, and cool.

The new version is also lighter, roomier inside and more powerful.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 513766

Would like to to see one.
Anonymous Coward
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United States
03/22/2009 05:36 PM
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Re: Check out what the corn state has(Nebraska)Electric motorcycle
When are we getting any of this?

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