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Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away

 
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 04:24 PM
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Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Seriously do enlighten me.Earlier the Moon was a Yellow colour and was the biggest I have ever seen it whilst monitoring it.Other times it has looked smaller .How when it is moving away from the Earth weakening Gravitational pull .It should roughly always be the same size being 238,856 miles away,not shrink and expanding in view.Explain !
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 04:32 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Optical illusion.

[link to en.wikipedia.org]
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:10 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Optical illusion.

[link to en.wikipedia.org]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 607650

Well speechless but thanks for the link. Good read.
nomuse (NLI)
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02/10/2009 05:13 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
The angular diameter of the Moon is approximately 1/2 degree, or 1/3 to 1/4 the size of your thumb with your arm outstretched.

Cover the Moon with your thumb when it is close to the horizon. Repeat the exercise several hours later. Compare.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:17 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
You know what I think is strange?

How can the moon and sun both be out but the moon goes through it's stages still.

Is the moon a sphere or flat? Seriously, shouldn't a round object be fully illuminated when a direct light is on it?
nomuse (NLI)
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02/10/2009 05:24 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
It isn't direct light.

You have to envision the Earth/Moon system from above to get the geometry of it.

Imagine, here is the Earth in the middle of our diagram, the Sun is to the right of the diagram, the Western hemisphere is pointing to the right so that the Sun is directly over Texas.

Now draw the Moon on the same diagram, above the Earth, so that to the guys and gals in that great state the Moon is sitting on the horizon.

As you will see, both the Moon and the Earth are half in the light, half out of the light. You are in the half of the Earth that is lit (assuming you are from "Big D," I mean Dallas). However, you are looking at the SIDE of the Moon, and you see half of it lit, and half of it not.

It's clearer with a diagram, but I thought I'd try it in words first. Besides...there are a million of those diagrams out there. If you've already seen them, and didn't get it, then maybe words are best for you.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:25 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
You know what I think is strange?

How can the moon and sun both be out but the moon goes through it's stages still.

Is the moon a sphere or flat? Seriously, shouldn't a round object be fully illuminated when a direct light is on it?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 588041


the earth blocks the light..

the end.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:27 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
You know what I think is strange?

How can the moon and sun both be out but the moon goes through it's stages still.

Is the moon a sphere or flat? Seriously, shouldn't a round object be fully illuminated when a direct light is on it?


the earth blocks the light..

the end.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 612081


Nope.

How can the Earth block the light when BOTH bodies are overhead?
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:28 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
You know what I think is strange?

How can the moon and sun both be out but the moon goes through it's stages still.

Is the moon a sphere or flat? Seriously, shouldn't a round object be fully illuminated when a direct light is on it?


the earth blocks the light..

the end.


Nope.

How can the Earth block the light when BOTH bodies are overhead?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 588041


because from our perspective, that is what we see..if you we're looking at the moon 500.000 miles upwards from earth,you would see a near, full moon...(during our present time)
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:29 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
o my gaaawwwd! Really?
get a lamp with a bare light bulb, a tennis ball and a golf ball and figure it the fuck you you retard. alternatively go back to 4th or 5th grade science class.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:31 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
You know what I think is strange?

How can the moon and sun both be out but the moon goes through it's stages still.

Is the moon a sphere or flat? Seriously, shouldn't a round object be fully illuminated when a direct light is on it?


the earth blocks the light..

the end.


Nope.

How can the Earth block the light when BOTH bodies are overhead?


because from our perspective, that is what we see..if you we're looking at the moon 500.000 miles upwards from earth,you would see a near, full moon...(during our present time)
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 612081


Mmmm. I'm still not sure. I've seen each stage of the moon with BOTH bodies overhead.

I'm not saying you are wrong. I'm just saying that some science is off or I'm very clueless and should probably stop searching for truth like Salomon.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:31 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
The size of the moon/sun on the horizon -

open and close 1 eye

THE END
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:34 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
o my gaaawwwd! Really?
get a lamp with a bare light bulb, a tennis ball and a golf ball and figure it the fuck you you retard. alternatively go back to 4th or 5th grade science class.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 487397


I certainly hope you don't talk to your grandmother that way. In fact, you are an offensive individual. You own wisdom is for you alone, don't share your tripe with others.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:37 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
The angular diameter of the Moon is approximately 1/2 degree, or 1/3 to 1/4 the size of your thumb with your arm outstretched.

Cover the Moon with your thumb when it is close to the horizon. Repeat the exercise several hours later. Compare.
 Quoting: nomuse (NLI) 610185

The moon seen at the Horizon is furthest from the earth, as the earth slowly spins on its axis it turns towards the moon directly underneath it, the same could be said about the sun, so, "why is it that we don't see the moon/sun bigger?"

bump bump
nomuse (NLI)
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02/10/2009 05:41 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Mmmm. I'm still not sure. I've seen each stage of the moon with BOTH bodies overhead.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 588041


Sorta.

The phase of the Moon is DIRECTLY related to the visual distance between it and the Sun.

A crescent Moon MUST be near the Sun.

If the Sun is just setting, and the Moon is at the Zenith, even without looking up you know the Moon is in a quarter phase.

And a full Moon MUST be 180 degrees from the Sun. Which means it rises as the Sun sets, and sets as the Sun rises; you will never see them both in the sky at the same time.



I'm not saying you are wrong. I'm just saying that some science is off or I'm very clueless and should probably stop searching for truth like Salomon.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 588041


Never stop.

And by that I also mean; don't stop at the easy answers ("Aliens musta done it") or stop because it seems too hard to figure out ("I guess I'll never know -- and I'll bet no-one else knows either.")

Finding the truth is a lot of work. And it is an ongoing, lifetime endeavor.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:42 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
It's clearer with a diagram, but I thought I'd try it in words first. Besides...there are a million of those diagrams out there. If you've already seen them, and didn't get it, then maybe words are best for you.
 Quoting: nomuse (NLI) 610185

Do the OP a favor and get one of those diagrams!

bump bump
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:45 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Mmmm. I'm still not sure. I've seen each stage of the moon with BOTH bodies overhead.


Sorta.

The phase of the Moon is DIRECTLY related to the visual distance between it and the Sun.

A crescent Moon MUST be near the Sun.

If the Sun is just setting, and the Moon is at the Zenith, even without looking up you know the Moon is in a quarter phase.

And a full Moon MUST be 180 degrees from the Sun. Which means it rises as the Sun sets, and sets as the Sun rises; you will never see them both in the sky at the same time.




I'm not saying you are wrong. I'm just saying that some science is off or I'm very clueless and should probably stop searching for truth like Salomon.


Never stop.

And by that I also mean; don't stop at the easy answers ("Aliens musta done it") or stop because it seems too hard to figure out ("I guess I'll never know -- and I'll bet no-one else knows either.")

Finding the truth is a lot of work. And it is an ongoing, lifetime endeavor.
 Quoting: nomuse (NLI) 610185


Nomuse's alarm bells rang. A moon thread. His job is to quickly squash anything about moon fakery.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 435130
United Kingdom
02/10/2009 05:48 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
It's clearer with a diagram, but I thought I'd try it in words first. Besides...there are a million of those diagrams out there. If you've already seen them, and didn't get it, then maybe words are best for you.

Do the OP a favor and get one of those diagrams!

bump bump
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 611903

Wish I could eat your brain.Why do you know so much?
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:51 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
However, why is the illusion of Earth different with the Apollo Astronauts/pics from the Moon ?
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 05:55 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Mmmm. I'm still not sure. I've seen each stage of the moon with BOTH bodies overhead.


Sorta.

The phase of the Moon is DIRECTLY related to the visual distance between it and the Sun.

A crescent Moon MUST be near the Sun.

If the Sun is just setting, and the Moon is at the Zenith, even without looking up you know the Moon is in a quarter phase.

And a full Moon MUST be 180 degrees from the Sun. Which means it rises as the Sun sets, and sets as the Sun rises; you will never see them both in the sky at the same time.




I'm not saying you are wrong. I'm just saying that some science is off or I'm very clueless and should probably stop searching for truth like Salomon.


Never stop.

And by that I also mean; don't stop at the easy answers ("Aliens musta done it") or stop because it seems too hard to figure out ("I guess I'll never know -- and I'll bet no-one else knows either.")

Finding the truth is a lot of work. And it is an ongoing, lifetime endeavor.


Nomuse's alarm bells rang. A moon thread. His job is to quickly squash anything about moon fakery.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 612072

I was thinking the same thing lol. You can't take away the fact that we are getting free knowledge from him here.I have learnt much.
Czarlon

User ID: 612155
United States
02/10/2009 05:55 PM

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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
You know what I think is strange?

How can the moon and sun both be out but the moon goes through it's stages still.

Is the moon a sphere or flat? Seriously, shouldn't a round object be fully illuminated when a direct light is on it?


the earth blocks the light..

the end.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 612081



The Earth does not block the light to or from the Moon. If it did it would be an eclipse, there are as many degrees of eclipse as there are phases to the Moon. Now back to astronomy 101, The Moon orbits the Earth. That means it goes around the Earth. As the Moon is orbiting the Earth the Earth is orbiting the Sun. Different perspectives of the Moon from an Earth based viewer are possible. The Moon while part of it is always full from the Sun side only shows phases with respect to Earth. A person may see only a phase of the Moon (i.e. half) that does not mean the Earth is shadowing the other half. It does mean that from a vantage point on Earth we only see half of the Moon lit. From a vantage point outside of the Earth it is still a full Moon. The dark half that you see as an observer is from the shadow of the Moons own making..
nomuse (NLI)
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02/10/2009 05:58 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Here's one.

[link to www.curriki.org]
nomuse (NLI)
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02/10/2009 06:00 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Oh, and yes I do...


It's a high-tech procedure known as "I use the search function at the top of the page."

I LIKE Moon threads. If I'm bored, and I come here to be entertained, I enter "moon" into that cute little box, and I see what people are talking about that day.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 06:03 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Wish I could eat your brain.Why do you know so much?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 435130

BoE
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 06:08 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
 Quoting: nomuse (NLI) 610185

I'm sorry sir but you may be confused to what the OP desires to know. The link you posted doesn't refer to that acquisition, in fact that link doesn't even mention the Horizon.

Please try to keep up with the discussion at hand! hf
Czarlon

User ID: 612155
United States
02/10/2009 06:11 PM

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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
And a full Moon MUST be 180 degrees from the Sun. Which means it rises as the Sun sets, and sets as the Sun rises; you will never see them both in the sky at the same time.

That is partially true. The Sun and Moon always share the same side of Earth's sky except on the day of a full moon, when they are 180 degrees separated. The day after a full Moon, (actually it happens almost instantly) then the sun starts to light the other side of the Moon. That is why the crescent Moon faces one way and then the other.
Czarlon

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United States
02/10/2009 06:26 PM

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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Here's one.

[link to www.curriki.org]

I'm sorry sir but you may be confused to what the OP desires to know. The link you posted doesn't refer to that acquisition, in fact that link doesn't even mention the Horizon.

Please try to keep up with the discussion at hand! hf
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 611903



Ok I digress, you are right. Let me see if I can explain. When the Moon is near the horizon the light from the Sun reflecting onto the Moon is seen through more of the Earth's atmosphere. What happens is as you look through the atmosphere there is water vapor there. This water vapor acts as a refractive lens which in turn magnifies the apparent size of the Moon. It is just an optical illusion. The size of the Moon does not really change.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 06:52 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
I LIKE Moon threads. If I'm bored, and I come here to be entertained, I enter "moon" into that cute little box, and I see what people are talking about that day.
 Quoting: nomuse (NLI) 610185


Ummm, no. You are hired for all threads related to NASA nonsense.

You are desperate to keep the lid on everything. It's your job.
Anonymous Coward
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02/10/2009 06:55 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
Oh, and yes I do...


It's a high-tech procedure known as "I use the search function at the top of the page."

I LIKE Moon threads. If I'm bored, and I come here to be entertained, I enter "moon" into that cute little box, and I see what people are talking about that day.
 Quoting: nomuse (NLI) 610185

Some of us do appreciate your input.thanks.
czygyny

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02/10/2009 07:19 PM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
This website will give you a good visual explanation of the phases of the moon during it's orbit around the earth.

At the top you can put in, for instance, 'days' and it will move the earth and moon and show you the resultant moon phase:

[link to jove.geol.niu.edu]
Kletos, Eklektos & Pistos
nomuse (NLI)
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02/11/2009 03:25 AM
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Re: Tell me why the Moon is covering half the horizon when it is 238,855 miles away
And a full Moon MUST be 180 degrees from the Sun. Which means it rises as the Sun sets, and sets as the Sun rises; you will never see them both in the sky at the same time.

That is partially true. The Sun and Moon always share the same side of Earth's sky except on the day of a full moon, when they are 180 degrees separated. The day after a full Moon, (actually it happens almost instantly) then the sun starts to light the other side of the Moon. That is why the crescent Moon faces one way and then the other.
 Quoting: Czarlon



Yup. The Moon has to be EXACTLY full for the condition I described to apply. And it isn't EXACTLY full for even the length of an evening (moves, what, 1 1/2 times it's own diameter each night?)

However, since most location have some degree of obstruction on their horizons (around here, it's a set of hills to the East that cut off the first 15 degrees of sky), practically speaking, on the night of a full Moon you will not see the Sun in the same sky.

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